SKY Courses are organized regularly in different fields of multidisciplinary gender studies. Courses are held mainly in English and are organized both as thematic courses centered on a specific issue or author and as workshop-like courses concentrating primarily on individual PhD projects. More information on  upcoming courses is updated here. NB. The upcoming course information is updated regularly, so we recommend to check it often.

Upcoming courses in 2018

 

Decolonising Knowledge Systems in the Social Sciences: The Power of Silences (5 ECTS) -SKY doctoral workshop, University of Helsinki, 5-6th. November

Course organizer:  Elina Penttinen University lecturer, Gender Studies, PI Incorporating Vulnerability: a non-fragmented approach to feminist research on violence, University of Helsinki

With guest lecturer: Associate Professor Swati Parashar School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg

Course description and goals:

There is a strong case for decolonisation of the Social Sciences and Gender studies, to break away from established thought processes, namely Eurocentric categories and concepts and open up to non-Western and non-linear forms of knowledges. For example, we need to think of societies in the global South as “knowing subjects” instead of “passive objects” available for Western research and scholarship. We need to ask how decolonization of knowledge systems challenges key themes in feminist methodology, such as self-reflectivity and sensitivity to power relations in the process of research and inquire whether feminist methodology is always already decolonized. One way to do this is to decolonise the methods we adopt in our research and the epistemological frameworks through which we participate in knowledge creation and ask what are the practical consequences in terms for our research practices.

In this workshop we explore ways in which we can decolonise knowledge systems and reflect on our own subjectivities and research projects in that process. We collectively rethink the methods we use in our research and the epistemologies that frame our research questions and discuss innovative solutions. As an innovative method, we pay attention to various kinds of silences as a site of power in contested terrains. We discuss the ways to study silences and what they might reveal about power relations and survival strategies in sights of conflict and other constricted conditions. 

This workshop is useful for PhD students at all stages of the research process, who wish to work on clarifying epistemological frameworks, methodology and methods and create new insight.

The course is open for all SKY students, other Helsinki University PhD students and for students of other Finnish universities and all universities abroad.

The course includes a public lecture by Prof. Swati Parashar: Postcolonial Anxiety and the Crisis of Masculinity: The Rise of Right Wing Hindutva Movement in India.

The course is organized by the University of Helsinki Doctoral Programme for Gender, Culture, and Society (SKY) together with Incorporating Vulnerability: a non-fragmented approach to feminist research on violence (Helsinki University Three year grants)

Maximum number of students accepted for the course is 10.

Sign up for the course by 15th of October 2018 at: https://elomake.helsinki.fi/lomakkeet/68302/lomake.html

You will be asked to provide contact information and a short description of your research project and to identify key issues which you wish to work in your research in relation to course outline.

Course structure and requirements:

Prior to course-start: Prepare a short paper (max 4000 words) on the epistemology and methodology of your dissertation. Submit the paper by Friday 26th of October. Read assigned readings for the course and papers of the participants.

During the course: Attendance involves the following activities: discussion on the readings, group exercises and commenting on the papers of other students with teachers. Workshop takes place on 5-6th of November between 10-15:30.

6th November, 4–6pm. Course students are expected to take actively part in the discussion in the Christina research seminar guest lecture. 


Bio

Swati Parashar is Associate Professor in Peace and Development at the School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Sweden and Visiting Faculty, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. In 2016, she was a Visiting Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies (CSDS), Delhi. Her research engages with the intersections between feminism and postcolonialism, focused on conflict and development issues in South Asia. She is the author of Women and Militant Wars: The Politics of Injury (Routledge: London, 2014) and co-editor (with Ann Tickner and Jacqui True) of Revisiting Gendered States: Feminist Imaginings of the State in International Relations (OUP: London, New York 2018)

Elina Penttinen is a University lecturer and Director of Master’s programme in Gender Studies, University of Helsinki. She is the PI of a multidisicpilinary research project Incorporating Vulnerability a non-fragmented approach to feminist research on violence, funded by University of Helsinki Three year grants. She is the author of of Gender and Mobility: a critical introduction (2017) Rowman & Littlefield; Joy and International Relations: a new methodology (2013) Routledge, Globalization, Prostitution and Sex-Trafficking: corporeal politics (2008) Routledge. She teaches courses on feminist methodology, scientific writing, gender and culture and supervises doctoral thesis projects in Gender, Culture and Society doctoral programme.

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Queer/ing Kinship (5 ECTs) SKY -doctoral course at University of Helsinki, 3-4 December 2018

Course organizer (PI): Dr. Antu Sorainen (University of Helsinki, Finland)

Visiting course lecturers:

Dr. Elisabeth Lund Engebretsen (University of Stavanger, Norway)

Dr. Thomas Strong (Maynooth University, Ireland)

Course introduction:

This PhD course concentrates on the ongoing work of the participating PhD students on kinship, care and support networks located at sexual and gendered margins. The experienced lecturers have the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with the highest international quality.

The course literature comprises scholarship ranging from feminist and anthropological theory to queer studies on kinship and relatedness to the politics and legal constellations of family, kinship and care relations.

The course focuses on developing PhD student projects, where all of the projects cluster around a set of themes related to contemporary discussion of kinship/relationality and various axes of inequality or marginalisation (in particular, sexuality and gender).

The expertise of the three lecturers is in a wide area of kinship, relatedness, gender studies, queer theory and ethnography. All three have conducted original empirical research on alternative kinship and care relations, published widely in this area, and contributed towards re-invigorating contemporary ethnographic and methodological approaches.

The lecturers are prepared to comment on empirical, methodological and/or theoretical aspects of PhD research papers and students’ original research or fieldwork. However, theoretical projects that comment on the existing work of various scholars that intersect with gender studies, queer theory and kinship politics are also very welcome.

The course includes the public lecture by Dr. Thomas Strong:  “Errors in Kinship: Witches, Queers”.

The course is organized by the University of Helsinki Doctoral Programme for Gender, Culture, and Society (SKY) together with the two Academy of Finland projects CoreKin – Contrasting and Re-Imagining the Margins of Kinship and Wills and Inheritance in Sexually Marginalised Groups.

The course is open for all SKY students, other Helsinki University PhD students and for students of other Finnish universities and all universities abroad.

Course Teachers:

Elisabeth Lund Engebretsen is an Associate Professor of Gender Studies, University of Stavanger, Norway. Engebretsen holds a PhD in Anthropology from the London School of Economics (2008). Among her publications are Queer Women in Urban China: An Ethnography (2014), and the co-edited special issue of Sexualities on “Anthropology’s queer sensibilities” (2017). She has conducted extensive ethnographic fieldwork in China on queer kinship, family strategies, identity and activism, and has current research interests in Norwegian queer history, transnational Pride activism, feminist ethnography and methodology, and radical solidarity work. Engebretsen heads the 2-year workshop project Transforming Identities: Exploring changes, tensions, and visions in the Nordic region through the prism of identity politics (2018-2020).

Thomas Strong teaches in the Department of Anthropology at Maynooth University (Ireland). He was educated at Reed College (BA) and Princeton University (PhD), and taught at the University of Helsinki in 2006-08. He has published essays on the symbolism and sociality of blood supplies, queer theory and the anthropology of kinship, and problematics of modernity in Papua New Guinea, among other topics. Currently, he is preparing a book manuscript provisionally entitled "Blood to Blood: Witchcraft and the Violence of Kinship in Papua New Guinea,” based on long-term fieldwork in the Asaro Valley that he began in 1998. He has been an AIDS activist since 1992.

Antu Sorainen is an Academy Fellow at the Academy of Finland and Docent in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. She has conducted empirical studies in the area of queer will-writing and relatedness, and published work on law and queer sexualities. She is the co-author of Siveellisyydest䠓eksuaalisuuteen with Tuija Pulkkinen and has published recently on inheritance arrangements in queer communities. She is Academy of Finland Research Fellow for a project entitled: “Wills and Inheritance in Sexually Marginalised Groups” (2014-2019), and the director of the research project “CoreKin – Contrasting and Re-Imagining the Margins of Kinship” (2016-2020).

Course structure and requirements:

1. Prior to course-start:

A) Submitting a 2-page description of the dissertation project (a project abstract of 300-400 words and the table of contents), and a research paper of 10–12 pages (part of the dissertation project).

B) Reading of pre-assigned literature and the other PhD students’ pre-delivered materials: course reading list and full student papers will be sent to the participants after 23th November, after the applications have been decided on.

2. During the course:

A) Attending the full 2-day workshop on 3-4 December 2018. Attendance involves the following activities: Commenting on the projects and papers of the other students, and discussing one’s own project with the teachers and co-students.

B) Attending Dr. Thomas Strong’s public lecture “Errors in Kinship: Witches, Queers” on Tuesday 4th December 2018, 4–6pm. Course students are expected to take actively part in the discussion after the lecture. 


Application procedure and deadlines (antu.sorainen@helsinki.fi):

Apply with a max 150-word abstract of the paper by

Friday 9th November 2018.

Applicants will be informed by the outcome by email no later than

Friday 16th November 2018.

Deadline for submitting papers is Friday 23th November 2018.

NB! A number of foreign students would be accepted on the roll basis if they need more time to arrange their travel/grant.

Maximum number of students accepted for the course is 10.

https://www.facebook.com/events/190163735155916/

http://corekin.fi/2018/06/20/apply-now-international-phd-course-queer-ing-kinship-helsinki-university-december-2018/

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SKY BEGIN pe/Friday 1.2. 2018 

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SKY – Prepare for postdoc 7.3. 2019

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“Making it like a man”: men, masculinities and the modern ’career’. -Symposium. 25-26 October. 

Organised by Josephine Hoegaerts, Kadri Aavik and Janne T. Salminen

University of Helsinki, Finland

Recent critical representations of the workplace seem to leave little doubt about its gendered norms and conventions. Glass ceilings, the gender pay gap, leaky pipelines, old boys’ networks, calls for women to lean in (not to mention recurring reports of gendered harassment) all point to an assumption of male homosociability as an enduring norm in 21st century ‘work’.

Based on an ‘industrial’ separation of spheres relegating women to the hearth while leaving men the freedom to move between the domestic and public (Tosh, 1999) and gendered narratives of entrepreneurship and social climbing mired in aggression (Kelly, 2003; Tjeder, 2002), understandings of the workplace as culturally, discursively and indeed legally coded masculine as well as an implicit masculine embodiment of ‘work’ (McGinley, 2016; Acker 1990) are now questioned and criticized by media-discourse, critical research, and by daily practice.

Noting that the workplace remains largely implicitly masculine, though politically pertinent, does little to elucidate how masculinity and careers are connected, how workers do masculinity and how masculinity does cultural work for the reproduction and/or contestation of (post)industrialism, capitalism and neo-liberalism. It also fails to take into account the range of masculinities ‘at work’ and the diversity of social, cultural and professional contexts in which they take shape.

In this conference, we aim to focus on the multiple and diverse masculinities ‘at work’ in the processes of professionalization and career management that typify modern working life. Spanning both historical approaches to the rise of ‘profession’ as a marker of masculinity, and critical approaches to the current structures of management, employment and workplace hierarchy, we set out to question what role masculinity plays in cultural understandings, affective experiences and mediatized representations of a professional ‘career’.

We welcome contributions from all disciplines in the social sciences and humanities on subjects such as:

  • Men and masculinities as markers of a career in specific professional fields (e.g. political, artistic, academic, legal, etc. careers)
  • Men and masculinities in the historical development of the notion of ‘career’
  • The hierarchical nature of careers and career management and its links/tensions with modern masculinities
  • Men and masculinities and the gendered nature of careers in the capitalist or neo-liberal workplace
  • Daily practices of career-management and its intersection with practices of gender, particularly with doing masculinity
  • Men, masculinities and intersectionality in relation to careers in a global context and globalized world: international mobilities and intercultural exchange
  • Men, masculinities and precarity in relation to professional careers
  • Intersectional approaches to men and masculinities, taking stock of geographical and cultural understandings of careers and their gendered effects
  • The changing notion of ‘career’ in modern times and ways in which new conceptualizations of ‘career’ are shaping masculinities and are in turn shaped by changing masculinities (for example, online careers divorced from workplaces as physical sites etc.)
  • Rethinking and/or mobilizing men and masculinities in critical approaches to move towards gender equality in career building and management
  • New approaches to work and careers which have the potential to challenge traditional ways of doing masculinity and/or rethink careers in terms of masculinities.

There is no participation fee

For more information, please contact: Josephine.hoegaerts@helsinki.fi , kadri.aavik@helsinki.fi, or janne.t.salminen@helsinki.fi

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Sukupuolentutkimuksen päivät 22-24.11. 2018 Turku 

https://blogit.utu.fi/supupaivat2018/en/

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SKY BEGIN pe/Friday 1.2. 2018 

 

SKY MEETs are workshop meetings organized three times a year (in January, May, and October), two of which we would like each PhD student to take part. The participants are asked to prepare a paper that is a contribution to their dissertation; the papers and the whole projects are discussed in detail small scale workshops. SKY MEETs provide an opportunity for interdisciplinary discussion and networking for both supervisors and PhD students.

SKY MEETs in 2018-2019:

  • SKY MEET 1/2018 Thursday, January 11th
  • SKY MEET 2/2018 Thursday, May 17th
  • SKY MEET 3/2018 Thursday, October 25th
  • SKY MEET 1/2019 Thursday, January 17th
  • SKY MEET 2/2019 Thursday, May 16th.

For the SKY MEET, you need to send a 1-2 page table of contents paper of your overall project, and a 10-12 page paper which contributes to your dissertation project. If you are in the very beginning of your dissertation, you can replace the 10-12 page paper with a research plan and disposition. You can also bring a paper that you have already presented in another seminar, if you cannot produce a new paper now.

In the workshop you will get in-depth comments on your project and the paper from the members of you workshop team, which includes supervisors and PhD students. This will be a new group to comment on your work, and the same people will go on following your project later. You are also expected to read carefully the papers of the other PhD students of your workshop group, and to give comments on them with a positive attitude of advice as how to advance their completion as high quality dissertations in their own time frame.

SKY Advanced Research Seminar (also known as Christina Research Seminar) is held every two weeks during the Autumn and Spring semesters to bring together researchers from different fields of gender related research. The seminar is open for everyone and it consist of a public talk given by a national or international guest researcher followed by a discussion.

Led by the professor of Gender studies, Christina research seminar provides a forum of discussion on resent research for both national and international visiting scholars, as well as scholars with an interest in this field of research, working in the different departments and units at the University of Helsinki. With high quality public presentations and discussions Christina research seminar contributes to academic discussion, an essential element of any international research university. The seminar is open to everybody with an interest in research questions related to gender studies. You can participate in selected lectures or join the whole seminar.

Since 2014 the seminar has become an integral part of the SKY doctoral programme. Invited scholars give a public talk in the seminar as a part of their SKY course, which gives both SKY doctoral students and others a chance to partake the lecture.

The invited speakers include scholars working on the most interesting, recent research in the field, and every presentation is followed by an intensive and critical discussion, which provides a view to the diversity of and the multiple voices in the field. The seminar provides an opportunity to enjoy intellectual debate and moments of inspiration in the midst of academic everyday work – be sure to mark the dates in your calendars.

Fall term 2018

Venue: Lecture hall C120, Unioninkatu 38 (Topelia)
Time: Tuesday, 16­-18.   
Responsible professor: Tuija Pulkkinen

9.10. Prof. Suvi Keskinen (University of Helsinki, Swedish School of Social Sciences, The Center for Research on Ethnic Relations and Nationalism (CEREN)
”'Crisis' of White hegemony, Neonationalist Femininities and Antiracist Feminism”

23.10 Dr. Marietta Radomska  (University of  Linköping and visiting researcher in Art History at University of Helsinki )
“On Bioart, the Non/Living and Promises of Monstrous Futures”

6.11. Prof.  Swati Parashar (Senior lecturer, Institute of Global studies, University of Gothenburg Sweden) 
“Postcolonial Anxiety and the Crisis of Masculinity: The Rise of Right Wing Hindutva Movement in India”

4.12. Dr. Thomas Strong (Maynooth University, Ireland)
“Errors in Kinship: Witches, Queers”

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Abstracts:

9.10. Prof. Suvi Keskinen: ”'Crisis' of White hegemony, Neonationalist Femininities and Antiracist Feminism”

The rise of neonationalist politics and racist activism has characterised many European countries in recent years. Moreover, there is a growing public focus on gendered and sexualised intimacies. These two tendencies have increasingly intertwined and sexual violence has become a site for struggles over feminist and (anti)racist politics. The article examines what I call the ‘crisis’ of white hegemony arising in the aftermath of the arrival of a large number of refugees in 2015-2016 and the different strategies that women’s and feminist activism has developed. Within white nationalism, there is an upsurge of ‘white border guard femininities’: white women who mobilise on social media and in far-right groups. Simultaneously, antiracist feminist activism has strengthened. It seeks to confront racist discourses of foreign perpetrators and to redirect the discussion by addressing structural aspects of racial and gendered hierarchies and voicing experiences of harassment that are bypassed in the public discussions. 

Bio:
Suvi Keskinen is Academy Research Fellow and Professor in Ethnic Relations and Nationalism (on research leave until 31.8.2019) at the Swedish School of Social Science, University of Helsinki. Her research interests include postcolonial feminism, critical race and whiteness studies, politics of belonging, nationalism, political activism and gendered violence. She is currently leading research projects on postethnic minority activism, intersectional border struggles and disobedient knowledge in activism, and ethnic/racial profiling by the police. Keskinen has studied right-wing populism and anti-immigration activism, media and political debates on migration and racism, gendered violence and youth in racialised residence areas. She has published several books and edited Special Issues, as well as journal articles in for example Social Politics, Women’s Studies International Forum, Ethnicities, Journal of Youth Studies, Nordic Journal of Migration Research, Critical Social Policy, Social Identities and Journal of Intercultural Studies.

 

Dr. Marietta Radomska: “On Bioart, the Non/Living and Promises of Monstrous Futures”

In the Western cultural imaginaries the monstrous is defined – following Aristotelian categorisations – by its excess, deficiency or displacement of organic matter.

These characteristics come to the fore in the field of bioart: a current in contemporary art that involves the use of biological materials (various kinds of soma: cells, tissues, organisms), and scientific procedures, technologies, protocols, and tools. Bioartistic projects and objects not only challenge the conventional ideas of embodiment and bodily boundaries, but also explore the relation between the living and non-living, organic and inorganic, human and nonhuman, as well as various thresholds of the living.

By looking at select bioartworks, this paper argues that the analysed projects offer a different ontology of life. More specifically, they expose life as uncontainable, that is, as a power of differentiation that traverses the divide between the living and non-living, organic and inorganic, human and nonhuman, and, ultimately, life and death. In this way, they draw attention to excess, processuality and multiplicity at the very core of life itself. Thus understood, life always already surpasses preconceived material and conceptual limits.

Finally, while taking Deleuzian feminisms and new materialism as its theoretical ground, the paper suggests that such a revision of the ontology of life may mobilise future conceptualisations of ethics that evade the anthropocentric logic dominant in the humanities and social sciences.

Bio:
Marietta Radomska, PhD, is a Postdoc at the Department of Thematic Studies – unit: Gender Studies, Linköping University, SE, and a Visiting Postdoctoral Researcher at the Department of Cultures – unit: Art History, University of Helsinki, FI (2018-2020). She is the co-director of The Posthumanities Hub; founder of The Eco- and Bioart Research Network, co-founder ofInternational Network for ECOcritical and DECOlonial Studies and a founding member of Queer Death Studies Network. Her current research project focuses on ecologies of death in the context of contemporary art. She is the author of the monograph Uncontainable Life: A Biophilosophy of Bioart (2016), and has published in Australian Feminist Studies, Somatechnics, and Angelaki, among others. For more info see: https://mariettaradomska.com/

E-mail: marietta.radomska@liu.se | marietta.radomska@helsinki.fi
 

Prof.  Swati Parashar: “Postcolonial Anxiety and the Crisis of Masculinity: The Rise of Right Wing Hindutva Movement in India”

The 2014 electoral mandate that brought the BJP (Bharatiya Janta Party) to power in India has been analyzed as part of the global transition towards the Right. It has been argued by India watchers and scholars, in public debates, that it was not only the most opportune time for the BJP to come back to power, given the inept Congress led UPA (United Progressive Alliance) rule for a decade but that the Right also had to reinvent itself to promise economic reforms and sabka saath, sabka vikas or inclusive development for all.  In this presentation, I argue that the BJP's victory in the 2014 federal elections and their subsequent take over of many state legislatures must be seen in continuity with the rise of the Hindutva Movement in India since the 1990s. The electoral victories of the BJP are only a small part of the story of the Hindutva shift which has engendered a much larger transformation at the social and cultural levels.These socio-cultural transformations in India coincide with shifts in global politics (end of the Cold War, rise of globalization and economic liberalization in the 90s) and much has been written about this. However, I am interested in the Hindutva Movement's links to postcolonial anxiety and the crisis of masculinity that India has witnessed since 1947. India's postcolonial anxiety is (re)produced by  popular history of colonialism and its legacy as discussed in public discourses and relived through everyday collective memories. The crisis of masculinity, on the other hand, is manifested in the rejection of the idea of the feminized/androgynous Indian state and polity of the Gandhi-Nehru era and the invocation of the great ancient Indian past (free of Islamic influence) where Hindu men were in control of their culture and destiny along with the patriarchal control over their women. I argue that Hindutva is both a product and response to the postcolonial anxiety, and its emphasis on 'making India great again' is a highly gendered political and socio-cultural project to reclaim masculinity in a wider historical context.

