FIMM Dissertations
Here we list all the FIMM Doctoral Researchers who have already defended their thesis.
FIMM dissertations 2022

Histopathology-selective spatial oncogenic phenotypes in non-small cell lung cancer

February 7, 2022

Image-based tissue phenotyping has been commonly used for histological classification. It also allows the direct visualization of the distribution and expression of functional molecules. In this thesis, Jie Bao developed a spatial image analysis tool package (Spa-RQ) and applied these tools to discover spatial phenotypic features in non-small cell lung cancer histotypes, contributing to understanding the heterogeneous nature of tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug sensitivities.

The thesis was supervised by Dr. Emmy Verschuren and Dr. Peter Horvath.

FIMM dissertations 2021

Precision Medicine for Lung Cancer: Models, Functional Assays and Mechanisms

November 29, 2021

Functional profiling of tumor cells collected from cancer patients has the potential to tailor individualized cancer treatments. In this thesis, the translational potential of this strategy for non-small cell lung cancer was examined. Drug sensitivity and resistance testing were conducted using tumor-derived fresh uncultured or cultured cells from mouse models and clinical samples. The results demonstrate the clinical feasibility and utility of tumor-derived fresh uncultured or cultured cells for pharmacological research and for identifying individualized cancer treatments.

The thesis was supervised by Dr. Emmy Verschuren and Professor Krister Wennerberg.

FIMM dissertations 2020

Vishal Sinha: The DISC1 gene network in major mental illnesses in Finland

Date: 17 December, 2020

Supervisor: William Hennah

 

Liye He: Computational tools for high-throughput drug combination screening, synergy scoring and predictive modelling in cancer

Date: 22 October 2020 

Supervisors: Tero Aittokallio and Jing Tang

Elmo Saarentaus

Using large-scale cohorts to identify genetic backgrounds of complex traits

14 February 2022

LL Elmo Saarentaus's thesis focused on investigating and comparing the contribution of rare and common genetic variance to complex traits. The studies of this thesis highlight distinct features of both rare and common variation and challenge the single gene hypothesis for complex traits.

 

The thesis was supervised by Aarno Palotie, Olli Pietiläinen and Mitja Kurki.