Bio:
Swati Parashar is Associate Professor in Peace and Development at the School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Sweden and Visiting Faculty, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. In 2016, she was a Visiting Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies (CSDS), Delhi. Her research engages with the intersections between feminism and postcolonialism, focused on conflict and development issues in South Asia. She is the author of Women and Militant Wars: The Politics of Injury (Routledge: London, 2014) and co-editor (with Ann Tickner and Jacqui True) of Revisiting Gendered States: Feminist Imaginings of the State in International Relations (OUP: London, New York 2018)

Past events in the Advanced Research Seminar

SPRING TERM 2018
30.1. at 16-18 Prof. Ann Phoenix
(University College London and Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies) and Marja Peltola (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies)
“Masculinities in New Times: 11-14 year old in Helsinki schools
Venue: Topelia, Unioninkatu 38D, Lecture hall C 120

13.2. at 16-18 Prof Tuija Pulkkinen (University of Helsinki)
”Judith Butler on Hannah Arendt - Appearing, Speaking, and the Bodily Aspects of Public Space” 
Venue: Topelia, Unioninkatu 38D, Lecture hall C 120

27.2. at 16-18 Dr Katja Kahlina (Marie Curie Fellow, University of Helsinki)
“Turning the tables? Shifting geopolitics of sexuality in the context of global anti-LGBTQ mobilisation” 
Venue: Topelia, Unioninkatu 38D, Lecture hall C 120

13.3. at 16-18 Prof. Jami Weinstein (Associate Professor, Linköping University)
"The Viral Politics and the Epigenetic Warfare of The New Wild West”
Venue: Topelia, Unioninkatu 38D, Lecture hall C 120

27.3. at 16-18 Dr Julian Honkasalo (Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Helsinki)
“Transgender agency and polyphonic voices in Swedish psychiatric research from the 1950s-1960s”
Venue: Topelia, Unioninkatu 38D, Lecture hall C 120

10.4. at 16-18 Dr. Hanna Ylöstalo (Helsinki Collegium of Advanced Studies)
“U-turn of gender equality policy? Government gender equality action plans as a technique of governance”
Venue: Topelia, Unioninkatu 38D, Lecture hall C 120

24.4. at 16-18 Prof. Vania Smith-Oka (Ass. Prof., Notre Dame University)
“Women Can’t Be Trauma Doctors, and Other Gendered Stories of Medicine”
Venue: Topelia, Unioninkatu 38D, Lecture hall C 120

15.5. at 16-18 Dennis Francis (Stellenbosch University, South Africa).
“Troubling the Gender and Sexuality Diversity in South African Schools.”
Venue: Topelia, Unioninkatu 38D, Lecture hall C 120

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FALL TERM 2017

12.9. Prof. Erzsebet Strausz (University of Warwick, UK)
Creativity as strategy and subversion in the neoliberal university: experiments in critical pedagogy, narrative research, and public engagement
19.9. Prof. Catherine Mills (University of Melbourne, Australia)
Biopolitics and sexual difference
26.9. Prof. Henriette Gunkel (Goldsmiths, University of London, UK)
Thinking Queer Temporality
24.10. Prof. María José Guerra-Palmero (University of La Laguna, Spain)
Human Insecurity, Migration and Survival. Gender and Human Rights
21.11.  Prof. Susanne Cusick (New York University)
On Feminist Historiographies of Music
28.11. Prof. Marta Segarra (University of Paris 8)
‘Show Me the Place’: New Forms of Kinship in a Posthuman World 
5.12. Prof. emer. Christine Battersby (University of Warwick)
Beauvoir’s Early Passion for Schopenhauer: Of Soap-Bubbles, Disappearance and After-Effects.

PLEASE SEE BELOW FOR ABSTRACTS AND MORE INFORMATION

12.9. Prof. Erzsebet Strausz (University of Warwick, UK): Creativity as strategy and subversion in the neoliberal university: experiments in critical pedagogy, narrative research, and public engagement

What would ‘radical’ pedagogy look like, feel like within the increasingly marketized structures of higher education, and what would it entail specifically for the teaching of International Relations? Drawing on critical pedagogy and critical theory, in my teaching and research I pursue experimental projects that explicitly engage with the processes of subject formation and their political implications in and beyond the classroom. ‘Teaching’ is often thought about as craft or technique within a neutral and apolitical structure of knowledge production and transfer, yet pedagogical practice is intimately linked with political subjecthood and subjectivity since ‘it provides the capacities, knowledge, skills and social relations through which individuals recognise themselves as social and political agents’ (Giroux, 2011: 124). Departing from some of the ways in which becoming a ‘knowing subject’ is encouraged, incentivized and enforced within both the discipline of IR and the neoliberal university I map out and discuss various vistas and practices in teaching and research that creatively challenge and subvert the political imagination of the market and promise more democratic, more accommodating modes of engagement with self, other, and the world studied. The paper offers a journey into experimental scholarship that explicitly engages with the political stakes of knowledge practices in our times and seeks out alternatives for inhabiting the modern university, the discipline of IR and contemporary structures of government otherwise. As a possible tool of transformation, it introduces the notion of ‘mindful pedagogy’ that cultivates a sense of personal and political awareness that is hopeful, resourceful, and forward-looking, restoring and affirming the potential of the modern university to serve as a space of critical reflection, democratic education and self-exploration (Williams, 2006).

Erzsebet Strausz is Assistant Professor in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Warwick. Her research focuses on post-structuralist theory, Critical Security Studies, critical pedagogy, as well as creative, experimental and narrative methods. She was awarded the British International Studies Association’s Excellence in Teaching International Studies Prize in 2017 and her research monograph, Writing the Self and Transforming International Relations: Towards a Politics of Liminality, is forthcoming with Routledge in 2018.

19.9. Prof. Catherine Mills (University of Melbourne, Australia): "Biopolitics and sexual difference"

There has been surprisingly little discussion in contemporary biopolitics literature of the role that reproduction plays in the extension and maintenance of the biopolitical management of life. This lack of discussion is surprising since, as I will argue, reproduction is central to the operation of biopolitics. Fortunately, the obfuscation of the relations between reproduction and biopolitics appears to be changing, with feminist scholars increasingly engaging with questions of reproduction as they pertain to theories of biopolitics, and vice versa. This is at least partly due to the fact that the contemporary politics and practices of reproduction are increasingly subject to risk, uncertainty and the neoliberal commodification of life processes. In this paper, I aim to extend this recent critical engagement between biopolitics and feminism in a theoretical direction. I will briefly examine the way that reproduction has been discussed (or not) in biopolitical theory to date, and, more importantly, begin to address the question of what an account of biopolitics that takes reproduction – and hence sexual difference – seriously would look like. I suggest that such an account would need to do (at least) two things: first, reconsider the emergence of the biopolitical state in light of feminist critiques of the patriarchal foundations of Western politics; and second, approach the reconceptualization of life through the matrix of sexual difference, which itself must be understood as a central aspect of modern biopolitics.

Catherine Mills is Associate Professor of Bioethics and the recipient of an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship in the Monash Bioethics Centre, Monash University. Her current research explores issues at the intersection of reproductive ethics, feminist philosophy and Continental philosophy, especially debates on biopolitics. She is the author of 3 books, Biopolitics (in press), Futures of Reproduction: Bioethics and Biopolitics, and The Philosophy of Agamben. She is currently undertaking projects on prenatal testing and disability, concepts of responsibility in reproductive ethics, and the inheritable genetic modification of human embryos. 

26.9. Prof. Henriette Gunkel (Goldsmiths, University of London, UK): Thinking Queer Temporality

The lecture will address time and how it manifests itself in the arts by focusing on the ways in which contemporary African film makers deploy temporal strategies in order to question and produce a political imaginary in the context of desire. I am particularly interested in the aesthetic and narrative strategies that the film Stories of Our Lives (Kenya, 2014) by Jim Chuchu/The Nest Collective employs – in the production of different future-orientated narratives, sound and image worlds that are understood as alternatives to our neoliberal and violent present. Through a number of different strategies of time manipulation, combined with queer-feminist strategies of fictioning and the empowering politics of alienation, the film Stories of Our Lives allows different temporalities to fold into and collide with each other and, by doing so, produces a decolonizing form of time travel. It unfolds, as I will argue, the multiple ways “of being with, in, and out of time, with others and without them”, as Elizabeth Grosz puts it, and produce powerful forms of sexual disorientation and becoming that bring us closer to an understanding of the potentiality of queerness and Afrofuturism as forces to think about freedom.

Henriette Gunkel  is lecturer in the Department of Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London. She is the author of The Cultural Politics of Female Sexuality in South Africa (Routledge, 2010) and co-editor of Undutiful Daughters: New Directions in Feminist Thought and Practice (Palgrave, 2012), What Can a Body Do? (Campus, 2010) and Frieda Grafe: 30 Filme (Brinkman & Bose, 2013). She is currently working on a monograph on Africanist science-fictional interventions, and on two further volumes: Visual Cultures as Time Travel, co-authored with Ayesha Hameed (Sternberg, forthcoming) and We Travel the Space Ways: Black Imagination, Fragments and Diffractions (Duke University Press, forthcoming).

24.10. at 16-18 Prof. María José Guerra-Palmero (University of La Laguna, Spain): Human Insecurity, Migration and Survival. Gender and Human Rights

The aim of this presentation is to show a different approach of forced migration driven by survival in the frame of human security´s discourse. The so-called crisis of refugees and the destabilization of the Middle East and many countries in Africa, as well as the situation of violence in Central America and Mexico, demand to re-contextualize the migratory question in new terms. Finally, we analyze the consequences of this disturbing increasing of the human insecurity from a gender perspective. The restrictive character of migratory policies is a key factor of the massive and active production of human vulnerability.

María José Guerra Palmero, Ph. D., is Professor of Philosophy and Gender Studies in the University of La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain. President of the Spanish Network of  Philosophy. She has published several books and papers in different philosophical journals as well as many chapters in collective works. Her research has been involved with contemporary political philosophy, feminist theory and applied ethics. Currently, she is the main researcher  with Eva Darias of the research project “Justice, citizenship and vulnerability. Narratives of precarity and intersectional approaches" (FI2015-63895-C2-1-R) supported by the Spanish Government.

21.11. Suzanne G. Cusick (Professor of Music on the Faculty of Arts and Science at New York University): "On Feminist Historiographies of Music"

Suzanne G. Cusick has published extensively on gender and sexuality in relation to the musical cultures of early modern Italy and of contemporary North America, including in the collections Musicology and Difference, Queering the Pitch, and Audible Traces. Her feminist readings of early modern music and musical culture have appeared in JAMS, Early Music, The Cambridge Companion to Monteverdi, and the Brazilian journal Per Musi. Revista Academica de Musica. Cusick's book, Francesca Caccini at the Medici Court: Music and the Circulation of Power (Chicago, 2009), received the 2010 book prize of the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women. In 2003-2012  she was the main editor of Women and Music. A Journal of Gender of Culture, the first journal  focused on the relationship of gender and sexuality to musical culture. She currently studies the use of noise, music and "gender coercion" in the detention and interrogation of prisoners held during the 21st-century's "war on terror," work for which she received the Philip Brett Award given by the LGBTQ Study Group of the American Musicological Society in 2007.

28.11. Prof. Marta Segarra (University of Paris 8): ‘Show Me the Place’: New Forms of Kinship in a Posthuman World 

This talk will consider how animalization of humans and humanization of nonhuman animals may lead to new forms of kinship. While some beings are relegated to the external margins of the human community and reduced to an anonymous mass, which is often more related to animality than to humanity, the association of humans and animals may also provide the possibility of a reformulation of the human community beyond the “family”. The talk will focus on how new “modes of intimate alliance” (Judith Butler’s definition of kinship) are established between nonhuman and human actors/characters in two performances: Bartabas’ and Murobushi’s choreography, The Centaur and the Animal (2010), and Maud Alpi’s film, Gorge Cœur Ventre (Still Life, 2016).

Marta Segarra is a Research Professor at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), and a member of the Laboratoire d’études de genre et de sexualité‒Research Center on Gender and Sexuality Studies (LEGS). She is also a Professor of Gender Studies and French Studies at the University of Barcelona (Spain), where she co-founded and directed (1994-2013) the Center for Women and Literature (now Theory, Gender, Sexuality). She also directed the Unesco Chair on Women, Development and Cultures (2004-2015). She has published in the fields of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Francophone Maghrebi Studies, contemporary French literature and cinema, biopolitics and posthumanism, for journals such as New Literary History, Mosaic, Contemporary French and Francophone Studies/Sites, or Paragraph. Her books include: Teoría de los cuerpos agujereados (Porous Bodies: A Theory, 2014), Differences in Common: Gender, Vulnerabilty and Community (co-ed. with J. Sabadell-Nieto, 2014), Demenageries. Thinking (of) Animals after Derrida (co-ed. with A. E. Berger, 2011), The Portable Cixous (ed., 2010), and Traces du désir (Traces of Desire, 2008).

5.12. Prof. emer. Christine Battersby (University of Warwick): Beauvoir’s Early Passion for Schopenhauer: Of Soap-Bubbles, Disappearance and After-Effects

One of the surprises in looking at Simone de Beauvoir’s Diary of a Philosophy Student Volume 1, 1926–1927 (first published in English in 2006) is the discovery that one of the first philosophical passions of Simone de Beauvoir was Arthur Schopenhauer. This finding is interesting in a number of rather different ways. First of all, it gives us insight into Beauvoir’s own philosophical grounding prior to her alliance with Sartre, especially in relation to the metaphysics of sexual love, freedom and also ethics.  In later life, Beauvoir often presented herself as simply applying a Sartrean framework in developing her own philosophical position; others have emphasised the influence of Bergson in her early works. It is also sometimes said that Beauvoir is closer to Hegel in her philosophical position than she is to Sartre. In this paper I look at her teenage Diary, along with other early essays and drafts published in the 2004 edition of Philosophical Writings, and argue that Schopenhauer -- whose own philosophy is extraordinarily misogynistic -- remains as a lingering presence in Beauvoir's writings, even when his name is absent from so many of the texts written after her alliance with Sartre.>>

Christine Battersby is Reader Emerita in the Department of Philosophy and an Associate Fellow of the Centre for Research in Philosophy, Literature and the Arts at the University of Warwick, UK. She is the author of Gender and Genius: Towards a Feminist Aesthetics (The Women’s Press and Indiana University Press, 1989, 1994); The Phenomenal Woman: Feminist Metaphysics and the Patterns of Identity (Polity and Routledge, 1998) and The Sublime, Terror and Human Difference (Routledge, 2007), as well as numerous articles on feminist aesthetics, feminist metaphysics and the history of philosophy and culture. Recent publications include a chapter entitled “Feminist Aesthetics and the Categories of the Beautiful and the Sublime” in the Routledge Companion to Feminist Philosophy, eds Ann Garry et al. (2017); one called “Natality, Materiality, Maternity: The Sublime and the Grotesque in Contemporary Sculpture”, in Motherhood in Literature and Culture, eds Gill Rye et al. (Routledge 2017); plus “Gillian Howie's Situated Philosophy: Theorizing Living and Dying ‘In Situation’” in On the Feminist Philosophy of Gillian Howie, eds D. Whistler and V. Browne (Bloomsbury Publishing 2016). See also: www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/philosophy/people/battersby

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SPRING TERM 2017
 
17.1. Heisook Kim (Professor, Ewha Womans University, South Korea)
 “Confucianism and Feminism in Korean Context: Confucian Care vs. Feminist Care”

28.2.  Kadri Aavik (Helsinki Collegium of Advanced Studies Fellow / Tallinn University )
“The Vulnerability of Gender Equality Mechanisms in the Post-Socialist Academia: "Doing Neoliberalism" in Estonian Universities”

14.3.  Dusica Ristivojevic  (Visiting Researcher, University of Helsinki, Gender Studies)
Feminism co-opted: Chinese “Feminist Five” and their global representations

28.3. Pawel Leszkowicz (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies Fellow)
“New Media and Intimate Democracy in Eastern Europe: The Video Art of Female Homoeroticism”

25.4. Marjut Jyrkinen (Associate Professor in Work-life Equality and Gender Studies, University of Helsinki)
"Women Managers in Gendered and Sexualised Workplaces: “MyManagement” coping strategies and reconstructuring of gender"

30.5.  Jack Halberstam (Professor, University of Southern California)
“TRANS*: A Quick and Quirky Account of Gender Variance”

PLEASE SEE BELOW FOR ABSTRACTS AND MORE INFORMATION

17.1. Heisook Kim (Professor, Ewha Womans University, South Korea)
“Confucianism and Feminism in Korean Context: Confucian Care vs. Feminist Care” 

This paper considers a recent claim that Confucianism and feminism are compatible both being care ethics. I examine some aspects of contemporary care ethics and compare them with Confucian ethics from a feminist viewpoint. I argue that for Confucianism to be made compatible with feminism, the former must be transformed to the extent that it loses its main features.
Care ethics can be feminist ethics only when women have been made moral subjects because of their perceived ability to care for others. Caring in a Confucian culture is not as much a feminine value than a male value. I do not find Confucian ethics as care ethics to be particularly liberating for women. For Confucianism to be viable in a contemporary democratic world, it must be supplemented by feminist ethics that take justice and equality as the primary values.
 
Heisook Kim received her B.A. in English Language and Literature and M.A. in Christian Studies from Ewha Womans University. She finished her Ph.D. in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Chicago. She has taught in the Department of Philosophy at Ewha Womans University since 1987. Her areas of interest range from epistemology/philosophical methodology to feminist philosophy within the cultural contexts of the East and the West. She served as President of the Korean Philosophical Association and also President of Korean Association of Women Philosophers. Since 2014, she is acting in the board of IAPh.

28.2.  Kadri Aavik (Helsinki Collegium of Advanced Studies Fellow / Tallinn University )
“The Vulnerability of Gender Equality Mechanisms in the Post-Socialist Academia: "Doing Neoliberalism" in Estonian Universities”

This paper explores the production of a gendered neoliberal rationality in post-socialist academic settings. Drawing on interviews conducted with key stakeholders in four major Estonian universities, I trace how three key gender equality policy measures are understood – quotas, workplace flexibility, and the involvement of men in efforts towards gender equality.

The findings suggest that these key ideas that form the basis of gender equality policy in Western, Nordic and EU contexts are filled with alternative meanings by Estonian academic stakeholders, in ways that distort their original purpose. These meanings primarily serve the interests of the corporate university, enabling and reinforcing the atomisation and exploitation of academic labourers, particularly women.

Collectively, these articulations constitute, along with other practices, the “doing of neoliberalism” in post-socialist university settings. Academic stakeholders do not (just) reflect an already established totalising neoliberal framework, but in fact, discursively create and reproduce what we have come to understand and refer to as “neoliberalism” in the academia.

This has implications for devising and implementing gender equality policies in higher education in the post-socialist region, as the solutions applied elsewhere in Europe might not work in the same way in Central-Eastern Europe

Kadri Aavik is a Lecturer in Sociology at Tallinn University and a Kone Fellow at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies. She is interested in understanding privilege and disadvantage from an intersectional perspective, and has studied this mainly in the context of the labour market. She is using and and developing intersectionality as a research method. Her latest research focuses on men and masculinities, gender and the neoliberalisation of universities, and critical animal studies. Her recent publications in English are:

Aavik, K. (2015). “The most important decisions are made in the sauna”: The Role of Social Capital in Creating Intersectional Privilege in the Career Narratives of Estonian Male Managers. NORMA: International Journal for Masculinity Studies 10(1), 39-54

Aavik, K. (2015). “Resistance to gender equality at work: Discursive practices of Estonian male managers”. In: M. Flood, with R. Howson (Eds.), Engaging Men in Building Gender Equality. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Press, 182-192 

Aavik, K., Kase, D. (2015). Challenging Sexism While Supporting Speciesism: The Views of Estonian Feminists on Animal Liberation and its Links to Feminism. Journal for Critical Animal  
Studies, 13(1), 92-127

14.3.  Dusica Ristivojevic  (Visiting Researcher, University of Helsinki, Gender Studies)
“Feminism co-opted: Chinese “Feminist Five” and their global representations”

In March 2015 five Chinese feminists were detained because of their planned activities against sexual harassment on public transportation. The “Feminist Five”, as the young women came to be known, received a truly remarkable attention of a number of influential social actors whose support got amplified by the digital outlets of English language media. This talk will situate the Feminist Five case within a context of ongoing reconfigurations of global geopolitical and symbolic power and its adjoining multilayered competitions between operating and rising global super-powers. It will also observe contemporary Chinese feminist activism within the overarching process which posits the status of women as one of the standards of “civilization” pivotal for the placements of particular states, societies and cultures within the symbolic hierarchies of the modern world order. This framework will allow me to look at widely available English language media reports on the Feminist Five case in order to suggest why this particular stream of feminism – Chinese non-state sponsored feminist activism –has mobilized an extraordinarily strong transnational support, and to think about the implications that the unintended and often unattended connections to the political processes and actors may have for the feminist organizing.

Dusica Ristivojevic is a Visiting Researcher at the Department of Philosophy, History, Culture and Arts Studies, Gender Studies Unit at the University of Helsinki. She holds a PhD in Comparative Gender Studies from the Central European University, she was a Lecturer in International Development and Gender Studies in South Korea and Hungary, and has worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica. Her main research interests include China’s re/positioning in the modern world order, the power dynamics in transnational social organizing, and the politics of women’s and human rights.

28.3. Pawel Leszkowicz (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies Fellow)
“New Media and Intimate Democracy in Eastern Europe: The Video Art of Female Homoeroticism”

The lecture discusses the aesthetics and politics   of feminist video art that addresses the question of female homoeroticism. The Polish  artist Izabella Gustowska and the Slovakian  artists  Anna Daučiková  deal with the themes of female-centered iconography and notion of homoeroticism. Both artists are considered  the  pioneers of feminist  video art that originated  in Central and Eastern Europe,  as they engaged with the medium of video in the 1980s, at the time of political and systemic transition in the region. The rise of gender consciousness in their art culminated in the revolutionary decade of transformations during the late Communism of the 1980s and the early Capitalism of the 1990s,  and coincided with the multimedia and video turn in their careers. Now, both are professors of new media and video art at  Fine Arts Academies, and have been instrumental in educating    generations of new media artists across the region and fostering feminist and queer approach in the visual arts.

Pawel Leszkowicz is an art  historian, academic and freelance curator  specializing in contemporary art, and transnational  LGBTQ studies. He is the author of the Ars Homo Erotica (2010) exhibition at Warsaw's National Museum. He has written four books: Helen Chadwick. The Iconography of Subjectivity (2001), Love and Democracy. Reflections on the Homosexual Question in Poland (2005),  Art Pride. Gay Art from Poland (2010), and The Naked Man: The Male Nude in post-1945 Polish Art  (2012). Collaborating with a number of galleries and museums,  he has curated and co-organised several international  queer exhibitions and symposia: Love and Democracy (2006),  Vogue (2009),  Ars Homo Erotica (2010), Love is Love. Art as LGBTQ Activism from Britain to Belarus  (2011), Civil Partnerships. Feminist and Queer Art and Activism in the UK (2012),   Exhibitionism: A Symposium on Queer Curatorial Practices in the UK (2011), A Symposium on  Contemporary Queer Art in the UK (2012). He was a  Marie Curie Research Fellow at the University of Sussex and the University of Brighton and currently is a Senior Fulbright  Research Fellow at One Gay and Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries, working on a project “Queer Subjectivity, Community, and Artistic Expression: An Art Historical, Archival, and Curatorial Study of  LGBTQ Art and Politics in California”

25.4. Marjut Jyrkinen (Associate Professor in Work-life Equality and Gender Studies, University of Helsinki)
"Women Managers in Gendered and Sexualised Workplaces: “MyManagement” coping strategies and reconstructuring of gender"

Finland is a country which enjoys an international reputation for gender equality, but across this research data women recounted numerous examples of how they navigate working life to manage sexualised and discriminatory encounters and comments. Women reported feeling under constant surveillance for their looks, dress, and behaviours in and outside the workplace. Further, ageing brought with it challenges to remain energetic and youthful and enhance the image of the organisation. Although a considerable body of research exists on (gendered) aesthetic labor at work in service and hospitality work, there is a limited data on this in business and middle management. With an ageing workforce, and women continuing to encounter pressures with their physical appearance, behaviors and dress, they continually develop ways to negotiate their careers. When gender discrimination intersects with ageism in organisations, the resulting gendered ageism can take many forms. Data illustrates the myriad ways of gendered ageism women managers encounter by men, but also sometimes by other women (Jyrkinen 2014; Jyrkinen & McKie 2012). We propose the concept of ‘MyManagement’ as a self-technology to denote the ways how women manage workplace relationships, working life, and career development as organisational practices remain gendered (McKie & Jyrkinen 2017, forthcoming).

Key words: Women managers, aesthetic labour, age and gendered ageism, gendered practices, compliance, resistance

McKie, L. & Jyrkinen, M. (forthcoming 2017) ‘”MyManagement”. Women Managers in Gendered and Sexualised Workplaces’, in Gender in Management: An International Journal.

Jyrkinen, M. (2014) ‘Women Managers, Careers and Gendered Ageism’, Scandinavian Journal of Management. An International Journal, 30(2), pp. 175-185.

Jyrkinen, M. & McKie, L. (2012) ‘Gender, Age and Ageism: Experiences of Women Managers in Two EU Countries’, Work, Employment and Society, 26(1), pp. 61-77.

Marjut Jyrkinen is Associate Professor in Work-life Equality and Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki (tenure track), and Research Director of the Social and Economic Sustainability of Future Working Life research consortium (weallfinland.fi). The WeAll consortium is funded by the Strategic Research Council at the Academy of Finland. Jyrkinen’s current research addresses sustainability of working life; gendered care and violations; feminist organisational and leadership ethics; and intersectionalities of gender, age, and ethnicity in management and organisations.

30.5. Jack Halberstam (Professor, University of Southern California)
“TRANS*: A Quick and Quirky Account of Gender Variance”

In the last decade, public discussions of transgenderism have increased exponentially. What was once regarded as an unusual or even unfortunate disorder has become an accepted articulation of gendered embodiment as well as a new site for political activism. How did a stigmatized identity become so central to US and European articulations of self and other? What fuels the continued fascination with transgender embodiment and how has the recognition of its legitimacy changed current gender protocols in the US? What is the history of gender and how does it sit alongside histories of sexuality, race, ability and health?

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AUTUMN TERM 2016

13 September, Josephine Hoegaerts (Research Fellow, Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies): Articulating Masculinity – The Citizen's Voice in the Making in the Nineteenth Century

27 September, Marie-Andrée Jacob (Professor, Keele Law School), Anna-Maria Tapaninen (Dr., Anthropology, University of Eastern Finland) and Antu Sorainen (Docent, Gender Studies, University of Helsinki)): Future of Kinship! – The Launch Discussion of the Contrasting and Re-Imagining Margins of Kinship Project (CoreKin)

12 October (Wednesday), Hanne-Marlene Dahl (Professor, Roskilde University, Society and Globalization): Gendered Governance – What is it? And how can we study it?

8 November, Joanna Mizielinska (Associate Professor, Sociology at the Warsaw School of Social Sciences and Humanities): Families of Choice in Poland

22 November, Sara Edenheim (University Lecturer, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS) Umeå University): Lost and Never Found – The Queer Archive of Feelings and Its Historical Propriety

PLEASE SEE BELOW FOR ABSTRACTS AND MORE INFORMATION

13.9. JOSEPHINE HOEGAERTS (Research Fellow, HCAS Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies)
"Articulating Masculinity: the Citizen's Voice in the Making in the Nineteenth Century"

Masculinity has generally been theorized as an identity "quietly assumed rather than explicitly articulated" (Dudink, 2012). In histories of nationbuilding and nationalism in particular, masculinity usually remains unmarked, difficult to find in source-material as it was hidden in seemingly universal categories such as 'mankind' and rarely questioned as a qualifier of soldierdom or citizenship.
In this talk, I argue that articulations of masculinity can be recovered from the nineteenth century 'national' archive. Interpreting the practice of articulation literally (i.e. as an acoustic practice), can lead us to an aspect of the embodiment of gendered identities that is often hidden by the mute nature of archival material: that of vocalization. Using the case of the process of nationbuilding in Belgium, I will show how citizenship was spoken and sung in explicitly gendered ways throughout the nineteenth century. The talk is based on my recently published monograph on histories of citizenship in Belgium, which takes three 'spaces' in which both masculinity and nationhood were represented, acquired and performed as its point of departure: the (primary) school for boys, the army and parliament. These places were exclusively accessible to men, and in all three of them, vocalization played an important role in imparting knowledge about the nation, representing oneself as part of that nation, and articulating citizenship.

Josephine Hoegaerts is a Core Research Fellow at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, and the author of Masculinity and Nationhood, 1830-1910, Constructions of Identity and Citizenship in Belgium (Palgrave, 2014). In her current work, she studies the history of the human voice. Focusing mainly on practices of voice formation and improvement, she analyses how the voices of children and adults were formed, trained and differentiated by medically and musically trained professionals throughout the nineteenth century. Recent publications include "Speaking like Intelligent Men: Vocal Articulations of Authority and Identity in the House of Commons in the Nineteenth Century", in: Radical History Review, 121, (2015) 123-144 and "Recording the Subaltern's Speech: Children's Voices in the Antwerp School Archives, ca.1850-1905" in: BTNG, XLVI, 1, (2016), 10-31.

27.9. MARIE-ANDRÉE JACOB (Professor, School of Law, University of Keele), ANNA-MARIA TAPANINEN (Research Fellow, Anthropology, University of Eastern Finland) and ANTU SORAINEN (Academy Research Fellow, Gender Studies, University of Helsinki):
"Future of Kinship!" – The Launch Discussion of the Contrasting and Re-Imagining Margins of Kinship Project (CoreKin)

Kinship is both a (self-evident/naturalized) social category and a complicated and contested theoretical concept.
Our conversation between three leading scholars in the fields of law, gender studies, anthropology and sexualities seeks to open up what is conventionally seen as the "new" in family configurations or the "marginalised" in kinship. The discussants maintain that both the idea of novelty and the illegitimate emerge from an evolved predisposition to attend to the so-called Euro-American kinship model. Not only is this model based on heterosexual relatedness, marriage and blood relations but also certain understandings of class, whiteness and relationship form.
Focusing particularly on the theories of kinship, sexuality and law as they interact with studies of relatedness, family and care, the discussants posit that care and support relations are a process of individual lives and historical "events"; not only in how they are affected by and embedded in the state policies and economic currencies but also in how they resist and redescribe norms and state powers.
By reimagining new ways to reroute the question of "what kinship is all about" the conversants touch the real-world problems, based on the unique empirical research done by each of them. They suggest to find and contrast the off-scene, the illegitimate and the unusual over the future course on research on kinship by investigating domestic domains and the more encompassing legal, political and economic domains in different societies through quantitative and qualitative empirical data, linked to diverse forms of state and political power.
In this way, the conversation looks to provide future insights on how kinship norms that affect care relations in the margins could be re-imagined through a brave recoupling and rerouting of such variegated frameworks as legislation, economics, politics, sexualities, queer, ethnography and gender.

Marie-Andrée Jacob is Professor of Law at Keele University. Her socio-legal work is strongly interdisciplinary, drawing on ethnographic and more recently on archival methods. In 2010 she received the Article Prize of the Socio-Legal Studies Association for 'The Shared History': unknotting fictive kinship and legal process' (Law & Society Review). Her book "Matching Organs with Donors: Legality and Kinship in Transplants" was published in 2012 by the University of Pennsylvania Press. As part of her current research on the category of research integrity, Marie explores modern patterns in the documentation of research regulation and conducts ethnographic observations in the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). In 2016-8, she is working on a Leverhulme Research Fellowship, 'Figuring 'bad apples': legal-bureaucratic assemblages of research misconduct, 1850-1990.'

Anna-Maria Tapaninen currently works as research fellow Department of Social Sciences at the University of Eastern Finland. Dr. Tapaninen is a one of the leading thinkers and teachers on anthropological studies of kinship in Finland. She has carried out archival research on institutional child abandonment in 19th century Europe, Naples in particular. She has studied the use of DNA testing for family reunification in the project DNA and Immigration: Social, political and ethical implications of DNA analysis for family reunification (IMMIGENE) supported by the Academy of Finland and currently in the project Bodies of Evidence: Interplay of documents, narratives and biotechnologies (funded by the Kone Foundation) . Anna-Maria co-edited a book on family reunification (2016), and has published widely on the topic.

Antu Sorainen is an Academy Fellow and Docent in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. She has conducted empirical studies in lesbian court cases and queer inheritance practices, and published work on sexualities in law and urban space. She is the co-author of an anthology on the contingent conceptual history of Sittlichkeit in Finland (with Tuija Pulkkinen). She currently holds a 5-year Academy of Finland Fellowship for a project entitled "Wills and Inheritance Practices in Sexually Marginalised Groups". She is the Director of the research project "CoreKin – Contrasting and Re-Imagining Margins of Kinship" (2016-2020, Academy of Finland).
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12.10. HANNE-MARLENE DAHL (Professor, Roskilde University, Society and Globalization)
"Gendered Governance – What is it? And how can we study it?"

A lot has been written about women in politics and gendering as a social and political process of subject production. Although these are important themes of research, I will argue that we also need to study contemporary forms of governance from a different, feminist position, that of gendered governance. Redirecting our attention to the way gendered governance works out (also in different national contexts), I outline an analytical framework for studying it. Gendered governance is a theoretical perspective to study (androgynous) discourses from a feminist perspective being attentive to struggles, silencing and valorizations. I give examples of how it is played out in the framings and policy instruments of neo-liberalism in care.

Hanne Marlene Dahl is a professor at the Dept. of Social Science and Business at Roskilde University. She works with the state and the governance of care, primarily elderly care in a context of the Nordic welfare state. Increasingly, governance of care is about the travelling of discourses between different institutional levels such as international organizations, national and sub-national levels and it involves struggles between and at various levels including resistance and silencing citizens. Dahl studies the logics in the neo-liberal governance of care, their relationship, translation and implications for professional carers, care workers as well as the recipients of care. Dahl has participated in national, European and international research projects, co-edited two books 'Dilemmas of Care in the Nordic Welfare State – Continuity and Change' and 'Europeanization, Care and Gender: Global Complexities' and published widely in international journals. She is currently writing a book entitled "Struggles about (Elderly) care – a feminist View" for Palgrave to be published in the beginning of 2017.

8.11. JOANNA MIZIELINSKA (Associate Professor, Sociology at the Warsaw School of Social Sciences and Humanities)
"Families of Choice in Poland"

The subject of my lecture is rooted in many sources. First, it goes back to my previous work on the translation of queer theory into non-Anglo-American context and de-centring Western sexualities. In a way, it is about "diagnosing" the situation of hegemonic over-determination of non-Anglo-American queer studies by Anglo-American one. Second, it is mostly based on my recently finished research project on "Families of choice in Poland" which was 3 years (2013-2016) multi-method research concentrated on daily life of non-heterosexual families. Its findings often contest Western theories of same-sex intimacies and relationships. Instead they demonstrate how theoretical tools developed in different geo-temporal context need to be tailored to the lived experience of participants. Social factors that have impact on family and intimate life of non-heterosexual people are embedded in their local context and shaped by specific understandings of what it means to build a family and gain any forms of recognition. On chosen examples from the fieldwork I want to demonstrate how certain concepts born in the Anglo-American contexts and described in books on queer families/kinship do (not) work in different geo-temporal realities or work differently. Therefore, the aim of my lecture is twofold. First, to highlight how geo-temporal conditions shape LGBTQ intimate and family experience and as such unsettle dominant Western knowledge on queer kinship. And second, to show the urgent need for a greater attentiveness to spatial and temporal choices in any theorising on queer family and intimate lives.

Joanna Mizielinska is Associate Professor at the Institute of Psychology of the Polish Academy of Sciences and Principal Investigator of the project Families of Choice in Poland (2013-2016),which is the first multi-method project on non-heterosexual families in Poland. Her work moves in a large area of intimate relations, gender and sexual politics, and she has published widely on queer families, empirical studies on relatedness, post-social sexualities and translations of queer theory. Specialist on the CEE sexualities, she works currently on the politics of family in Anglo-Saxon queer theory. She is an expert in LGBTIQ issues, conducting qualitative and quantitative research which demanded close co-operation with various LGBTIQ groups and organisations. Previously she worked for the University of Social Sciences and Humanities from 2006-2013 as an Associate Professor at the Institute of Sociology (2009-2013) and as a Director of that Institute (2012). She was a Fullbright scholar at Princeton University, where she worked under the supervision of Professor Judith Butler. Joanna has also been a visiting researcher in the Helsinki University as well as in Sweden. She has published the book Families of choice in Poland. Family life of nonheterosexual persons (with Marta Abramowicz and Agata Stasińska, 2015), co-edited De-Centring Western Sexualities: Central and Eastern European Perspective (with Robert Kulpa, 2011) and edited a special issue of lambda nordica "in transition?: central/eastern European sexualities" (2012).

22.11. SARA EDENHEIM (University Lecturer, Umeå centrum för genusstudier (UCGS) Umeå University)
"Lost and Never Found – The Queer Archive of Feelings and Its Historical Propriety"

In research and activism concerning the queer archive-of-feelings, few historians have openly engaged in the discussion on the limits and possibilities of the archive per se. As an historian, I want to provide a critical perspective on this debate and an analysis of historicity, historical methodology and, foremost, fantasy. Is there really such an unambiguous difference between the historian's view on the traditional archive, filled with bureaucratic waste, and the assumed radical archive-of-feelings, consisting of ephemerals and "feelings"? Is it not with the future in mind that both the historian and the queer archivist insist on conserving documents and feelings alike?

Through an analysis of an art exhibition, described by the curators as presenting a unique and radical queer archival activism that disdains the traditional archive for excluding (queer) feelings, I reach a different conclusion where the traditional archive may be seen in a new light: or rather, in a new darkness, where the implications of the (Lacanian) negativity on queer theory and politics are addressed and a too 'future-oriented' version, foremost represented by Halberstam, is criticized.

Sara Edenheim is a senior lecturer at Umeå Centre for Gender Studies, Umeå University, Sweden and associate professor in History from Lund University, Sweden. Her recent publications in English are "Representations of Equality: Processes of Depoliticization of the Citizen-Subject", in Gendered Citizenship and the Politics of Representation (co-authored with Malin Rönnblom) (2016); "Performativity as a symptom: the trembling body in the works of Judith Butler", Lambda Nordica vol. 20 (2015) "Lost and Never Found: The Queer Archive of Feelings and Its Historical Propriety", differences 24:3 (2014).

SPRING TERM 2016

31.5. Professor Birte Siim (University of Aalborg)
"Reframing Democracy – intersectional and transnational challenges"

This presentation will explore the theoretical and normative challenges to reframe feminist approaches to democracy from intersectional and transnational perspectives and present empirical findings from EU research projects. The recent economic crisis has inspired debates about equality and justice within and beyond the nation state and about the abilities of transnational civil society actors to influence the political agenda. Feminist scholarship has started to explore intersections of gender, class and diversity at national and transnational levels and to reframe feminist approaches to gender equality and justice. The intersectional challenges to democracy include debates about gender, class and ethnicity/race; about participation/ representation and redistribution; about politics and economics. The transnational challenges include debates about intersections of democracy within the nation state with supra-national EU and global governance.

Birte Siim is political scientist and Professor in Gender Research in the Social Sciences, Dept. of Culture and Global Studies, Aalborg University (AAU), Denmark. Her publications on democracy and citizenship include: Gender Diversities – Practicing Intersectionality in the European Union. Ethnicities. 2014 (14) 4 (with L. Rolandsen Agustin); “Political Intersectionality and Democratic Politics in the European Public Sphere”, Politics & Gender, 2014 (10) 01; “Conflicts and Negotiations about Framings of Gender and Ethnicity by Political Actors in the European Public Sphere”; Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy, 2014 (30) 1; Negotiations of Gender and Diversity in an Emergent European Public Sphere (ed. with M. Mokre), Palgrave/Macmillan 2013; “Citizenship” in K. Celis, V. Waylen (ed.), The Oxford Handbook on Gender and Politics, OUP, 2013;  Gender and Citizenship – Politics and Agency in France, Britain and Denmark (CUP 2000). Her current work focuses on intersectionality/diversity, migration/multiculturalism, (trans) nationalism.

19.4. Professor Susanne Bost  (Professor, Loyola University, Chicago)
"Memoir Beyond the Self: Animal, Vegetable, and Digital Ecologies in the Work of Aurora Levins Morales"

The Puerto Rican poet, essayist, and activist Aurora Levins Morales, whose work revolves around communal authorship, narrative therapy, and digital exchange, teaches us how to think more expansively about the function of literature as well as the nature of the human subject.  Her writings about living with multiple chemical sensitivity disorder portray a body whose health is intertwined with a broad ecosystem that includes plants, animals, and chemical toxins as well as the digital ecosystem where she builds corporeal and digital networks.  Her website, www.auroralevinsmorales.com, forms healing communities by blogging, selling books, and seeking donations to support the author’s body, her writing, and her efforts to build a non-toxic home.  The webs Levins Morales creates there are both prehuman – forged in an indigenous Taíno cosmology and a desire for “organic” connection – as well as posthuman.  My talk will explore the ethical and political possibilities of approaching human life as an inclusive ecology built on relationships across space and across species.

Suzanne Bost is Professor of English, and Graduate Program Director in Women’s and Gender Studies, at Loyola University Chicago.  She is the author of two books, Mulattas and Mestizas: Representing Mixed Identities in the Americas, 1850-2000 and Encarnación: Illness and Body Politics in Chicana Feminist Literature, and she recently co-edited, with Frances Aparicio, The Routledge Companion to Latino/a Literature.  Her current work focuses the Gloria Anzaldúa archive, New Materialisms, posthumanism, memoir, and yoga.

12.4. Professor Rosie Harding (Birmingham Law School)
"Shouldering and Sharing the Burdens of Care: Relationality, Vulnerability and Dementia"

In this talk, which is drawn from a larger monograph project, I explore carers’ experiences of the material, social andemotional investments involved in caring for a family member with dementia. I explore these through an interrogation of feminist care ethics and relational approaches to care, and take account of the antagonistic character of both care giving and care receiving to highlight the limitations of our conceptual understandings of care in terms of how caring relationships happen in the “real world”.I draw in perspectives from feminist literature addressing vulnerability and relationality to help to propose a way forward where care is not considered to be primarily the responsibility of the private family, but as a collective good and a collective responsibility.

Professor Rosie Harding is Chair in Law and Society at the University of Birmingham, UK. She gained her LLB from the University of Edinburgh, her LLM from Keele University and her PhD from the University of Kent. Her research focuses on the everyday regulation and legal recognition of intimate and caring relationships. She uses social science methods including both qualitative and quantitative approaches to investigate the place of law in everyday life, including everyday understandings of law and legal discourse. Her work is grounded in feminist legal theory and gender, sexuality and law, and has been supported by research grants from the AHRC, ESRC and the British Academy. Her first book, Regulating Sexuality won the 2011 SLSA-Hart Book Prize and the 2011 SLSA-Hart Early Career Prize. Her current monograph project, Duties to Care: Relationality, Dementia and Law  (forthcoming, Cambridge University Press) explores carers experiences of navigating the complex regulatory systems that surround health and social care when supporting a family member with dementia.

15.3. Tutkimusjohtaja Marjut Jyrkinen ja tutkijatohtori Tytti Steel
"Askelia kohti tasa-arvoisempaa työelämää
"

Tutkimusjohtaja Marjut Jyrkinen ja tutkijatohtori Tytti Steel esittelevät käynnistysvaiheessa olevaa hanketta Yhteiskunnallisesti ja taloudellisesti kestävä tulevaisuuden työelämä: politiikat ja toimintakäytännöt, tasa-arvo ja risteävät erot Suomessa (WeAll). Hanketta rahoittaa Suomen Akatemian yhteydessä toimiva strategisen tutkimuksen neuvosto. WeAll –hankkeen tutkimustiimi muodostuu monitieteisestä tutkimusryhmästä. Hankeessa ovat mukana HY (Sukupuolentutkimus ja Ruralia-instituutti), Hanken ja Jyväskylän yliopisto.

Tutkimushankkeessa tarkastelemme, miten päällekkäiset ja risteävät sosiaaliset kategoriat, kuten ikä, sukupuoli, sosiaalinen asema, etnisyys, seksuaalinen suuntautuminen ja asuinpaikka, rakentavat epätasa-arvoisuuksia, etuasemia ja marginalisaatiota muuttuvassa työelämässä ja työn ja muun elämän rajapinnoilla. Haemme ratkaisua seuraavaan ongelmaan: Millaiset organisatoriset ja yhteiskunnalliset tekijät ja johtajuus yhtäältä tukevat ja toisaalta rajoittavat moninaisten ihmisryhmien mahdollisuuksia työelämässä ja mahdollisuuksien muuttumista toiminnaksi siten, että hyvinvointi ja tasa-arvo toteutuvat? Kristiina-tutkimuseminaarissa keskitymme erityisesti maahanmuuttajuuteen, ikään ja sukupuoleen liittyviin risteäviin eroihin.

1.3. Anna Elomäki (Postdoctoral researcher, University of Helsinki, Gender Studies)
"Economization of gender equality discourse and policy in the European Union"

Scholarship on gender and the European Union (EU) has consistently pointed out that EU gender equality policies have always been embedded in the logic of the market. I provide novel insights into this discussion by arguing that the neoliberal economization of EU gender equality discourses and policies has intensified in the aftermath of the economic crisis. In this presentation, I discuss two examples of this intensification. First, EU institutions have, since 2008, developed and promoted a market-oriented gender equality discourse, “the economic case for gender equality”, which draws attention to the macroeconomic benefits of gender equality. The economic case reaffirms the gender-biased assumptions of neoclassical economic theory and legitimizes the EU’s current economic priorities and policies, many of which are detrimental to gender equality. My second example is the increasing EU-level interest in pushing women in economic decision-making positions and the proposed EU directive on gender balance in corporate boards. Although boardroom quotas regulate markets and corporations in the name of gender equality in a non-neoliberal manner, the debate about them is saturated with neoliberal rationality, which economizes the policy problem and the goals and subjects of the policy. As a result the policy debate puts forward depoliticized understandings of gender, the economy and decision-making subjects.

Anna Elomäki is a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Helsinki and holds a Ph.D. in gender studies. Her research interests lie in the field of feminist political theory, and her current research focuses on the neoliberalization of gender equality policies and advocacy and in the European Union and the effects of austerity on feminist politics.

2.2. Annemie Halsema (Professor, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Philosophy),
"The Subject of Critique. Ricoeur in Dialogue with Feminist Philosophers"

Paul Ricoeur is one of the most important philosophical anthropologists of the 20th century. He develops an extensive notion of the self from different sources: the analytical discussion about personal identity, contemporary theories of narrativity, classical philosophical
sources, such as Aristotle, and contemporary phenomenology and hermeneutics. The notion of the self also is one of the central points of debate in feminist theory. Yet, feminists seldom relate to Ricoeur’s philosophy of the self.
This paper aims to show the relevance of his notion of the self for postmodern feminist theory, but also to critically assess it. By bringing Ricoeur’s “self” into dialogue with Braidotti’s, Irigaray’s and Butler’s conceptions of the subject, it shows that both notions are close in that the self is are articulated into language, embodied and not fully conscious of itself. In the course of the argument, the major point of divergence also comes to light, namely, that Ricoeur considers discourse to be a laboratory for thought experiments, while the feminist thinkers consider discourse to be normative, restrictive and exclusive. In the second part of the paper the possibility of critique and change are further developed. Ricoeur does not rule out critique, rather interpretation includes distanciation and critique. Finally, his notion of productive imagination explains how new identifications become possible.

Annemie Halsema (PhD in philosophy, University of Amsterdam) is Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Humanities/Department of Philosophy of Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Her research interests are in the field of phenomenology, hermeneutics and feminist philosophy, and concern the themes of (narrative) identity, embodiment, ethics, alterity. She published two books on Luce Irigaray: Luce Irigaray: Dialectiek van de seksuele differentie (1998) and Luce Irigaray and Horizontal Transcendence (2010), and edited Empowering Humanity. State of the Art of Humanistics (with Douwe van Houten, 2002), books with Dutch translations of Judith Butler, of Michel Foucault, and a historical overview of female philosophers: Vrouwelijke filosofen. Een historisch overzicht. She published several articles on Irigaray, Ricœur and feminist theory, such as: ‘Understanding the Body. The Relevance of Gadamer’s and Ricœur’s View of the Body for Feminist Theory’ (with Louise Derksen, 2011); ‘The Time of the Self. A Feminist Reflection on Ricœur’s Notion of Narrative Identity’ (2011); “The Subject of Critique. Ricœur in Dialogue with Feminist Philosophers” (2013).

19.1. Jemima Repo (Newcaste University)
”The Biopolitical Origins of Gender Theory”

In this talk, based on her recent book The Biopolitics of Gender, Repo argues for the need to analyse gender not only discursively, but also genealogically and biopolitically. By contrast to Butler’s genealogy of gender ontology that entails a critique of the contingent constructions of sex, it is possible to convieve of the idea of gender itself as a historically specific strategic formation. Just as Foucault conceived of sexuality as a historically situated discourse deployed to discipline the body and manage populations, this lecture traces the deployment of the idea of gender to the work of postwar psychiatrists researching and conducting ‘corrective’ surgeries on the bodies of intersexed children born with sexually ambiguous genitalia. This violent past and the uncritical appropriation of these ideas by 1970s feminists poses pressing questions for feminist theory and politics today, especially regarding the extent to which ‘gender’ can be taken for granted as an emancipatory concept.

Jemima Repo is Lecturer in the Politics of Gender at Newcastle University, UK. She received her PhD at the University of Helsinki in 2012 and her publications on biopolitics, gender theory, demographic politics, violence and celebrity politics include her book The Biopolitics of Gender (2015, OUP) and articles published in journals such as Social Politics, Contemporary Poliitcal Theory, Theory & Event, Feminist Theory, International Feminist Journal of Politics and European Journal of Women’s Studies.

FALL TERM 2015

10.12. Professor Sue Scott (FAcSS), Centre for Women’s Studies, University of York (UK) and Visiting Professor University of HelsinkI
"Problematizing the Specialness of Sex"

This ‘Masterclass’ will focus on aspects of sexuality through feminist understandings of gender. Sexuality is commonly understood as a special, exotic or problematic area of social life and much feminist and sociological research has focused on problematizing violent and abusive, male heterosexual, behavior, and/or exploring the emergence sexual ‘identities’ and societal responses to these. Here I will take a slightly different approach by exploring both everyday and mundane sexual practices and the challenging issue of children/childhood and sexuality and the interconnections between them. I will argue for the further development of historically and culturally grounded research underpinned by the continued feminist theorisations of gender.

Professor Sue Scott is a sociologist and feminist with specialist interests in gender, sexuality and the body and Childhood. She has published widely on these topics including (with Stevi Jackson) Theorizing Sexuality, Open University Press 2010. Sue currently holds an Honorary Professorship at York, is an Honorary Professorial Fellow at Edinburgh and a Visiting Professor at the University of Helsinki. Sue is Co Managing Editor of Discover Society http://discoversociety.org. In an academic career spanning 35 years Sue has held academic posts at a number of UK Universities including Cambridge and Manchester. She has been a Professor at the Universities of Stirling 197-99 and Durham 1999-2005. At the latter she was also Postgraduate Dean. More recently she has been Executive Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences at Keele University and from 2009-12 Pro Vice Chancellor (Research) at Glasgow Caledonian University. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and Chair of the European Sociological Association’s Council of National Associations.

3.11. Professor Eka Srimulayani (State Institute of Islamic Studies, Banda Aceh, Indonesia)
”Are women ‘peace agents’?  A reflection of women’s involvement of Aceh peace building in Indonesia”

2015 celebrates the 10th anniversary of the Helsinki Memorandum of Understanding, peace agreement signed between the Aceh Independent Movement and Indonesian government, ending the armed conflict that started in 1976. This nearly three decades long armed conflict has affected the vulnerable groups of the society such as women and children. However, on the other hand, in a number of armed conflicts, women are perceived as peacemakers.

This presentation will try to answer the question whether women are agents of peace by reflecting the observations and interviews with the local women’s groups, peace maker activist as well as political and religious leaders, especially during the period of 1990s onward.  The presentation will draw light into the dynamics of women’s movement in Aceh, their networks, prospects and remaining challenges, especially in relation to the armed conflict and the peace building efforts.

Eka Srimulyani is a professor of sociology at The State Islamic University of Ar-Raniry Banda Aceh Indonesia, and a senior researcher at The International Centre for Aceh and Indian Ocean Studies, Banda Aceh Indonesia. Among her publications is Women from Traditional Islamic Educational Institutions in Indonesia: Negotiating Public Spaces published by Amsterdam University Press, 2012, and ”Gender in contemporary Acehnese dayah: moving beyond docile agency?” in Bianca J. Smith and Marck Woodward (eds),   Gender and Power in Indonesian Islam: Leaders,  Feminist, Sufist, and Pesantren Selves, Asia Women Series, Routledge, 2014.

20.10.  Professor Melanie Hughes (University of  Pittsburgin, USA)
"Single-Axis Politics and the Political Dominance of Men from Majority Ethnic Groups"

Over time, politicians elected to national office have become increasingly diverse. Nevertheless, men from majority racial, ethnic, and religious groups continue to dominate national politics in most democratic countries. One of the ways the status quo of majority men’s political overrepresentation is maintained is through what I call single-axis politics. Political attention directed towards one axis of identity – e.g., ethnicity, gender – may deflect attention from other axes of inequality and help to stabilize majority men’s political dominance. In this presentation, I develop the concept of single-axis politics and its empirical applications. Looking over time, I show that the presence of long-standing ethnic representation policies reduces the likelihood that countries adopt national quotas for women in politics. Political attention to ethnicity may create substantial barriers to institutional change benefiting women, leaving majority men’s political dominance intact.

13.10 klo 16-18  FT Taru Leppänen (Turun yliopisto) ja FT Milla Tiainen (Helsingin yliopisto)
"Feministiset uusmaterialismit, paikallisuus ja musiikintutkimus"

Taru Leppänen on Turun yliopiston sukupuolentutkimuksen yliopistonlehtori, joka työskentelee tällä hetkellä Helsingin  yliopistossa tutkijana Suomen Akatemian rahoittamassa projektissa "Deleuzian Music Research.

Milla Tiainen toimii postdoc-tutkijana samassa projektissa. Hän myos opettaa tällä hetkellä Helsingin yliopiston FHKT-laitoksella musiikkitieteen oppiaineessa professori Pirkko Moisalan sijaisena.

29.9. Professor Annick Wibben (University of San Francisco, USA)
"Framing Feminist (Global) Politics – Shifting Foreign Policy, Security & War?"

In the last several years, feminist scholars of global politics have been challenging traditional frames of security, war and foreign policy suggesting that feminist alternatives would make for better policy options. After the success of Feminist Security Studies, more recently it has been Feminist Foreign Policy that has captured scholars' and practitioners' attention. This seminar considers the politics of these new feminist framings of security, war, foreign policy and asks whether they are really shifting the conversation on global politics. Maybe the work that speaks to policy in particular, because it tends to employ mostly liberal feminist frames and therefore an 'add women & stir' approach, does not constitute a fundamental challenge to global politics? If not, can there be a more principled or radical feminist response? And - what would such a challenge look like?

Annick T.R. Wibben is Associate Professor of Politics & International Studies and the chair of Peace and Justice Studies program at the University of San Francisco. Her research straddles (critical) security studies, international theory, and feminist international relations - she is probably best know for her work in the new field of Feminist Security Studies, but she also has a keen interest in issues of methodology, representation, and writing. Her monograph, Feminist Security Studies: A Narrative Approach was published in 2011 and a new, edited book Researching War: Feminist Methods, Ethics & Politics is forthcoming in 2016. She is actively engaged on twitter (@ATRWibben) and currently blogs on the Duck of Minerva (http://duckofminerva.com/).

23.9. Professor Cinzia Arruzza (Department of Philosophy, The New School for Social Research, USA)
The Gender of Capital: Women's Oppression and Capital's Reproduction

In this paper I argue in favor of a ‘unitary theory’ of gender oppression and capitalism, that is, an understanding of they relation that denies that patriarchy is still an autonomous system and that sees gender oppression today as, in the last instance, a consequence of the dynamic and logic proper to capitalist accumulation and the reproduction of capitalist societies. The paper has three parts. In the first part I briefly summarize two alternative approaches to the issue at stake: dual or triples systems theory, on the one hand, and what I label as the ‘indifferent capitalism’ thesis, on the other. In the second part I address two issues that are key to understanding in what way the kind of unitary theory I want to argue for in this paper differs from the ‘indifferent capitalism’ thesis: these two key issues are the relationship between logical and historical possibilities and the difference between logical preconditions and necessary consequences. In the third and conclusive part, I finally articulate the main theoretical lines of my version of unitary theory, challenging an understanding of Marx’s critique of political economy as based on purely economic categories. The aim of this paper is to articulate a version of the ‘unitary theory’ able to avoid the pitfalls of economic reductionism, functionalism, and determinism denounced both by post-structuralist critiques of orthodox Marxism and by the more heterodox tendencies within Marxist literature. 

Cinzia Arruzza is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Rome Tor Vergata and subsequently studied at the universities of Fribourg, and Bonn, where she was the recipient of an Alexander von Humboldt postdoctoral fellowship. She is the author of Les Mésaventures de la théodicée. Plotin, Origène et Grégoire de Nysse,  (Turnhout 2011), Dangerous Liaisons, Marriages and Divorces of Marxism and Feminism (London 2013), and Plotinus. Ennead II 5. On What is Potentially and What Actually. Translation with an Introduction and Commentary (Las Vegas 2015).

8.9. Professor Ellen Koskoff (Eastman School of Music, USA):
"What is a Feminist Ethnomusicology? Sharing the Common Theoretical Bedrock”

Ellen Koskoff is a professor of ethnomusicology at the University of Rochester's Eastman School of Music and the director of ethnomusicology program there. Her writings about jewish music, gender and music, and music cognition are widely published. Her work includes "Women and music in cross-cultural perspective" (1987), "Music in Lubavitcher life" (2000) and "A Feminist ethnomusicology" (2014). She is a former President of the Society for ethnomusicology and is currently serving as the editor of the society's journal, Ethnomusicology.

SPRING TERM 2015

Moya Lloyd, Professor of Political Theory, Loughborough University, UK
Title of presentation: Vulnerability, Grievability, and the Body

The body has always had a central place in the work of Judith Butler from her earliest writings onwards. Nevertheless, what she understands by the term has shifted and evolved over time. In this paper, I want to explore her recent reconceptualisation of the corpus as socially ecstatic and her ensuing attempts to articulate a so-called ‘new body politics’ divested of (problematic) ideas of individual autonomy. I am particularly interested, in this context, in how Butler treats the notion of vulnerability, especially given the place of this concept in feminist theory. Against those readings that suggest that she identifies vulnerability exclusively with injurability, and thence with a suspect form of humanism predicated on finitude, I will show that, for her, vulnerability refers not just to susceptibility to harm; it also, perhaps more importantly, signals openness to the other, an openness that functions as the condition of (im)possibility for politics (and ethics). To evaluate what it means to perform embodied gender politics in conditions of precarity, I will turn my attention to Butler’s understanding of ‘grievability’, its connection with the notion of the liveable life, and how both relate to normative idea(l)s of ‘the human’.

Moya Lloyd is Professor of Political Theory at Loughborough University, UK. She has written widely in the area of feminist political theory, particularly on the work of Judith Butler, as well as on questions of identity politics, sexuality, radical democracy, and the body. She is the author of Beyond Identity Politics: feminism, power, and politics (2005) and Judith Butler: from norms to politics (2007), and the editor of the forthcoming volume Butler and Ethics (2015). She is a former Deputy Director of the Centre for the Advancement of Women in Politics at Queen’s University, Belfast. She currently holds a three-year Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship for a project entitled: ‘Who counts? The political problem of the “human”’.

Professor Sigríður Þorgeirsdóttir (Sigridur Thorgeirsdottir), Jane and Aatos Erkko Professor. Helsinki Collegium of Advanced Studies.
Title of presentaton: Philosophy of the Body Beyond Politics of Difference

The body has been one of the grand discoveries of 20th century philosophy. Friedrich Nietzsche´s philosophy of the body and the embodied self has been a stepping stone for feminist philosophies, influencing different versions of feminisms such as the difference feminism of Luce Irigaray and the queer feminism of Judith Butler. 
Butler´s philosophy has been especially influential as a theory underlying politics of difference. The politics of difference have been important for human rights struggles, yet lack aspects of commonalities (material and embodied) that are crucial for present day global politics. I will discuss how a material based philosophy of embodiment offers theoretical means to extend a politics of difference to a politics of commonalities.

Sigridur Thorgeirsdottir is a professor of philosophy at the University of Iceland and presently Jane and Aatos Erkko Professor at Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies. She studied philosophy in Boston and Berlin. She has published books on the philosophies of Nietzsche and Arendt, feminist philosophy, philosophy of embodiment, Beauvoir, and women in the history of philosophy. She is member of the board of FISP (International Federation of Philosophical Societies) and chair of its gender committee, and she is one of the founders and first chair of board of the United Nations University GEST Programme, a transnational studies and training program in gender equality.

Linda McKie, Professor, Head of School, Applied Social Sciences, Durham University
Title of presentation: Researching Families, Violence and Social Change

Linda McKie is Professor of Sociology at the School of Applied Social Sciences, Durham University, UK. She is also an Associate Director of the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, University of Edinburgh. Linda has published over 120 peer reviewed articles, books and chapters and been a member of the editorial boards for a range of journals including Sociology, Sociology of Health and Illness, and Work, Employment and Society. Linda is passionate in her support for early career colleagues and runs regular writing courses and retreats on planning and writing publications and research proposals. In 2004 she was elected to the UK Academy of Social sciences and was a member of the Sociology Unit of Assessment Panel for the UK Research Assessment Framework in 2014.

Lisa Adkins, Professor Newcastle University Australia / FiDiPro professor University of Tampere & University of Turku
Title of presentation: What Can Money Do? Feminist Theory in Austere Times

What can money do? Can it be put to work to address deepening forms of social and economic inequality associated with the financial crisis, recession and still unfolding politics of austerity? Can we have faith in money as an injustice remedying substance in a crisis ridden and yet still thoroughly financialized reality? While the latter scenario is implied in recent feminist calls to redistribute resources to redress widening socio-economic inequalities under austerity, in this talk I suggest that such a redistributive logic fails to account for the shifting capacities of resources, including the capacities of money. To track these shifting capacities, I revisit the demands of the 1970s women’s liberation movement and especially the assumptions at play in these demands that money both measure and distribute justice. While these assumptions were arguably politically efficacious in that moment, in the contemporary present pervasive financialization has involved a material transformation to the capacities of money, a transformation which, I will suggest, leaves its justice distributing potential in doubt. This talk therefore not only calls for careful exploration of the capacities of resources in analyses of crisis, recession and austerity but also for feminist theory to rethink redistributive justice in the light of such transformations. Central to these considerations is money in the wages form.        

Lisa Adkins is the BHP Billiton Chair of Sociology at the University of Newcastle, Australia and Academy of Finland Distinguished Professor (2015-2019). She is joint editor-in-chief of the journal Australian Feminist Studies (Routledge/Taylor & Francis). Widely published in the areas of social theory, feminist theory and economic sociology her recent research focuses on the restructuring of labour and shifts to the economy-society relation in post-Fordist capitalism. Publications from this research have appeared in South Atlantic Quarterly, Feminist Theory, NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research and Australian Feminist Studies. She has also recently contributed to debates concerning the reconstruction of social science through the volumes What is the Empirical? (2009; co-edited with Celia Lury) and Measure and Value (2012; co-edited with Celia Lury). She is convenor of the New Times: Transforming Feminist Political Economies international research network.

 

Kristiina Brunila, Kasvatuksen ja koulutuksen sosiaalisen oikeudenmukaisuuden ja tasa-arvon professori (tenure track), Helsingin yliopisto
’SINUN PITÄÄ NYT ASETTAA ITSESI KESKIÖÖN!’

Professuuri oikein hallinnan ja hanttiin pistämisen rajankäyntinä

Kristiina Brunila työskentelee kasvatuksen ja koulutuksen oikeudenmukaisuuden ja tasa-arvon professorina (tenure track) Helsingin yliopistossa. Hän on tutkimusryhmineen tutkinut kasvatuksen ja koulutuksen eriarvoisuutta koulutuspolitiikan ja koulutuksen käytäntöjen sekä vallan ja toimijuuden näkökulmista. Erityisenä kiinnostuksena on ollut tarkastella koulutuksen markkinoitumisen, terapisoitumisen ja tietokapitalismin seurauksia.

Esityksessään hän kuljeskelee erilaisten aineistojen kanssa ja sanallistaa ensimmäistä vuottaan professuurissa feministinä ja kriittistä tutkimusta tekevänä tutkijana ja opettajana.

 

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Peggy Watson, Helsinki Collegium of Advanced Studies Fellow, Univeristy of Helsinki
Title of presentation: The Polish Question: Post 9/11 Politics in Postcommunist Europe

After the cold war, and particularly since September 11, gender equality and sexuality have to a significant degree, come to constitute the ground of politics. ‘The true clash of civilisations… the cultural fault line that divides the West and the Muslim world..   is about sex’ (Inglehart and Norris 2003). I assert a ‘Polish question’, articulated in terms of gender equality and sexual liberation, which like the ‘Muslim question’ and other European questions, is about delineating European identity and difference and hence about circumscribing eligibility for citizenship. The paper is about the cultural representation of Europe, and within Poland the representation of modern ‘Europeanised’ Poles, that is secured through the othering of ‘Poland’ in dominant strands of liberal feminist rhetoric. I will identify (at least) two sites of this orientalising discourse by focusing on the Polish Congress of Women (Kongres Kobiet) and its shadow cabinet manifesto discourse, as well as mainstream feminist statements during the ‘gender crisis’ that split Poland in 2013-2014. Exploring the interrelationships between the symbolic and political economic dimensions of social change will help identify the circumstances under which a feminist discourse whose stated aims are progressive may produce new schemes of inequality, specifically through the production of class difference.

Peggy Watson is currently at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies.  She is Fellow and Director of Studies at Homerton College Cambridge and works at the Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge. Her research interests lie in the field of post- cold war studies,  she has a particular interest in Poland. During the cold war she worked at the Universities of Warsaw and Wroclaw for a number of years. From 2001 onwards she has directed the Nowa Huta Study, a long term study of social change in the former Stalinist new town. She has written a number of influential articles on gender , feminism, and health in eastern Europe. Currently she is working on a project about feminism as a mode of governmentality in Poland. Her most recent book is Health Care Reform and Globalisation: the US, China and Europe in Comparative Perspective, Routledge 2012.

Maryanne Dever, Professor, University of Newcastle, Australia
Title of presentation: Feminism’s Paper Trail

Where is feminism’s archive? The approaches to research that defined feminist archival practice in the 1980s and 1990s positioned ‘the archive’ (singular, monolithic) as the place where we routinely sought to ‘recover’ a past that we understood to have been ‘hidden from history’.  This tradition of archival research has been radically reshaped by recent trends in the Humanities. In this lecture I ask: where is feminism’s archive if it is not something we find fully formed and awaiting our interventions? Were we ever in it? Would we know it if we saw it now?  I explore how new approaches structured by concerns with materiality can yield different orders of insight into literary lives, literary works and their archival traces. I propose a new approach to how and why paper matters in archive-based literary research. I do so by drawing on experiences working with archived collections as diverse as Greta Garbo’s letters, the papers of second wave feminist activists, and those of writers Eve Langley and Valentine Ackland.

Maryanne Dever researches on questions of intimacy and materiality in relation to literary manuscripts and personal papers and she co-convenes the Archive Futures research network (www.archivefutures.com). She is co-author of The Intimate Archive (2009) and co-edited a 2014 special issue of Archives and Manuscripts on ‘Literary Archives, Materiality and the Digital’. She is currently joint Editor-in-Chief (with Lisa Adkins) of Australian Feminist Studies (Routledge/Taylor & Francis). She is a former ofDirector of the Centre for Women's Studies and Gender Research at Monash University in Melbourne and President of the Australian Women’s & Gender Studies Association (AWGSA) and is currently Associate Professor in the School of Humanities and Social Science at the University of Newcastle, Australia. In 2015 she is a Visiting Professor at the University of Tampere and at the University of Turku.

FALL TERM 2014

Rustom Bharucha, Professor of Theatre and Performance Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, India
Title of presentation: The Aftermath:  Reflections on Terror and Performance

Drawing on his recently published book Terror and Performance (Routledge 2014), Rustom Bharucha will probe the modalities and enigmas of one key question:  What happens when the performance ends?  The idea of ‘performance’ will be extended beyond theatre practice to encompass four primary sites of investigation:  ‘September 11’, Islamophobia, Truth and Reconciliation, and Non-Violence. 

Using a dialogic mode of inquiry, he will throw out questions relating to the relationship between ‘terror’ and ‘terrorism’, the ethical considerations involved in viewing the act of killing as ‘performance’, the efficacy of the Truth and Reconciliation process beyond the aporias of affect, and the ‘violence’ of non-violence.  These issues will be contextualized within a spectrum of practices including suicide bombing, lip-sewing , blood-graffiti, and peace activism. 

To what extent can theatre counter its complicities within a larger narrative of terror?  Is non-violence viable in an age of terror?  Can justice exist beyond – and against – the law?  These are some of the critical questions that will be raised in the lecture, which attempts to provide a reflective framework on the terror of our times.

Rustom Bharucha is Professor of Theatre and Performance Studies at the Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, India.  A leading interlocutor in the fields of interculturalism, secularism and oral history, he has written a number of books including Theatre and the World, The Question of Faith, In the Name of the Secular, The Politics of Cultural Practice, Rajasthan: An Oral History, Another Asia: Rabindranath Tagore and Okakura Tenshin and Terror and Performance.  In recent years, he has worked as a dramaturge for the Tangencya public art project in Durban, South Africa, as Project Director for Arna-Jharna: The Desert Museum of Rajasthan, and as Artistic Director of the Inter-Asia Ramayana Festival at the theater laboratory Adishakti in Pondicherry.  In February 2015, he will be curating an international conference at the Jawaharlal Nehru University on Rethinking Labor and the Creative Economy: Global Performative Perspectives.

Shane Blackman, Professor of Cultural Studies Department of Media, Art and Design Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent, UK
Title of presentation: Doing Ethnography with Young People: from description to theory

"Doing Ethnography with Young People: from description to theory" focusing on what is distinctive about ethnography, its assumptions, approach, tradition and positionality, issues within fieldwork such as access, interactions, relationships/emotions, how to do interpretation and generate theory.

Shane Blackman is a Professor of Cultural Studies at Canterbury Christ Chruch University, UK. He received his Ph.D. at the Institute of Education, University of London as an ESRC scholarship student. His most recent book is Chilling Out: The Cultural Politics of Substance Consumption, Youth and Drug Policy (2004, McGrawHill-Open University Press). He is a member of the Journal of Youth Studies and YOUNG: Nordic Journal of Youth Research and a member of ESRC Peer Review College. Dr Blackman's research interests include ethnography, deviance, schooling, youth culture, popular music, drugs, feminism, and social and cultural theory.

Matt Cook, Senior lecturer in History and Gender Studies, Birkbeck College, University of London. Department of History, Classics, and Archeology.
Title of presentation: Queer Domesticities: taking queer history indoors

In this lecture Matt Cook uses his latest book (Queer Domesticities: homosexuality and home life in twentieth century London) to make a case for the importance of interior space in the understanding and analysis of queer - and here queer male – desires and relationships.
In discussion of artists Charles Shannon and Charles Ricketts, playwright Joe Orton, film-maker Derek Jarman, a group of gay squatters and more besides, he shows how queer home lives provide rich material for the understanding of conflicts, overlaps and intersections of different identifications relating especially to gender, class, nationality and ethnicity.

Dr Matt Cook is Senior Lecturer in History and Gender Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, a Co-director of the Raphael Samuel History Centre, and an editor of History Workshop Journal. He is the author of London and the Culture of Homosexuality, 1885 – 1914 (2003), lead author and editor of A Gay History of Britain (2007), Queer Domesticities (2014), and co-editor of Queer 1950s (2012; with Heike Bauer) and Queer Cities, Queer Cultures (2014; with Jennifer Evans).

Eric Fassin, Professor at the department of Political Science and Centre of Women’s and Gender Studies. Université Paris-8 Vincennes-Saint Denis France
Title of presentation: Same-Sex Marriage, Nation, and Race: French political logics and rhetorics

While the debate on “marriage for all” may have looked like a mere repetition of the earlier one on PaCS, the terms have changed since the late 1990s – from secular to religious, and from anthropological to biological. But it is still about national identity. In France, filiation is sacralized because it defines both family and citizenship. As the comparison with the United States makes it clear, the opposition to gay marriage is thus also about race: it articulates the racialization of the nation and the biologisation of the family. However, the political rhetorics do not always coincide with this logic of naturalization / denaturalization: while the sexual nationalisms of the early 2000s pitted “sexual democracy” against racialized minorities, the polemics of the next decade, from the Taubira law to the (so-called) “theory of gender,” offer new configurations of the intersections of sexual and racial politics. Is the Catholic, bourgeois movement of La Manif pour tous about whiteness, or is a morally conservative alliance with the children of immigrants and Muslims from the outer-cities possible?

Éric Fassin is a professor of sociology in the Political Science Department and the Gender Studies Center at Paris 8 University. He works on contemporary sexual and racial politics in France and the United States, and their intersections (e.g. immigration in Europe). He is frequently involved in French public debates on issues his work addresses. He is the author of books such as L’inversion de la question homosexuelle (2005), Le sexe politique (2009), and Démocratie précaire. Chroniques de la déraison d’État (2012), co-author of four volumes on French immigration policies (Cette France-là, 2008-2012), co-editor of De la question sociale à la question raciale? (2006). Published in 2014: Roms & Riverains. Une politique municipale de la race (La Fabrique), Gauche : l’avenir d’une désillusion (Textuel), and the new edition of Foucault’s Herculine Barbin (Gallimard).

Hanna Guttorm, Post-doc-tutkija, Helsingin yliopisto
Title of presentation: Väitöstutkimusta runomitassa - jälkistrukturalistiset teoriat tutkimuskirjoittamisen käytännöissä

Hanna Guttormin 25.4.2014 Helsingin yliopistossa tarkastettu väitös poikkeaa totutusta monin tavoin. Jo tutkimuksen nimi, Sommitelmia ja kiepsahduksia: Nomadisia kirjoituksia tutkimuksen tulemisesta (ja käsityön sukupuolisopimuksesta), kertoo, että nyt ei olla ihan tavallisen tutkimuksen äärellä. Guttorm kuvaa tutkimuksensa tulemista ja jälkistrukturalististen teorioiden materialisoitumista tutkimuksen ja sen kirjoittamisen käytännöissä. Miten asettua tutkijan paikalle vallitsevissa tieteen tekemisen käytännöissä? Miten maailmasta voi kirjoittaa kielellä, joka aina kategorisoi ja erottelee? Ja miten kuvata tutkimuksen prosessia, kun jälkistrukturalistiset teoriat pannaan käytäntöön myös tutkimuksen tekemisen ja kirjoittamisen käytännöissä eikä vain aineistojen analyyseissa?

Guttorm pohtii tutkimuksessaan tiedon tuottamisen ja tietämään tulemisen käytäntöjä ja kuvaa, miten ja mitä väitöskirjassa tapahtuu. Hän esittää metodin ja empirian kuvauksia sekä runomuotoista kysymysten virtaa limittäin myöhemmin kirjoitettujen teoreettisten tekstien kanssa. Näitä kaikkia kirjoituksia hän nimittää nomadisiksi. Guttorm osoittaa, että runomuotoinen kirjoittaminen sopii kuvaamaan tapahtumisten, ilmiöiden ja todellisuuksien rakentumisen jatkuvaa liikettä, niitä haltuunottamatta. Aukollisuudessaan runomuotoinen kieli havainnollistaa tietämisen osittaisuuden, alituisen keskeneräisyyden, monitulkintaisuuden ja prosessiluonteisuuden. Lisäksi se antaa tilaa hengittää ja olla tuhansia eri mieliä.
Guttormin tutkimus luo suomalaiseen käyttäytymis-tieteelliseen tutkimukseen tilaa omalta liikkeelliseltä paikalta tapahtuvalle jälkistrukturalistiselle autoetnografiselle kirjoittamiselle. Kirjoittamiselle, jossa tutkijan oma ja ei-oma tunteva ja ajatteleva moniääni kuuluu.

Beverley Skeggs, Professor in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.
Title of presentation: Reacting to Representation

Drawing on recent research from an ESRC research project on reality television, published as ‘Reacting to Reality TV: Audience, Performance, Value’, which included both textual and audience research over three years, this paper will examine how different groups of
women respond to the television. The responses were shaped not just through reading representations, as is often assumed in media theory, but instead through immanent affect. The majority of research on television proposes that the moral project of neoliberalism has been achieved as programmes instruct people on how to become responsible subjects. Our research suggests this moral appeal is limited, addressing only those who can benefit from its call. More radical analysis suggests that affect disrupts TV’s moral incitement, generating radical new possibilities. Our audience research also highlighted the limits to this approach.  As a form of sensational melodrama reality TV manipulates affects of disgust, repulsion and
care. Yet rather than offering either regulation or resistance we show how programmes generate struggles for value, challenging traditional understandings of media, representation and ideology.

Beverley Skeggs works in the department of Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her main publications include The Media (1992), Feminist Cultural Theory (1995), Formations of Class and Gender (1997), Transformations: Thinking Through Feminism (2000); Class,
Self, Culture (2004), Sexuality and the Politics of Violence and Safety (2004) (with Les Moran, Paul Tyrer and Karen Corteen), Feminism After Bourdieu (2004 with Lisa Adkins), Reality TV and Class (2011) and Reacting to Reality Television: Audience, Performance, Value
(2012) (both with Helen Wood).  She is the co-editor of The Sociological Review and is currently an ESRC Professorial Fellow on a project on ‘A Sociology of Values and Value’.

Emanuela Lombardo, Associate Professor at the Department of Political Science and Administration II of Madrid Complutense University, Spain.
Title of presentation: The symbolic representation of gender

What is symbolic representation? Why should (feminist) political science engage more with it? Since Hanna Pitkin's seminal book on The Concept of Representation, the symbolic has been the least studied dimension of political representation. In research developed with Petra Meier (Ashgate 2014), we argue that the concept of symbolic representation deserves more scholarly attention than the one it has received so far, so to advance our understanding of what symbolic representation is and what it contributes to political representation. Starting from an understanding of the symbol as being constructed, we explore the relationship between agent (that doing the representing) and principal (that being represented) in symbolic representation, taking gender as the principal and political discourse as the agent. This allows us to address questions such as: What are women and men symbols of? How is gender constructed in policy discourse? What functions does symbolic representation fulfil in the construction of gender? And what is the relationship between symbolic, descriptive, and substantive representation? Drawing on theories of symbolic representation and gender, as well as primary data about political debates on labour and care issues, partnership and reproductive rights, gender violence, and quotas, our analysis shows that reconsidering symbolic representation from a discursive perspective makes explicit issues of (in)equality embedded within particular constructions, as well as their consequences for political representation and gender equality.

Emanuela Lombardo is Associate Professor at the Department of Political Science and Administration II of Madrid Complutense University (Spain). Her research concerns gender equality policies, especially in the European Union and Spain, Europeanization, and gender and political representation. On these issues she has published articles in peer reviewed journals as well as chapters in edited volumes. Her last edited book, with Maxime Forest, is The Europeanization of Gender Equality Policies (Palgrave 2012) and her last monograph, authored with Petra Meier, is The Symbolic Representation of Gender (Ashgate 2014). For further information see http://www.ucm.es/info/target/

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SPRING TERM 2014

Athena Athanasiou (Panteion University): Associate Professor, Department of Social Anthropology, Panteion University, Athens, Greece.
Title of presentation: Unthinkable Mourning: Counter-Memory and Feminist Political Subjectivity in Post-Yugoslavia 

This work glimpses within the affective lives and powers of political activism. My core theoretical question is about agonistic grievability as enacted by activists who enact the register of mourning despite and against its normative assumptions of heteronormative bloodline kinship and militarist national sovereignty. Why does grievability matter politically, then? How might it attend to the experience of becoming a political subject engaged in feminist and antimilitarist struggles? I pursue such questions through the perspective of the Women in Black movement in Belgrade and the ways in which it deploys public grief as a performative practice of protest against nationalism and the wars which led to the break-up of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

Athena Athanasiou is Associate Professor of Social Anthropology at Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, in Athens, Greece.  She has authored the books: Life at the Limit: Essays on Gender, Body and Biopolitics (Athens, 2007); and Crisis as a State of Exception: Critiques and Resistances (Athens, 2012). She has edited the volumes: Feminist Theory and Cultural Critique (Athens, 2006); Rewriting Difference: Luce Irigaray and 'the Greeks' (co-ed. with Elena Tzelepis, SUNY Press, 2010); and Biosocialities: Perspectives on Medical Anthropology (Athens, 2011). She has co-authored, with Judith Butler, Dispossession: The Performative in the Political (Polity Press, 2013).

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Elina Penttinen, Sukupuolentutkimuksen yliopistonlehtori, Helsingin yliopisto (University Lecturer, Gender Studies, University of Helsinki)
Title of presentation: "Maailma palaa. Poliisinaiset kriisinhallintatyössä"

Kansainvälistä sotilaallista ja siviilikriisinhallintaa toteutetaan jatkuvasti muuttuvassa ja monimutkaisessa turvallisuusympäristössä. Turvallisuustoimijoilta vaaditaan kykyä toimia muuttuvissa olosuhteissa, eettisesti ja tavoitteellisesti ihmisoikeuksia edistäen. Suomi pyrkii toteuttamaan tätä tavoitetta erityisesti lisäämällä naisia siviilikriisinhallintatehtäviin. Tutkimuksessani kartoitin mitä naispoliisit itse ajattelevat heihin liitetyistä odotuksista ja miten he kokevat sukupuolen merkityksen kriisinhallintatyössä. Mitä lisäarvoa naisen sukupuoli antaa kriisinhallintatehtävissä? Ja mikä onkaan naispoliisien menestyksen salaisuus?

Elina Penttinen on sukupuolentutkimuksen yliopistonlehtori Helsingin yliopistolla. Hän on tutkimuksessaan käsitellyt sodan kokemusta ja kriisinhallintaa painottaen erityisesti eettistä kompetenssia, sodan traumaa ja siitä toipumista sekä positiivisten tunteiden merkitystä. Hänen viimeisin teoksensa Joy and International Relations: a new methodology (2013) Routledge: UK, kokoaa nämä teemat yhteen ja rakentaa uutta metodologiaa, joka kutsuu tutkijaa ongelmien lisäksi tutkimaan myös onnistumista, iloa, empatiaa ja ystävällisyyttä haastavissa olosuhteissa. Penttisen aikaisempi tutkimus sijoittuu feministiseen maailmanpolitiikkaan ja hän on käsitellyt erityisesti globaalia seksiteollisuutta.

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Susanne Lettow, Professor of Gender and Natural Sciences, University of Basel, Switzerland and Lecturer in Philosophy at University of Paderborn, Germany
Title of presentation:  "Vitalism, Ontology, Posthumanism. Three Problems of Contemporary Feminist Theory"

During the last years, constructivism that has informed feminist theorizing since the early 1990s has been increasingly scrutinized. Many theorists claim that the constructivist understanding according to which gender, the body and the world we live in are discursively constructed dismisses the materiality of our existence and its entanglement with non-human beings. In my talk I argue that it is indeed an urgent task for feminist theory to rethink theoretical approaches to matter, body, and biology, and to develop a new theoretical language beyond naturalism and anti-naturalism. However, I am critical about some current theoretical developments by which these challenges are met, in particular the recent turns to vitalism, to ontology and to posthumanism. By discussing these problems I will figure out a elements of a praxeological approach to socionatural relations that avoids a flight from contingency and social and political realities.

Susanne Lettow is currently Visiting Professor for Gender Studies at the University of Basel, Switzerland. She has holds a PhD in philosophy from the Free University Berlin and has held research and teaching positions in Austria and Germany at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna, the Free University of Berlin and the University of Vienna. She is also a board member of the International Association of Women Philosophers. Among her publications are: The Power of Care. The Philosophical Articulation of Gender Relations in Heidegger's Being and Time (in German, Tübingen: edition discord 2001); Biophilosophies. Science, Technology and Gender in Contemporary Philosophical Discourse (in German, Frankfurt/Main and New York: Campus 2011), and the edited volume Reproduction, race and gender in philosophy and the early life sciences, Albany: SUNY Press 2014)

Taina Kinnunen, Professor of Gender Studies. University of Tampere
Title of presentation: "Touch as Gendered Politics of Affects"

Touch is the most archaic mode of human communication and bonding which the paper discusses by utilizing physiological and psychoanalytic theories. Simultaneously, touch is culturally regulated, experienced and performed - and silenced. I ask how the carnality of touch could be reconsidered by combining anthropological studies of senses and feminist theories of affects. In the context of the traditional Finnish touching culture, the paper stresses the transmission and intercorporeality of affects and the politics of gendering the affects related to touch.

Taina Kinnunen is a cultural antropologist and she currently works as a Professor of Gender Studies at the University of Tampere. She has examined the relationship between the body, gender and culture in mediated, aestheticized and technologized social spheres. Kinnunen has published monographs, collaboration books and articles on beauty culture, cosmetic surgery and extreme bodybuilding. She was the responsible leader of the research group examining installing of ubiquitous technology in northern Finland. Her current interests include the aesthetized body in the post-industrial working culture. Recently, she published a book of the Finnish touching culture.

Feminist Research in the Social Sciences and Humanities (5ECTS) Helsinki University Summer School Course: 7.8.-23.8.2018 
Organiser: Centre for Nordic Studies, University of Helsinki
Coordinators:  Merle Wessel & Cai Weaver

Synopsis  
This practical course educates students in how to do and carry out feminist research. We will focus on how feminist scholards challenge dominant theories of knowledge and the major methodologies employed in the social sciences and humanities.
Through lectures and workshops, we will ask how feminist theory shapes the kinds of research questions we ask, the types of materials we use, the methodologies we choose, and how we define our relationships with our subject/materials. Students are expected to conduct a short pre-assignment, actively participate in the workshop discussion, and critically reflect throughtout the course.

Learning objectives
After the course, the student will be able to
- Plan and carry out a larger research project utilising feminist research methodologies
- Reflect upon the limits of conventional knowledge production in academia
- Gain practical and creative skills to produce diverse forms of knowledge
- Discuss politics of gender, race, class and sexuality in cross-cultural contexts
- Recognise the diverse historical, cultural and political trajectories and forms of feminist politics
- Critically engage with intersectional research methods and theories

Course format and teaching methods
Lectures, workshops and excursions. The interdiciplinary teaching methods combine traditional learning methods and feminist research methodologies, such as art, college marking, and poetry. The students require no practical experience of art making or doing feminist research. 

Teachers

Merle Weßel (PhD), is an assistant professor in Nordic history at the University of Greifswald/ Germany. Her doctoral dissertation "Un Unholy Union? Eugenic Feminism in the Nordic Countries, ca. 1890-1940" (2018) discusses the engagement of Nordic feminists into eugenic debates and the use of eugenic rhetoric in the fight for female empowerment.
She has co-edited the anthology "Conceptualising Public Health. Historical and Contemporary Struggles over Key Concepts", published by Routledge (2018) and published articles about castration, race and feminist topics in for example Scandinavian Journal of History. Her main research interests are gender and cultural history as well as medical humanities.

Cai Weaver M.Soc.Sci is a Doctoral Candidate at the Department of Political and Economic Studies, University of Helsinki. His PhD research focuses on issues of Biopoliticial Governance, (Homo)Sexuality, and Russia. Weaver's other research interests are Feminist Research Methods, Nationalism, and Gender and Politics in Video Games. For the academic years 2018-19 and 2017-18, he is responsible for teaching the Master's Seminar Course "Gender and Politics in Europe" and the Bachelor's Lecture Course "Gender, Politics and Society". He has also taught on the Master's course "Exploring Politics of Gender and Sexuality across the Finnish-Russian Border" at the University of Tampere in Autumn 2016. He has published in Idäntutkimus The Finnish Review of East European Studies and has a forthcoming article in Sexualities He has organised and chaired panels at various international conferences. 
https://tuhat.helsinki.fi/portal/en/person/cweaver   

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10th INTERNATIONAL NORDWEL SUMMER SCHOOL
STATE, SOCIETY & CITIZEN - CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES ON WELFARE STATE DEVELOPMENT
 
University of Helsinki, 13-17 August 2018 

Welfare states can be studied with a number of theoretical and methodological approaches, from various chronological perspectives and with a focus on different empirical phenomena. The summer school aims to stimulate discussions across disciplines and foster innovative cross-disciplinary research on the development of welfare states over time. The summer school brings together PhD students and well-established international scholars in scientific exchange.

We invite PhD students from different disciplinary backgrounds to participate in the discussion on the development of welfare states, their preconditions, present status and how we ought to study them. PhD Students present their papers in parallel sessions and get feedback from senior scholars and junior colleagues.

The list of teachers include Romana Careja (University of Southern Denmark), Patrick Emmenegger (University of St. Gallen), Olli Kangas (The Social Insurance Institution of Finland – Kela), Herbert Obinger (University of Bremen), Noel Whiteside (University of Warwick), Helena Blomberg-Kroll (University of Helsinki), Pauli Kettunen (University of Helsinki), Åsa Lundqvist (Lund University), Pirjo Markkola (University of Tampere), Paul Marx (University of Duisburg-Essen) and Klaus Petersen (University of Southern Denmark).

We welcome applications by PhD students, including a paper proposal and a short description of the phase of their studies, by 31 March 2018. The approved proposals will be selected on the basis of their quality. Papers can be written from a broad historical or contemporary perspective and come from different disciplines such as history, social policy, sociology, political science, and political philosophy. Guidelines for papers will be sent in connection with the letters of approval by 30 April 2018. Participants who complete the summer school successfully are credited with 5 ECTS.

Prepare for postdoc -afternoon 23th March 2018

SKY -doctoral programme is organising a PREPARE FOR POSTDOC afternoon event, intended for those SKY students who are approaching the end their PhD studies, and are wondering what next. We will explore, and inform about, the various possibilities for fresh PhD’s inside and outside of academia, and discuss the current ideas of an ideal postdoc period. Some ex-SKY PhD students, who are well in their postdoc period will tell about their experiences.  

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WorldGender -course and Marta Segarra’s public talk: “‘Show Me the Place’: New Forms of Kinship in a Posthuman World”  28–30 Nov 2017
This PhD course concentrates on the ongoing work of participating PhD students, which will be commented on by the three teachers and by the co-students of the course with the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high quality. The expertise of the three teachers is in a wide area of feminist thought, as well as in studying gender and sexuality in different cultural contexts. The focus of the course is on the worldwide transfer of feminist ideas, concepts, and ideals, which travel from one cultural context to another other, and in particular in the conflicts of ideals and practices in those transfers, such as those in between western to non-western contexts of change in gender and sexuality. The teachers are prepared to comment work which tackles with conflicts zones and paradoxes of the crossing ideals concerning feminist change and practices of gender and sexuality, whether approached in terms of theoretical discussions, study of literature or art, or in terms of empirical social research. Teachers cover a large area of methodological approaches and the literature on the course comprises scholarship ranging from the transatlantic transfer of feminist ideas to the core postcolonial feminist literature.

The Teachers:

Marta Segarra is a Research Professor at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), and a member of the Laboratoire d’études de genre et de sexualité‒Research Center on Gender and Sexuality Studies (LEGS). She is also a Professor of Gender Studies and French Studies at the University of Barcelona (Spain), where she co-founded and directed (1994-2013) the Center for Women and Literature (now Theory, Gender, Sexuality). She also directed the Unesco Chair on Women, Development and Cultures (2004-2015). She has published in the fields of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Francophone Maghrebi Studies, contemporary French literature and cinema, biopolitics and posthumanism, for journals such as New Literary History, Mosaic, Contemporary French and Francophone Studies/Sites, or Paragraph. Her books include: Teoría de los cuerpos agujereados (Porous Bodies: A Theory, 2014), Differences in Common: Gender, Vulnerabilty and Community (co-ed. with J. Sabadell-Nieto, 2014), Demenageries. Thinking (of) Animals after Derrida (co-ed. with A. E. Berger, 2011), The Portable Cixous (ed., 2010), and Traces du désir (Traces of Desire, 2008).

Tuija Pulkkinen is professor of Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her work moves in a large area of philosophy, history and politics, and she has published on political thought, democratic theory, conceptual change, and the study of gender and sexuality. Her publications include The Postmodern and Political Agency (2000), and the co-edited volume The Ashgate Research Companion to The Politics of Democratization in Europe. Concepts and Histories (2008). She has edited (with Kimberly Hutchings) Hegel’s Philosophy and Feminist Thought. Beyond Antigone?  (2010), and (with Antu Sorainen)  Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen – poliittisen käsitteen historia [From Sittlichkeit to Sexuality – the History of a Political Concept]  (2011). She is currently working on a project on the politics of philosophy in contemporary feminist theory.

Patricia Scalco is a social anthropologist and a postdoctoral researcher currently based at the University of Helsinki. She earned her PhD from the University of Manchester and her doctoral research, currently being transformed into a monograph, explored the intersections of gender and sexual moralities in the delineation of private and public spaces in contemporary Istanbul.  Patricia lived and conducted extensive fieldwork in Istanbul since 2006, earning her MA in Social Anthropology from Yeditepe University. She is an Early Career Researcher member of the Editorial Board of the Sociological Review and as a fellow of the Academy of Finland, her postdoctoral project gives continuity to the study of space, place and gender in the area of the Grand Bazaar, in Istanbul.

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"Transforming Working Life, Gender and Care" 4.-5.12.2017

This SKY course for doctoral students aims to:

  • Introduce students to the central issues in designing and carrying out gender research at postgraduate level and beyond.
  • Consider recent debates on gender and feminist research on the concepts of working life and care.
  • Examine what difference it makes to take gender and intersecting differences as the subject or object of research.

Of particular concern are the ethical and political issues arising from doing gender research with respect to representing others and seeking to influence and engage with broader social contexts. The course is interdisciplinary, and you will be introduced to a range of perspectives on knowledge production and research practice.

As a result of participating in this course you should be equipped to:

  • Critically assess existing knowledge practices.
  • Identify challenges to 'mainstream knowledge' that come from gendered and feminist perspectives.
  • Explore how knowledge is produced and offer critical assessments of the dominant debates in gendered research practice, asking how we ensure that we conduct research ethically.

Through a discussion on methodological questions, the course provides an opportunity to reflect on and synthesize a range of research design issues. These are addressed on the course through producing and collectively evaluating student designed research proposals and papers.

The course is highly participatory and you are encouraged to bring key questions, issues and texts from your own research and reading that we can consider as a group. For each participant, one hour of time will be reserved for presentation of one’s paper, discussion and comments.

Teachers:
Linda McKie
is Professor of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Edinburgh where she is Dean and Head of the School for Social and Political Sciences. She joined Edinburgh after completing five years at the University of Durham where she was Head of the School of Applied Social Sciences, Durham University, UK. She is also an Associate Director of the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, University of Edinburgh. Linda has published over 120 peer reviewed articles, books and chapters and been a member of the editorial boards for a range of journals including Sociology, Sociology of Health and Illness, and Work, Employment and Society. Linda is passionate in her support for early career colleagues and runs regular writing courses and retreats on planning and writing publications and research proposals. In 2004 she was elected to the UK Academy of Social sciences and was a member of the Sociology Unit of Assessment Panel for the UK Research Assessment Framework in 2014.

Marjut Jyrkinen is Associate Professor in Work-life Equality and Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki (UH). She has her PhD in Management and Organisation studies, Hanken School of Economics, and Docentship in Faculty of Social Sciences, UH. Her current research interests are in the areas of sustainability and intersectionalities in working life, and research on gender, management and organisations. She has over 65 scientific publications including 40 peer reviewed articles. Marjut is Co-director of the SKY Doctoral Programme and Research Director of WeAll Research Consortium (weallfinland.fi).

Jukka Lehtonen is a Senior Researcher in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki, Finland. He currently works on workplace diversity and equality issues in WeAll –project (weallfinland.fi) funded by the Academy of Finland. His research focus is on media discourses on intersecting differences and normativities in the working life as well as on non-heterosexual and trans youth with in education and work environment. Sexual and gender diversity within school, workplace, youth culture and research have been his research topics for over 25 years. He has over 100 scientific publications including five monographs and 10 edited compilation works.

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Feminist reading group in social and political theory

The purpose of this course is to get acquainted with key texts in feminist social, political and legal theory broadly conceived and to help students apply relevant theories to their own doctoral research. The course is also open as a reading group/seminar even if one does not need to obtain ECTS credits. The content of the course will be designed to connect with the research and theoretical interests of the participants.

The course has the form of a reading group with seminar sessions where theory and research by the participants is connected. The readings may comprise keys issues in feminist theory connected to, for example, subjectivity in society, politics and law; class, ethnicity and intersectional concerns; sexuality and reproduction and materialism and affect, or any other key issues in classical or contemporary feminist thinking that participants wish to address in a systematic and structured manner.
 
The group convenes approximately once a month, there being 5-6 sessions per term. For each session, participants will read designated texts and research paper/s by other participants, or a selection of designated texts. In order to obtain 4 credits, one must participate in the majority of sessions during one term (absence may be amended with extra writing tasks), read about 500 pages of literature and papers by fellow participants and write a literature review of 10-15 pages. 1 extra credit (5 credits in total) may be obtained by writing an additional essay based on the literature review.
Teacher/Contact person
Linda Hart, D.Soc.Sc, linda.hart(at)helsinki.fi

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Writing history from the perspectives of gender and the body Nov21st -23rd, 2017

The workshop examines feminist and queer approaches to the historiography, especially that of the arts and music. The aim of the workshop is to help individual students  form their research questions and arguments, using methods and theoretical models drawn from recent "intersectional" scholarship on the interaction of gendered and raced alterities, as well as from history, historical studies of the arts, musicology, ethnomusicology, anthropology and sound studies. Special emphasis will be on the interpretation of historical data as articulations of or evidence about gendered and raced distributions of power in the past.

Teachers:
Suzanne G. Cusick, Professor of Music on the Faculty of Arts and Science at New York University has published extensively on gender and sexuality in relation to the musical cultures of early modern Italy and of contemporary North America, including in the collections Musicology and Difference, Queering the Pitch, and Audible Traces. Her feminist readings of early modern music and musical culture have appeared in JAMS, Early Music, The Cambridge Companion to Monteverdi, and the Brazilian journal Per Musi. Revista Academica de Musica. Cusick's book, Francesca Caccini at the Medici Court: Music and the Circulation of Power (Chicago, 2009), received the 2010 book prize of the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women. In 2003-2012  she was the main editor of Women and Music. A Journal of Gender of Culture, the first journal  focused on the relationship of gender and sexuality to musical culture. She currently studies the use of noise, music and "gender coercion" in the detention and interrogation of prisoners held during the 21st-century's "war on terror," work for which she received the Philip Brett Award given by the LGBTQ Study Group of the American Musicological Society in 2007.

Pirkko Moisala works as the professor of musicology and ethnomusicology at the University of Helsinki. Her recently concluded project aimed at renewing methods and approaches of music research with the help of the radical process philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and her collaborator Felix  Guattari (see http://www.helsinki.fi/deleuzian/  and Musical Encounters with Deleuze and Guattari). Moisala’s areas of expertise are music anthropology (ethnomusicology) as well as gender and cultural studies of music. Her publications within gender studies include Kaija Saariaho, Music and Gender, Gender and Qualitative Methods, and Musiikin toinen sukupuoli (The Other Sex of Music).

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Thinking Queer Temporality  Sept 25th 10-16 and Dr. Gunkel's Christina lecture 26th 16-18

PhD workshop on queer-feminist strategies for alternative engagements: PhD students are welcome to a one-day workshop on how to analyze unconventional thinking, writing or images – how to engage with utopian, alternative, disruptive or in different ways creative materials/data so that our scholarly and critical practices open rather than close possible opportunities for imaginative interventions? Does academic scholarship allow for engagements beyond the understanding, dissecting, oppositional or otherwise taming practices, and how?

This is a non-competative, low-threshold-participation workshop: one can come with any topic, material and paper, as long as one is interested in alternative forms of articulating resistance. Participants are encouraged to provide 3-10 page papers or discussion pieces and a short summary of their projects, and an excerpt from their data for all of us to discuss. Each participant's work and questions gets equal amount of time to be spent on the topic, but the pedagogy of the workshop is to freely discuss rather than mere listen to presentations. Participants who do not wish to provide a paper can attend by discussing only, but everyone should read all the provided materials.

Teachers:
Henriette Gunkel, Department of Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London.
Elina Oinas, Soc&kom, sociology, University of Helsinki

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Writing feminist research: practices to enhance style, argumentation and self-reflectivity -workshop. Teachers Erszebet Strausz, University of Warwick and Elina Penttinen, University of Helsinki

Includes public talk "Creativity as strategy and subversion in the neoliberal university: experiments in critical pedagogy, narrative research, and public engagement" by  Erszebet Strausz

Writing a doctoral thesis in the contemporary context of neoliberalist university politics, uncertainty and efficiency may add pressure to research and the writing process. In this workshop our goal is to address the challenges and tensions in writing feminist research and find practices to enhance one’s own argumentation, confidence in research and articulation.

A key element in feminist research ethics is self-reflectivity and recognition of power relations within academic practices. Actualizing these demands, however, may be difficult to do in practice. What does it mean to be self-reflective? How much are we supposed to write ourselves into the text: what makes personal reflection effective without being ‘too much’? What are the political implications of engaging with our situatedness in the field we study for the power relations that we engage with and seek to challenge? We will collectively explore ways to build one’s own argument and attain the goals of scientific research without getting lost in the process and with a view of nurturing new forms of writing, creativity and narrative that may unfold from these practices.

This workshop draws on critical pedagogy to enhance awareness of the ‘politics’ of research and introduces creative analytic writing as a method to bring clarity to individual research trajectories and offer alternatives to the implicit masculinism and power implications of scientific writing. The session showcases exercises from the creative analytic writing field and demonstrates how these may help to gain new insights into some of the core questions of one’s own research. The aim is not to dismiss the logico-scientific approach but rather to assist everyone in finding and refining their own writing style and academic expression. 

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Feminist Readings symposium Friday, 26th of May at  2017

Research – Creativity –  Activism

Welcome to the third edition of the international Feminist Readings symposium. This time we convene in Helsinki! 

This symposium is intent on starting discussions about the potential of bringing together research, creativity and activism. Our selection of presentations comes from young researchers. The focus is on writing, which we understand broadly as giving form to ideas and creating connections. Writing is a process, often necessary for the realisation of an idea, a manifestation of the act of thinking.

During the two-day symposium we ask could creative writing and other creative methods allow more  diverse ways to do research and approach feminism? What do creativity and innovation mean in relation to research if doing research is always already creative, yet often represented as separate from artistic activity? Is it possible to write and do research differently or against the grain, challenging conventions of the academic, artistic, and activist mainstream? How could different situated knowledges question the white malestream?

In addition to our wonderful program of papers, we have two keynote lectures by the following people:

Akila Kizzi (University of Paris 8)
Heta Rundgren (University of Helsinki & University of Paris 8)

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SKY Journal afternoon 11.4.2017

This event aims to answer the questions doctoral candidates may have about publishing in journals. The programme includes short presentations held by both senior and junior researchers. This is a good opportunity to share experiences and tips, and learn more about journals in which to publish your research on gender!

We wish participation of researchers at different stages of their careers, and participants are invited to give very short presentations on the following questions: 

1)    In which journals do I publish my research on gender and sexuality ?  In which journals would I like to publish?  Which journals do I read?  Why? 

2)     A memorable story on my experiences in journal publishing.

3)     My best tip for journal publishing 

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Feminist reading group in social and political theory
 
The purpose of this course is to get acquainted with key texts in feminist social, political and legal theory broadly conceived and to help students apply relevant theories to their own doctoral research. The course is also open as a reading group/seminar even if one does not need to obtain ECTS credits. The content of the course will be designed to connect with the research and theoretical interests of the participants.
 
The course has the form of a reading group with seminar sessions where theory and research by the participants is connected. The readings may comprise keys issues in feminist theory connected to, for example, subjectivity in society, politics and law; class, ethnicity and intersectional concerns; sexuality and reproduction and materialism and affect, or any other key issues in classical or contemporary feminist thinking that participants wish to address in a systematic and structured manner.
 
Teacher/Contact person
Linda Hart, D.Soc.Sc, linda.hart(at)helsinki.fi

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SKY doctoral course:  Gender, Sexuality, Feminism, and Queer in post-Soviet Russia and in Eastern Europe 9th December 2016

This PhD course is a one-day workshop concentrating on the ongoing PhD work on gender, sexuality, feminism, and queer in Russia. It is the first one is the series of PhD workshops between the Gender Studies programme at the European University in St Petersburg and SKY. In this first workshop the invited Russian expects, professors Anna Temkina and Elena Zdravomyslova, together with hosting teachers, Tuija Pulkkinen and Katja Kahlina, and the participating PhD candidates comment and discuss the ongoing PhD projects. The idea of the course is to provide the insight of experienced teachers with the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high international quality.

The expertise of the teachers is in a wide area of feminist scholarship and gender studies, ranging from feminist and queer theory and contemporary society and politics to methods of social research and conceptual analysis. The teachers are prepared to comment on empirical work as well as theoretical work. Participants are welcome to bring in PhD projects that build on new original research or that comment on the existing work of various scholars within the interdisciplinary area of feminist and gender studies in its intersections with queer theory and politics.

The suggested literature on the course comprises scholarship ranging from historical studies to contemporary Russia, on sociology and political studies, as well as methodology and politics of concepts. The course focuses in particular on the methodological challenges encountered by those who study gender and sexuality, feminism and queer relations and politics in contemporary Russia, in their doctoral projects.

The course is arranged by University of Helsinki Doctoral Programme Gender Culture and Society (SKY). It is open for applications from PhD students of all universities.

The Teachers:
Anna Temkina is Professor of the Sociology of Public Health and Gender, and co-coordinator of the Gender Studies Program at the European University in St Petersburg, Russia. With a Ph.D. in Sociology (University of Helsinki), she studies contemporary changes in attitudes and practices concerning gender and sexuality in Russian post-Soviet society. Temkina is an expert of feminist theory, social theory from gender perspective, sociology of health and medicine, and on qualitative methods in sociological research.

Elena Zdravomyslova is Professor at the Department of Political Science and Sociology and co-cordinator of the Gender Studies Program at the European University in St Petersburg, Russia. She is an expert on modes of gender in post-Soviet society, women’s social activism, care and emotional work from a feminist perspective, and on reproductive health (institutions and practices).

Tuija Pulkkinen is professor of Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. She works in the area of philosophy, history, and politics, and on feminist and queer scholarship. She has published on political thought and democratic theory; on nationalism; on conceptual change, and on history of feminism and gender and queer studies.

Katja Kahlina is Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her work focuses on the ways in which gender and sexual politics intersect with nationalism and (neoliberal) globalisation, as well as with social institutions and categories of citizenship, nationality, ethnicity, and, most recently, religion. Her current research deals with anti-LGBT movements in Croatia and Serbia. 

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Day of Daring - Lecture and workshop September 22th 2016

What’s the story behind the world famous “Congrats, you have an all male panel!” website? How can the internet be used for innovative research methodologies and dissemination of research results? How to use visual artistic methods in supporting the research process and/or publishing the results in a different way? How to build up courage and act in solidarity with other scholars? The Day of Daring offers answers to these questions and more. The workshop will offer a creative angle to your own research project and give you new confidence to present your work for academic and wider audiences.

Dr. Saara Särmä is the co-founder and president of Feminist think thank Hattu and the creator of “Congrats, you have an all male panel!” website.  Her doctoral dissertation in International Relations (2014) titled Junk Feminism and Nuclear Wannabes – Collaging Parodies of Iran and North Korea focused on internet parody images and developed a unique and innovative art-based collage methodology for studying world politics.  She’s interested in politics of visuality, feminist academic activism, and laughter in world politics. Together with her co-conspirators in Hattu, she aims to smash the patriarchy through the means of radical fun. Hattu has developed successful and empowering concepts such as the School of Daring and Swearing Soirees. 

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 How to study categorizations, classifications and gendered governance 

Cross-disciplinary doctoral course at 11-12th October 2016, Organized by doctoral programmes SKY (Gender, Culture and Society) and PSRC (Political, Societal and Regional Changes) and the research project NaDeWe (Nationalism and Democracy in the Welfare State). 

Knowledge and power associated with categorizations and classifications is an important aspect in many studies in different disciplines and with cross-disciplinary ambitions.  In research on public policies, education, health, care, working life, consumption, social movements and ethnic relations, for example, questions emerge concerning the ways individuals, populations and societies are defined and structured as targets of knowledge, policies, control, or empowerment. Gendered governance is a crucial perspective to the practices of categorization and classification, and it appears important to examine national developments in transnational and historical contexts.

The course consists of two public key notes and workshops in which the teachers and fellow students comment the papers by participating doctoral candidates.

The key note speakers:
Professor Hanne Marlene Dahl (political science, gender studies), Roskilde University, http://rucforsk.ruc.dk/site/person/hmdahl
“Power, care and gendered governance”

Professor Theresa Wobbe, University of Potsdam (history, sociology of gender), https://www.uni-potsdam.de/geschlechtersoziologie/team/prof-dr-theresa-w...
"How sexual classification works in labour, law, and politics: The case of the International Labour Organization, 1919-2010"

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 Queer(y)ing Kinship, Family and Sexuality 7-8th November 2016 including the lecture by Professor Joanna Mizielinska: "Families of Choice in Poland"  

This PhD course concentrates on the ongoing work on queer and gendered care and support relationships of the participating PhD students. The experienced teachers have the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high international quality.

The expertise of the three teachers is in a wide area of kinship, gender studies and queer theory. All three have published on kinship and "families of choice", and re-invigorated contemporary and methodological approaches on these issues. They are prepared to comment on empirical and/or theoretical work, which builds on either original fieldwork or on commenting on the existing work of various scholars in intersections within the interdisciplinary area of gender studies and queer theory and politics.

The literature on the course comprises scholarship ranging from feminist theory, anthropology, sociology and socio-legal studies to queer studies on kinship, family and "real support" to the history of family, politics of concepts and the new ethics of care. The course focuses on the methodological challenges encountered by those who study new families, intimacies and queer relations, and texts in their doctoral projects.

The course is arranged by the University of Helsinki Doctoral Programme for Gender, Culture, and Society (SKY) together with two Academy of Finland projects ("CoreKin – Contrasting and Re-Imagining Margins of Kinship" and "Wills and Inheritance in Sexually Marginalised Groups"), the Baltic Sea Foundation project "Queer(y)ing Kinship in the Baltic Region" and the Polish Academy of Sciences project "Families of Choice in Poland".

The Teachers:
Ulrika Dahl is Associate Professor of Gender Studies at Uppsala University and PhD program coordinator in Gender Studies and researcher at the Centre for Baltic and Eastern European Studies, Södertörn University, Sweden. She has written and taught widely in the areas of lesbian and queer kinship, gender theory and sexualities, critical femininity studies and on questions of fieldwork methodologies, creative writing, and femme-inist approaches to science. She is the author of Femmes of Power: Exploding Queer Femininities (Serpent's Tail 2008, with Del LaGrace Volcano) and Skamgrepp: Femme-inistiska Essäer (Leopard 2014) as well as of numerous articles in journals such as Gender, Place and Culture, NORA, New Formations, Feminist Theory (forthcoming), and in a range of anthologies. Ulrika is senior editor of lambda Nordica and associate editor of European Journal of Women's Studies. She currently directs 'Queer(y)ing Kinship in the Baltic Region', a research project funded by the Baltic Sea Foundation.

Joanna Mizielinska is Associate Professor at the Institute of Psychology of the Polish Academy of Sciences and Principal Investigator of the project Families of Choice in Poland (2013-2016),which is the first multi-method project on non-heterosexual families in Poland. Her work moves in a large area of intimate relations, gender and sexual politics, and she has published widely on queer families, empirical studies on relatedness, post-social sexualities and translations of queer theory. Specialist on the CEE sexualities, she works currently on the politics of family in Anglo-Saxon queer theory. She is an expert in LGBTIQ issues, conducting qualitative and quantitative research which demanded close co-operation with various LGBTIQ groups and organisations. Previously she worked for the University of Social Sciences and Humanities from 2006-2013 as an Associate Professor at the Institute of Sociology (2009-2013) and as a Director of that Institute (2012). She was a Fullbright scholar at Princeton University, where she worked under the supervision of Professor Judith Butler. Joanna has also been a visiting researcher in the Helsinki University as well as in Sweden. She has published the book Families of choice in Poland. Family life of nonheterosexual persons (with Marta Abramowicz and Agata Stasińska, 2015), co-edited De-Centring Western Sexualities: Central and Eastern European Perspective (with Robert Kulpa, 2011) and edited a special issue of lambda nordica "in transition?: central/eastern European sexualities" (2012).

Antu Sorainen is an Academy Fellow at the Academy of Finland and Docent in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. She has conducted empirical studies in the area of queer domesticities and intimate economies, and published work on law and sexualities, politics of sexualized concepts, as well as on queer history and genealogy. She is the co-author of Siveellisyydestä Seksuaalisuuteen (From Decency to Sexuality) with Tuija Pulkkinen and has published recently on queer inheritance practices. She currently holds a five-year Academy of Finland Fellowship for a project entitled "Wills and Inheritance Practices in Sexually Marginalised Groups" (2014-2019), and a major research team grant for a four-year Academy of Finland project "CoreKin – Contrasting and Re-Imagining Margins of Kinship" (2016-2020).

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DEMOCRATIC THEORY AND GENDERED PRACTICES 
Joint Doctoral Course of Political, Societal and Regional Change PRSC and Gender, Culture and Society doctoral programmes at 30-31st May, 2016

Keynote speakers:
Professor Yvonne Galligan (Queen’s University, Belfast): Interrogating the quality of democracy: Feminist insights

Professor Birte Siim (University of Aalborg): Reframing democracy ‒ intersectional and transnational challenges

Academy Researcher Johanna Kantola (University of Helsinki): Party politics - a challenge or a possibility to gender equality?

Professor Anne Maria Holli (University of Helsinki): Who represents women? Theoretical and empirical insights from a study on the corporatist structures in Finnish public policy-making

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What Does Literature Do for Feminist Politics?  -workshop at 18-20th April, 2016 including public lecture by Suzanne Bost (Professor, Loyola University, Chicago. Department of English)"Memoir Beyond the Self: Animal, Vegetable, and Digital Ecologies in the Work of Aurora Levins Morales"

Feminist researchers have unmasked the mechanisms of authority that have constituted what we think of as truth.  For centuries, ostensibly empirical or neutral methods have overlooked the realities of women and other marginalized groups.  In place of such false objectivity, feminists often privilege subjective accounts (which emphasize the horizons of their particular standpoints), and in place of empirical assertions, feminists have turned to more dialogic, provisional, and open-ended approaches to knowledge production.  Literature would seem, then, to be an ideal feminist method: it makes no claims on reality, it invites readers to participate in a collaborative process, and it often points out the contingency of its own creation.  Creative forms of thinking and creative forms of writing might better help us to unsettle the status quo and to imagine more inclusive worlds.  How might scholars from across the disciplines learn from literature as they conduct their research? Exploring these questions together will help to clarify for each participant how they can enhance their own research and writing in the context of feminist research and gender studies.

In this workshop we focus on exploring and clarifying what doing feminist research means to each of us in practice: How can we use language and writing in our own research project so that we do not fall into oversimplification and misrepresentation of gendered subjectivities familiar from dominant academic rhetoric? How do we incorporate in our own research and writing the feminist alternative, which involves precise attention to the language of a text or a research subject, receptivity to discovering unfamiliar ideas, and awareness of the ways in which our own scholarly language molds ideas into scripted forms.

Teachers
Suzanne Bost is Professor of English, and Graduate Program Director in Women’s and Gender Studies, at Loyola University Chicago.  She is the author of two books, Mulattas and Mestizas: Representing Mixed Identities in the Americas, 1850-2000 (which examines the role of racial mixture in the development of American identity politics) and Encarnación: Illness and Body Politics in Chicana Feminist Literature (which analyzes the premodern Mesoamerican sources that enable Mexican American writers to celebrate permeable embodiment as a feminist ideal).  She has also co-edited, with Frances Aparicio, The Routledge Companion to Latino/a Literature, and has published more than a dozen articles on Latina/o literature, feminist theory, illness and disability, archival research, transnational comparison, food, music, and yoga.  Her current book project focuses on posthumanism and Latina/o memoir.

Elina Penttinen is a university lecturer in Gender Studies, University of Helsinki. Currently she is the project leader of multidisciplinary feminist research project on experience of violence and healing. Her expertise is in feminist methodologies and creative analytics writing. She has published extensively in feminist International relations, experience of war and violence, gender and international crisis management and global political economy. She is the author two books, Joy as a new methodology for International Relations (which develops new methodology for feminist International relations based on posthumanism, positive psychology and scientific study of mindfulness) and Globalization, prostitution and sex-trafficking: a corporeal politics (which explores how globalization produces gendered and ethnicized subjectivities). She is also a pioneer in integrating contemplative practices in university pedagogy. Her current research interests are Intimate Partner Violence, emotional abuse, posthumanism, mindfulness and mindful self-compassion.

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Sexuality in the Context of Feminist Understandings of Gender December 10th and 11th 2015
Joint Course for SKY and The Doctoral Programme in Social Sciences

Teacher: Professor Sue Scott (FAcSS), Centre for Women’s Studies, University of York (UK) and Visiting Professor, University of Helsinki

This ‘Masterclass’ will focus aspects of sexuality through feminist understandings of gender. Sexuality is commonly understood as a special, exotic or problematic area of social life. Here two ‘case study’ examples will be used to develop theoretical and conceptual understanding of gendered sexuality as part of everyday life. First it will be argued that Feminism has rightly problematized many aspects of heterosexual male behavior, as violent and abusive, but that this has in turn meant a lack of focus on the more everyday aspects of gendered sexual interactions thus limiting our understanding and critique of everyday heterosex. How then should we understand and theorize mundane embodied sexual practice? The second ‘case study’ relates to the relationship between childhood and sexuality  - sexuality seen as a special area of life and childhood as a special time of life and the two are seen as inimical to each other. Children are increasingly seen as in need of protection, not only from those who might abuse them, but also from ‘knowing too much too soon’.  It will be argued that this is a significant feminist issue which is complex, contradictory and gendered and in need of further analysis and theorization. How should we think about children/ childhood and sexuality?

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SKY workshop in Budapest 5.-6. November, 2015  

Joint Doctoral Workshop: SKY - Central European University Gender Studies - GSDP
Responsible organizers: Professor Elissa Helms (Head of Gender Studies, CEU), and prof. Tuija Pulkkinen UH/SKY/GSDP).

1. Thematic day:  “How to arrive at a successful end a dissertation project/ How to manage to end a dissertation project”. 
- PhD students and supervisors of both CEU and GSDP/SKY present in panels on and the around the theme of the event which is: the final stages of the dissertation and finishing a thesis.  

 2.  The Day of Presentations and comments on papers by PhD Finnish doctoral students and the doctoral students of CEU based on their ongoing work on their dissertation projects. Supervisors of both CEU and GSDP also comment.

The working language of the event is English. The primary aim of the event is to add to the quality for SKY doctoral work through international exposure and exchange. The additional aim is to share knowledge on good practices in between the doctoral programmes for supervising the finishing stages of doctoral work.
 The Central European University has a widely recognized Gender Studies department, which is one of the largest ones in Europe. Doctoral work at CEU is done in a wide area of intersections; politics, history, anthropology; sexuality, violence, postcommunism, posthumanism, postcolonialism, queer, etc.,. Explore the extensive profile of the unit at:http://gender.ceu.edu/node/27602

The Finnish Gender Studies Doctoral Programme (GSDP) is the national doctoral program of gender studies, which ends it work this year. The Budapest event will be joined by most of the supervising professors and the PhD students of GSDP. See more at http://blogs.helsinki.fi/sukupuolentutkimuksentohtoriohjelma/en/

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How to study categorizations, classifications and gendered governance 

Cross-disciplinary doctoral course 12-13 October 2015, University of Helsinki, Centre Campus (venue tbc)
Organized by doctoral programmes SKY (Gender, Culture and Society) and PSRC (Political, Societal and Regional Changes) and the research project NaDeWe (Nationalism and Democracy in the Welfare State).  

Knowledge and power associated with categorizations and classifications is an important aspect in many studies in different disciplines and with cross-disciplinary ambitions.  In research on public policies, education, health, care, working life, consumption, social movements and ethnic relations, for example, questions emerge concerning the ways individuals, populations and societies are defined and structured as targets of knowledge, policies, control, or empowerment. Gendered governance is a crucial perspective to the practices of categorization and classification, and it appears important to examine national developments in transnational and historical contexts.

The course consists of two public key notes and workshops in which the teachers and fellow students comment the papers by participating doctoral candidates.

Keynote speakers:
Professor Hanne Marlene Dahl (political science, gender studies), Roskilde University, http://rucforsk.ruc.dk/site/person/hmdahl “Power, care and gendered governance”

Professor Theresa Wobbe, University of Potsdam (history, sociology of gender), https://www.uni-potsdam.de/geschlechtersoziologie/team/prof-dr-theresa-w...
“Work and non-work – the ILO’s labour force concept as a case”

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SKY doctoral course: Feminism and Capitalism 22–24th September 2015

Feminist theorists today are increasingly returning to the insight that ‘capitalist society’ must constitute the critical frame for understanding contemporary forms of women’s subordination and feminist struggles to overcome it. This renewed interest in the connections between feminism and capitalism raises a host of difficult questions concerning capitalism, socialism as an alternative to it, the challenges feminism presents to both of them, and the challenges they present to it. What is capitalism? Can it be adequately conceived in gender-blind fashion or is capitalism’s social organization inherently androcentric, incapable in principle of instantiating egalitarian forms of gender relation? How do capitalism’s gender asymmetries relate to its other characteristic forms of domination, including class exploitation, imperialist predation, racial/ethnic subjugation, and ecological devastation? What sorts of challenges do such ‘intersections’ pose for feminist struggles in capitalist contexts? Are feminism and socialism natural ‘bedfellows’? Can ‘socialist-feminist’ theories centered on the organization of social labor do justice to gendered asymmetries of sexuality, status, and psyche? Finally, how do these problems appear today? What specific forms do gender asymmetry and feminist struggle assume in societies where capitalism is financialized, globalizing and neoliberal? How might the current conditions require revising classical theories that have sought to clarify the relations between feminism, capitalism, socialism and social transformation?

We invite applications from students whose work is linked to the above topics and themes. In this course the main emphasis is on the individual PhD projects of the participating PhD students. Students will prepare papers for the course, which will be commented on and discussed by the teachers and the other participants. The aim is to help PhD students working on related topics to develop their individual dissertation projects.  

Teachers:
Cinzia Arruzza (Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, The New School for Social Research, USA). Professor Arruzza’s areas of expertise include: Gender and social reproduction, Ancient Metaphysics and political thought, Neoplatonism. Her research projects and publications can be found at http://www.newschool.edu/nssr/faculty.aspx?id=52618
https://nssr.academia.edu/CinziaArruzza/Papers

Johanna Oksala (Academy of Finland Research Fellow, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture and Art Studies, University of Helsinki). Dr. Oksala’s areas of expertise include: Political Philosophy, Contemporary and 20th C European Philosophy, Feminist Philosophy, Foucault, Phenomenology. Her publications can be found at https://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/johanna-oksala(40398368-50d7-440f-9f25-f0706ee01259).html

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ETHNOGRAPHY AND CULTURAL ANALYSIS WITH THE SPECIAL EMPHASIZE ON THE ARTS  September 8 -10, 2015

Visiting Scholar: Professor Ellen Koskoff, Eastman School of Music, USA
Responsible Tutor:  Professor Pirkko Moisala, Helsinki University

Target Group: Ph.D. students of ethnomusicology, musicology, art studies, anthropology, cultural studies, folkloristics and music education. SKY PhD students privileged, but the course is also open for other PhD Students from HU and other Finnish universities and international universities.

THE WORKSHOP EXAMINES VARIOUS APPROACHES TO THE CULTURAL STUDY OF THE ARTS (ESPECIALLY MUSIC) IN THEIR HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL CONTEXTS. THE AIM OF THE WORKSHOP IS TO HELP INDIVIDUAL STUDENTS FRAME THEIR RESEARCH QUESTIONS AND ARGUMENTS, USING CURRENT METHODS AND THEORETICAL MODELS DRAWN - IN ADDITION TO GENDER STUDIES - PRIMARILY FROM HISTORICAL MUSICOLOGY, ETHNOMUSICOLOGY, AND ANTHROPOLOGY. SPECIAL EMPHASIS WILL BE ON METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES OF ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELDWORK, ANALYSIS, REPRESENTATION, AND PERFORMATIVITY. (Course schedule below.)

 Teachers:
Ellen Koskoff is a professor of ethnomusicology at the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music and director of the ethnomusicology programs there. Her writings about Jewish music, gender and music, and music cognition are widely published. Her work includes Women and Music in Cross-Cultural Perspective (1987), and Music in Lubavitcher Life (2000), winner of the 2002 ASCAP Deems-Taylor award. Her most recent book, A Feminist Ethnomusicology, (University of Illinois Press, 2014) examines a life of research on music and gender. She is a contributor to the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, is the general editor of the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, vol. 3, “The United States and Canada,” and the series editor of the University of Rochester Press’s Eastman/Rochester Studies in Ethnomusicology. She is a former President of the Society for Ethnomusicology and is currently serving as the editor of the Society’s journal, Ethnomusicology.

Pirkko Moisala works as the professor of musicology and ethnomusicology at Helsinki University. Her current project “Deleuzian Music Research” (funded by the Academy of Finland) aims at renewing methods and approaches of music research with the help of the radical process philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and her collaborator Felix Guattari (see http://www.helsinki.fi/deleuzian/). Moisala’s special areas are music anthropology (ethnomusicology) as well as gender and cultural studies of music. Methodologically, her expertise lies in the ethnographic study of musical practices, performance studies, as well as the study of life stories.  Moisala has published widely in gender studies of music, for instance, “Gender and Music” (edited together with B. Diamond), “Gender and Qualitative Methods” (written together with H. Järviluoma and A. Vilkko), as well as “Musiikin toinen sukupuoli” (The Other Sex of Music; biographies of women composers through the ages, written together with R. Valkeila). She has also authored a book on composer Kaija Saariaho.

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SKY doctoral course:  Interpreting Feminist Thinkers 12–13th May 2015

This PhD course concentrates on the ongoing work of participating PhD students, which will be commented on by the experienced teachers and by the co-students of the course with the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high quality. The expertise of the two teachers is in a wide area of feminist thought and feminist thinkers, both have published on Judith Butler’s work and interpreted several other contemporary feminist thinkers. They are prepared to comment on work which builds on interpreting the texts and thought of various thinkers in intersections within the interdisciplinary area of gender studies and feminist thought and politics. The literature on the course comprises scholarship ranging from history of thought, intellectual history, history of concepts, feminist philosophy, genealogy and deconstruction, and the course focuses on the methodological challenges encountered by those who study feminist thinkers and texts in their doctoral projects.

The course includes the lecture by Professor Moya Lloyd:  "Vulnerability, Grievability, and the Body”

The Teachers:
Moya Lloyd is Professor of Political Theory at Loughborough University, UK. She has written widely in the area of feminist political theory, particularly on the work of Judith Butler, as well as on questions of identity politics, sexuality, radical democracy, and the body. She is the author of Beyond Identity Politics: feminism, power, and politics (2005) and Judith Butler: from norms to politics (2007), and the editor of the forthcoming volume Butler and Ethics (2015). She is a former Deputy Director of the Centre for the Advancement of Women in Politics at Queen’s University, Belfast. She currently holds a three-year Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship for a project entitled: ‘Who counts? The political problem of the “human”’.

Tuija Pulkkinen is academy professor and professor of Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her work moves in a large area of philosophy, history and politics, and she has published on political thought, democratic theory, conceptual change, genealogy and performativity of gender. Specialist on Judith Butler, Elizabeth Grozs, and Hannah Arendt, she works currently on the politics of philosophy in feminist theory. Her publications include The Postmodern and Political Agency (2000), and the edited volumes The Ashgate Research Companion to The Politics of Democratization in Europe. Concepts and Histories (2008); Hegel’s Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone? and Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen – poliittisen käsitteen historia [From Sittlichkeit to Sexuality – the History of a Political Concept] (2011).

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Re-thinking Public and Private: Gender, Justice, Violence and Violations 28.-29.4.2015

This SKY course for doctoral students aims to: Introduce students to the central issues in designing and carrying out gender research at postgraduate level and beyond. Consider recent debates on gender and feminist research on the concepts of public, private and violence. Examine what difference it makes to take gender as the subject or object of research.

Of particular concern are the ethical and political issues arising from doing gender research with respect to representing others and seeking to influence and engage with broader social contexts. The course is interdisciplinary, and you will be introduced to a range of perspectives on knowledge production and research practice.

As a result of participating in this course you should be equipped to: Critically assess existing knowledge practices. Identify challenges to 'mainstream knowledge' that come from gendered and feminist perspectives. Explores how knowledge is produced and offers critical assessments of the dominant debates in gendered research practice, asking how we ensure that we conduct research ethically.

Through a discussion on methodological questions, the course provides an opportunity to reflect on and synthesize a range of research design issues. These are addressed on the course through producing and collectively evaluating student designed research proposals and papers.

Teachers:
Linda McKie is Professor of Sociology at the School of Applied Social Sciences, Durham University, UK. She is also an Associate Director of the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, University of Edinburgh. Linda has published over 120 peer reviewed articles, books and chapters and been a member of the editorial boards for a range of journals including Sociology, Sociology of Health and Illness, and Work, Employment and Society. Linda is passionate in her support for early career colleagues and runs regular writing courses and retreats on planning and writing publications and research proposals. In 2004
she was elected to the UK Academy of Social sciences and was a member of the Sociology Unit of Assessment Panel for the UK Research Assessment Framework in 2014.

Marjut Jyrkinen is Professor in Gender Studies 2012-15 at University of Helsinki (UH). She has her PhD in Management and Organisation studies, Hanken School of Economics, and Docentship in Faculty of Social Sciences, UH. Her current research interests are in the areas of globalisation, violations and violence, intersectionalities and worklife, and research on gender, management and organisations. Marjut is Co-director of the SKY Doctoral Programme.

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 How to Study History of Sexuality and Gender 3-5th November 2014
 This course seeks to explore the current theoretical and methodological challenges when studying the histories of sexuality and gender. How are these histories shaped by different understandings of identity, community and identification? What happens when we approach the past through particular spaces, groups or individuals; through nation states or transnational flows; through literature and the arts; through oral history; through newspapers or court cases; or through material culture? How can queer theory help or hinder our endeavours? 

Some of the key issues and challenges include combining sexuality and intersectional analysis; understanding the shifting nature of sexuality, gender and historical processes; and analyzing the impact of neoliberal governance and changing legislations on sexualities. A special stress will be on combining empirical interview techniques in the historical study on non-conventional sexualities, in queer histories, and in contemporary epistemologies of past intimacies. The course engages with a number of key analytic concepts of sexuality and gender analysis, such as power, institutions, law, policy-making, and explores them through history lenses.

We seek discussions on issues such as:
- What does it mean to take a historical approach to gender and sexuality?
- How can we gain purchase on understandings and cultures of gender and sexuality in the past? Or, for that matter, desires, emotions and subjectivities long gone?
- What sources are available and what are the problems and possibilities associated with them?
- How can we study present configurations through a historical lens?

The aim of the workshop is to advance the high quality of each individual PhD project and the feasibility of the planned timetable for submitting the dissertation. The course offers a deep insight into the theoretical and methodological issues at stake in the study of histories of sexuality and gender.

Teachers:
Dr Matt Cook is Senior Lecturer in History and Gender Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, a Co-director of the Raphael Samuel History Centre, and an editor of History Workshop Journal. He is the author of London and the Culture of Homosexuality, 1885 – 1914 (2003), lead author and editor of A Gay History of Britain (2007), Queer Domesticities (2014), and co-editor of Queer 1950s (2012; with Heike Bauer) and Queer Cities, Queer Cultures (2014; with Jennifer Evans).

Dr Antu Sorainen is Docent in Gender Studies and Academy Research Fellow at the University of Helsinki. Her research project Wills and Inheritance in Sexually Marginalized Groups 2014-2019 looks at how queer people organize their care and support relations, and whether they write wills on the benefit of their “chosen” kin, lovers and friends. Sorainen has published on the history of sexual criminal law and non-heterosexual urban history. She co-authored a book on the conceptual history of Sittlichkeit with Tuija Pulkkinen (Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen, Finnish Literature Society 2011). Her chapter Two cities of Helsinki? One liberally gay and one practically queer? was published in Queer Cities, Queer Cultures, edited by Jennifer Evans and Matt Cook (2014).

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SKY:n kirjoitusseminaari (10 op) 17.10.–12.12.2014  

Tuntuuko väitöskirjan kirjoittaminen työläältä ja yksinäiseltä puuhalta? Kaipaatko kirjoittamista koskevia avuja ja neuvoja? Tahdotko kirjoittaa rakentavan kritiikin ja rohkaisevan kannustuksen vauhdittamana yhden väitöskirjasi luvun valmiiksi?

SKY:n kirjoitusseminaarin tavoitteena on siivittää osanottajat kirjoittamaan seminaarin aikana yksi tutkimuksensa luku tai alaluku eli noin 35 liuskaa väitöskirjaansa. Tekstit syntyvät vähä vähältä seminaarin aikana – osanottajat kirjoittavat noin 5 liuskaa tekstiä viikossa ja palauttavat katkelmat määräpäivinä verkkoympäristö Moodleen.

Oman kirjoitustehtävän ohella SKY:n kirjoitusseminaarissa on tarkoitus oppia kirjoittamisesta lukemalla ja kommentoimalla muiden seminaariin osallistuvien väitöskirjakatkelmia sekä keskustelemalla yhdessä kirjoittamiseen ja kirjoitukseen liittyvistä kysymyksistä. Seminaarilaisilla on pääsy toistensa teksteihin Moodlessa, ja jokainen sitoutuu lukemaan muiden katkelmat sekä ideoimaan niistä vähintäänkin yhden kriittisen ja yhden kannustavan kommentin. Kommentteja ei kuitenkaan anneta verkossa vaan kasvokkaisissa kohtaamisissa, joiden on tarkoitus tarjota vaihtelua kirjoitustyön yksinäisyyteen. Tapaamisia on viikon välein ja kukin niistä kestää 3 tuntia. Virvokkeet ja eväät ovat sallittuja!

SKY:n kirjoitusseminaari on siis nimenomaan kirjoittamiseen ja kirjoitukseen keskittyvä kurssi, jonka aikana lähestymme aihepiiriä kahdesta eri näkökulmasta. Yhtäältä syvennymme tapaamisissamme kirjoittamisen käytäntöihin kuten itsensä motivoimiseen, kirjoitustyötä mahdollisesti häiritseviin seikkoihin sekä mahdollisimman tehokkaisiin ja antoisiin työskentelytapoihin. Seminaarin vetäjä pitää alustuksen ja tarjoaa mahdollisuuden keskustelutuokioon näistä teemoista jokaisen tapaamiskerran alussa. Ennen kaikkea kurssilla syvennytään kuitenkin kirjoituksen laatuun kuten tutkimustekstin jäsennykseen, ajatuksenjuoksun sujuvuuteen, argumentaation ymmärrettävyyteen, teoriaosuuksien ja analyysiosuuksien toisiinsa suhteuttamiseen sekä tyylin kysymyksiin. Näitä teemoja pohditaan tapaamisissa kommentoitaessa muiden tekstikatkelmia.

Seminaarin vetäjänä toimii FT Eva Maria Korsisaari, joka on väitellyt feministisen filosofian ja feministisen kirjallisuudentutkimuksen alalta sekä toiminut aiemmin tutkijatohtorina ja yliopistonlehtorina (ma.) sukupuolentutkimuksen oppiaineen piirissä. 

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SKY Doctoral  course: Insights and reflections on empirical field work in studying young people 28th October – Wednesday 29th October includin  talk by Prof. Shane Blackman "Doing Ethnography with Young People: from description to theory".

Organisers: SKY -doctoral programme, YUNET- youth research network, AGORA for the study of Social Justice & Equality in education -research centre

Aim: To offer deep insights into empirical fieldwork experience in studying young people.

To whom: SKY PhD students, other PhD students from the University of Helsinki and other universities who are planning, doing or have done empirical field work as part of their research. The course is thoroughly multidisciplinary and diverse aspects and approaches related to studying young people are welcomed (e.g. youth transitions, youth cultures, gendered approaches, multiculturalism, educational, social scientific, socio-legal or criminological frameworks). Students from varied scientific backgrounds and interests are invited to participate.

Teachers: Professor Shane Blackman, Professor of Cultural Studies Department of Media, Art and Design at Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent, Professor Päivi Honkatukia, University of Tampere (Youth Studies), Professor Kristiina Brunila (Social Justice and Equality in Education, University of Helsinki).

Substance: The course will be organized as a workshop investigating diverse aspects and meanings of the empirical fieldwork in the research process when studying young people. The focus will be in qualitative approaches, and issues such as access to the field, interaction and types of relationships in the field will be discussed, particularly in terms of their effects on the knowledge gained in research. Also questions as to how to move beyond and analytically connect the fieldwork experience to the theoretical frameworks of the study will be discussed.

The format: 

1) open advanced seminar talk by Prof. Shane Blackman, followed by a discussion in which the PhD students will take part.  The title of the talk: "Doing Ethnography with Young People: from description to theory". The talk will be focusing on what is distinctive about ethnography, its assumptions, approach, tradition and positionality, issues within fieldwork such as access, interactions, relationships/emotions, how to do interpretation and generate theory.

2) The talk is followed by a one-day PhD workshop around the talk: The PhD students will each prepare a paper (10-12 pages) and present it in the workshop. All the other participating PhD students as well as Prof. Blackman, Prof. Brunila & Prof. Honkatukia will comment on every paper.

The papers should include and discuss the following themes/questions:

outline your research issue to someone outside university

what social research tradition and discipline does your research project fit into?

 how will you or how did you record your data, did you share your data with the researched?  Also were you able to retrieve data quickly?

describe how you will or did first make contact with your research participants? (easy or hard?)

 how would you describe reflexivity in terms of your research position prior to and then when in the field?

describe one or two difficult moments during fieldwork and how you tried to resolve them?

how did you incorporate theory into your thesis? Were you happy about this?

have you delivered some of your initial research findings, if yes, where? If you have not explain why?

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 Representation 30th September - 1st October 2014

Representation is a fundamental concept in contemporary debates in feminist theory and cultural and social theory. It is widely used as an analytical tool in explaining how gendered, sexualised, classed and ethnic identities are constructed. Much of the feminist theorisation
on representation investigates how social groups such as women, ethnic or sexual minorities are (under)represented in different cultural domains (art, media, popular culture, popular rhetoric, economic theory, academic theory etc.), what kind of impact representations
have on these groups, and how dominant representations can be challenged to open up space for recognising the underrepresented groups and to produce a more accurate representation of power relations in contemporary society.

The SKY doctoral course "Representation" is a critical examination of this widely used and contested concept, and how it can be used and challenged in the individual PhD projects. The course focuses on the on-going work of the students and their papers will be commented on by the experienced teachers and by the co-students of the course. The aim of the course is to help the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high quality and within the time-frame they have set to themselves.

The course draws specifically from the ground-breaking work on representation by Beverley Skeggs. Her main theoretical interest is in class: how class features in representations, and how it is discussed in a variety of ways through other concepts such as nation, race,
gender and sexuality.

Teachers
Beverley Skeggs (Professor in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London, UK). Professor Skeggs is sociologist, whose work includes influential studies on class and value. Her groundbreaking book Formations of Class and Gender: Becoming Respectable (1997) is a longitudinal ethnography of subjectivity which calls for the need to include class in theorisations of gender, identity and power. A continuation of this investigation is Class, Self, Culture (2004), which is a critique of the idea of self and an exploration of the different ways class still circulates as a form of value that is attaches to different bodies. Her more recent research includes a monograph Reacting to Reality TV: Audience, Performance, Value (2012) which investigates how different groups of women respond to television and challenges the conventional notion of reading representations and emphasizes affective reaction. Professor Skeggs is also the joint managing editor of the journal The Sociological Review.
http://www.gold.ac.uk/sociology/staff/skeggs/.

Annamari Vänskä (Collegium Researcher and Adjunct Professor, TIAS - The Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Turku). Vänskä is expert in fashion studies, visual culture, visualised consumer culture, contemporary art, critical gender theory and childhood studies. She is interested in exploring how commercial visual culture, especially advertising, is used in shaping and challenging identities, how clothes and their representations are read, and how images are used in identity construction. Vänskäs latest book Muodikas lapsuus. Lapset muotikuvissa (Fashionable Childhood. Children in fashion advertising, Gaudeamus 2012; forthcoming as English translation in 2015 via Bloomsbury Publishing) is an investigation of the multitude of ways in which advertising representing children are used for
affecting the consumer-viewers. http://www.annamarivanska.com.

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Gender and Political Analysis16-17 September 2014 including Emanuela Lombardo's talk 'The symbolic representation of gender' 

How to do gender and political analysis today? This course seeks to unpack the current theoretical and methodological challenges when studying gender and politics. Gender and political analysis has shifted from studying women to gender analyses and, more recently, to analyzing the discursive and material reproduction of gender. Some of the key issues and challenges include combining gender and intersectional analysis; understanding the shifting nature of politics, polity and political processes; and analyzing the impact of neoliberal governance on feminisms. This course engages with a number of key analytic concepts of politics and political analysis, such as power, institutions, polity, policy-making, and explores them through gender+ lenses. We seek discussions on issues such as:

- What does it mean to take a gender+ approach to political analysis?
- How to apply a gender+ approach to analysis of power?
- How to apply a gender+ approach to institutionalism?
- How to study agency?

Teachers:
Emanuela Lombardo is Associate Professor at the Department of Political Science and Administration II of Madrid Complutense University (Spain). Her research concerns gender equality policies, especially in the European Union and Spain, Europeanization, and gender and political representation. On these issues she has published articles in peer reviewed journals as well as chapters in edited volumes. Her last edited book, with Maxime Forest, is The Europeanization of Gender Equality Policies (Palgrave 2012) and her last monograph, authored with Petra Meier, is The Symbolic Representation of Gender (Ashgate 2014). For further information see http://www.ucm.es/info/target/

Johanna Kantola is Academy Research Fellow in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her research focuses on feminist theories of the state, gender and the European Union, representation, gender equality policies, state feminism, and intersectionality. Her books include Gender and the European Union (Palgrave, 2010) and Feminists Theorize the State (Palgrave, 2006). As an editor she has published Changing State Feminism (Palgrave, 2007, with Joyce Outshoorn), The Oxford Handbook on Gender and Politics (Oxford University Press, 2013, with Georgina Waylen, Karen Celis and Laurel Weldon), two edited volumes in Finnish, and a special issue of International Feminist Journal of Politics. She is the Editor of Palgrave Macmillan's Gender and Politics Book Series with Judith Squires. For further information see http://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/fi/person/jekantol

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SKY doctoral course: Feminist Thought and Biopolitics 16-18th June 2014 including the lecture of Professor *Penelope Deutscher:"That Death Which is Not One: Woman as Exception in Derrida's /The Death Penalty/" *

This PhD course concentrates on the ongoing work of participating PhD students, which will be commented on by the experienced teachers and by the co-students of the course with the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high quality. The expertise of the two teachers is in a large area of feminist thought and politics and they are prepared to comment work on various intersections within the interdisciplinary area of gender studies, and feminist thought and politics. The literature on the course comprises scholarship ranging from feminist philosophy, genealogy, and deconstruction to biopolitics, reproductive biopolitics, necropolitics and thanatopolitics.

The Teachers:
Penelope Deutscher is Professor in the Department of Philosophy and an affiliate of the Comparative Literary Studies and Gender and Sexualities programs at Northwestern University. She is the author of /The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Ambiguity, Conversion, Resistance/ (Cambridge U.P, 2008), /How to Read Derrida/ (Granta/Norton 2005), /A Politics of Impossible Difference: The Later Work of Luce Irigaray/ (Cornell U.P., 2002) and /Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy /(Routledge 1997). She co-edited /Repenser le politique: l'apport du féminisme. /(co-edited, with**Françoise Collin, Campagne première/Les Cahiers du Grif, 2004) and /Enigmas: Essays on Sarah Kofman/, co-edited, with Kelly Oliver (Cornell U.P. 1999). In 2000 she was guest editor of a special issue of Hypatia, Contemporary French Women Philosophers. She is the coeditor of a forthcoming volume of essays on Foucault and Derrida with Columbia University Press, and completing work on /Foucault's Children: Biopolitics, Thanatopolitics, and Reproductive Futurism/.

Tuija Pulkkinen is academy professor and professor of Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her work moves in a large area of philosophy, history and politics, and she has published on political thought, democratic theory, conceptual change, genealogy and performativity of gender. Specialist on Derrida and Foucault, on Judith Butler, Elizabeth Grozs, and Hannah Arendt, she works currently on the politics of philosophy in feminist theory. Her publications include /The Postmodern and Political Agency/ (2000), and the edited volumes /The Ashgate Research Companion to The Politics of Democratization in Europe. Concepts and Histories/ (2008); /Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone?/ and /Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen -- poliittisen käsitteen historia [From Sittlichkeit to Sexuality -- the History of a Political Concept] /(2011).

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Third World Feminism and Post-Colonial Theory and Agency 26-28.5. 2014

Third world feminisms have emerged from many routes to challenge prevailing ethnocentrism in contemporary feminism (Trinh T. Minh-Ha, Chandra Mohanty, Gayatri Spivak). Post-colonial theorists have pointed out the heavy baggage of colonialism that continues in the hierarchical relationship between the West and the Rest in the form of scholarly and other neo-colonialism, neoliberal globalisation and deepening gap between the globally well-off and the poor.

Islamic feminism has emerged to criticize the double victimisation of Muslim women, and to draw out a new platform to interpret the holy texts (Amina Wadud, Kecia Ali, Ziba Mir-Hosseini ). Similar approaches in studies of other religions pave the way to some of the most exciting new scholarship in the entire field. Feminist engagements in law point out the complexity in looking at law as domination and law as social control (Sally Falk Moore 2001).

Conventional dualisms that have patterned earlier feminist scholarship are challenged in post-colonial feminism and replaced by intersectionally informed approaches that open up marginalised, hidden and different agency. Some of the key notions of feminist scholarship such as patriarchy, private vs. public, body and subjectivity are enriched in studies that take fresh looks at fixed dualisms and taken for granted hierarchical relationships.

Significant contribution comes from practical research carried out among men and women in non-Western, transnational and multicultural environments using such methods as ethnographic observation, life course studies and critical discourse analysis. We invite applications from students whose work link to the above topics and themes.

The Teachers: 
Nefissa Naguib (Senior Researcher, Chr. Michelsen Institute, Norway; Professor II at the Institute for Social Anthropology at the University of Bergen). Anthropologist whose work links culture and history with politics. Her studies include themes such as culture and the moral economy of food and water; gender and religious minorities; faith-based activism; humanitarianism and military efforts. Her research projects and publications can be accessed http://www.cmi.no/staff/?nefissa-naguib

Susanne Dahlgren (Senior Lecturer, Development Studies, University of Helsinki). Anthropologist interested in legal anthropology, Islamic law, contemporary social movements, politics and revolution, and moralities of faith and religious practice. Her publications can be accessed https://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/susanne-dahlgren%284c6...

Mulki Al-Sharmani (Academy Research Fellow, Comparative Religion, University of Helsinki). With PhD from Johns Hopkins University, her research focuses on Islamic feminism, Muslim family laws and legal activism, and refugees and diasporic communities. Her publications can be accessed https://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/mulki-alsharmani%28751...

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Feminist Theory and Feminist Politics,  6-8.5. 2014 including Athena Athanasiou’s public talk: "Unthinkable Mourning: Counter-Memory and Feminist Political Subjectivity in Post-Yugoslavia."  

In this course the main emphasis is on the individual PhD projects of the participating PhD students. The ongoing work of students will be commented on by the experienced teachers and by the co-students of the course with the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high quality and within the time-frame they have set to themselves.

The expertise of the teachers is in a large area of feminist scholarship ranging from ethnography, performative political protests, and biopolitics to feminist philosophy, Luce Irigaray’s thought, and Hegel; from regional studies in the the Balkans, and current crisis in Greece to the notions of subjectivity, responsiveness and responsibility.

The Teachers:
Athena Athanasiou (Ass. Prof. of Anthropology Panteion University, Greece).  Anthropologist, who has published on feminist theory,  technologies of the  body, biopolitics, psychoanalysis, nationalism, postcoloniality, affect, feminist movements, 'Women in Black',  the Balkans, and Greece in crisis.   

Elena Tzelepis (Dr, Centre of Advance Study, Sofia), Specialist on continental philosophy, who has written on contemporary reading s of ancient philosophy, Irigaray and Antigone, the intersections of the political and the psychic, and the workings of critique. 

Tuija Pulkkinen (Academy professor, University of Helsinki, Gender Studies). Has published on political thought, nationalism, democratic theory and conceptual change;  and on genealogy and performativity of gender. Works currently on politics of philosophy within contemporary feminist theory.

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SKY START: 1/14 Workshop Meeting (5.-6. June 2014)  including lecture by professor PENELOPE DEUTSCHER (Nortwestern University) ‘That Death Which is Not One: Woman as Exception in Derrida’s The Death Penalty’

In his recently published Death Penalty seminar, Derrida describes death as distributed between the threshold states of termination of heart, brain and breath. He  considers the death penalty in terms of a phantasmatic sovereign decision : the determination of the moment of another's death. But he also revisits a longstanding dialogue with Foucault. As Derrida returns to Discipline and Punish,  as he too considers the perversions of philanthropic, humanist cruelty, as both look back at the same passages  from Beccaria, an encounter takes  shape between Foucault and Derrida's treatments of sovereign power, disciplinary power, souls, cases, sovereign decisions, and biopolitical concerns. So too does an encounter take place between the  images of  nation and progress  given (as Derrida observes) sexualized connotations, and images of the woman (sometimes reproductive)  before the sometimes deadly law of the nation (again, sometimes sexualized).  What kind of provocation to Foucault can we find in Derrida’s renewed interest in Death Penalty in sexual difference, and in the “sex which is not one”  of the "death which is not one."

Penelope Deutscher is Professor in the Department of Philosophy and an affiliate of  the  Comparative Literary Studies and Gender and Sexualities programs at Northwestern University. She is the author of The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Ambiguity, Conversion, Resistance (Cambridge U.P, 2008),  How to Read Derrida (Granta/Norton 2005), A Politics of Impossible Difference: The Later Work of Luce Irigaray (Cornell U.P., 2002) and Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy (Routledge 1997). She co-edited Repenser le  politique: l’apport du féminisme. (co-edited, with Françoise Collin, Campagne première/Les Cahiers du Grif, 2004) and  Enigmas: Essays on Sarah Kofman.,co-edited, with Kelly Oliver ( Cornell U.P. 1999). In 2000 she was guest editor of a special issue of Hypatia, Contemporary French Women Philosophers. She is the coeditor of a forthcoming volume of essays on Foucault and Derrida with Columbia University Press, and completing work on Foucault's Children: Biopolitics, Thanatopolitics, and Reproductive Futurism.

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Open lunch time seminar : Emanuela Lombardo (Madrid, Complutense University, Spain) 
"Gender mainstreaming and policy responses to the economic crisis: The ‘unintended consequences’ of EU and national policymaking on Spanish gender equality policies"

The economic crisis in Europe represents a challenge for gender equality policies, especially in Southern member states, such as Spain, that experience great economic difficulties and high levels of public debt. This paper argues that European Union (EU) and national policymaking in times of economic crisis, by not mainstreaming gender in their policymaking, have had ‘unintended consequences’ on Spanish gender equality policies. The paper explores the policy reforms that the Spanish government enacted from 2010 onwards, in response to the EU anti-crisis guidelines, and their consequences on gender equality policies. It analyses changes in the Spanish equality machinery, employment and care, and gender violence policies, taking into account the national political context, welfare and gender regimes, and institutionalization of gender equality prior to the crisis.

Emanuela Lombardo,PhD in Politics at the University of Reading (UK), is Lecturer at the Department of Political Science and Administration II of Madrid Complutense University (Spain). She has worked as researcher in different European projects (European Commission FP4, FP5, and FP6, and POM Programs). Her research concerns gender equality policies, particularly in the European Union and Spain, gender mainstreaming, and gender and political representation. On these issues she has published articles in refereed journals and chapters in edited books. Her last book, edited with Maxime Forest, is The Europeanization of Gender Equality Policies (Palgrave 2012). Her forthcoming monograph, authored with Petra Meier, is The Symbolic Representation of Gender (Ashgate). For further information see http://www.ucm.es/info/target/

Are you working on a PhD thesis from a gender perspective? -SKY open seminar: 9.1.2014

 This seminar is intended to the program's supervisors and to its potential PhD students who want to hear more about it and participate in planning it. You are warmly welcome to join us.

Welcome and introductions – Johanna Kantola, Gender Studies
Introduction to University of Helsinki Doctoral Programmes – Maija Urponen, Faculty of Arts
Introduction to SKY – Tuija Pulkkinen, Gender Studies
Discussion and Questions

Introduction to the session – Johanna Kantola, Gender Studies
Introduction to teaching, courses and supervision in SKY – Tuija Pulkkinen, Gender Studies
Discussion and feedback

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Day of Daring - Lecture and workshop September 22, 2016 at 10-16

What’s the story behind the world famous “Congrats, you have an all male panel!” website? How can the internet be used for innovative research methodologies and dissemination of research results? How to use visual artistic methods in supporting the research process and/or publishing the results in a different way? How to build up courage and act in solidarity with other scholars? The Day of Daring offers answers to these questions and more. The workshop will offer a creative angle to your own research project and give you new confidence to present your work for academic and wider audiences.

Dr. Saara Särmä is the co-founder and president of Feminist think thank Hattu and the creator of “Congrats, you have an all male panel!” website.  Her doctoral dissertation in International Relations (2014) titled Junk Feminism and Nuclear Wannabes – Collaging Parodies of Iran and North Korea focused on internet parody images and developed a unique and innovative art-based collage methodology for studying world politics.  She’s interested in politics of visuality, feminist academic activism, and laughter in world politics. Together with her co-conspirators in Hattu, she aims to smash the patriarchy through the means of radical fun. Hattu has developed successful and empowering concepts such as the School of Daring and Swearing Soirees. 

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Queer(y)ing Kinship, Family and Sexuality, 7-8 November 2016 including lecture by Professor Joanna Mizielinska: "Families of Choice in Poland" 

This PhD course concentrates on the ongoing work on queer and gendered care and support relationships of the participating PhD students. The experienced teachers have the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high international quality.

The expertise of the three teachers is in a wide area of kinship, gender studies and queer theory. All three have published on kinship and "families of choice", and re-invigorated contemporary and methodological approaches on these issues. They are prepared to comment on empirical and/or theoretical work, which builds on either original fieldwork or on commenting on the existing work of various scholars in intersections within the interdisciplinary area of gender studies and queer theory and politics.

The literature on the course comprises scholarship ranging from feminist theory, anthropology, sociology and socio-legal studies to queer studies on kinship, family and "real support" to the history of family, politics of concepts and the new ethics of care. The course focuses on the methodological challenges encountered by those who study new families, intimacies and queer relations, and texts in their doctoral projects.

The course is arranged by the University of Helsinki Doctoral Programme for Gender, Culture, and Society (SKY) together with two Academy of Finland projects ("CoreKin – Contrasting and Re-Imagining Margins of Kinship" and "Wills and Inheritance in Sexually Marginalised Groups"), the Baltic Sea Foundation project "Queer(y)ing Kinship in the Baltic Region" and the Polish Academy of Sciences project "Families of Choice in Poland".

Teachers:
Ulrika Dahl is Associate Professor of Gender Studies at Uppsala University and PhD program coordinator in Gender Studies and researcher at the Centre for Baltic and Eastern European Studies, Södertörn University, Sweden. She has written and taught widely in the areas of lesbian and queer kinship, gender theory and sexualities, critical femininity studies and on questions of fieldwork methodologies, creative writing, and femme-inist approaches to science. She is the author of Femmes of Power: Exploding Queer Femininities (Serpent's Tail 2008, with Del LaGrace Volcano) and Skamgrepp: Femme-inistiska Essäer (Leopard 2014) as well as of numerous articles in journals such as Gender, Place and Culture, NORA, New Formations, Feminist Theory (forthcoming), and in a range of anthologies. Ulrika is senior editor of lambda Nordica and associate editor of European Journal of Women's Studies. She currently directs 'Queer(y)ing Kinship in the Baltic Region', a research project funded by the Baltic Sea Foundation.

Joanna Mizielinska is Associate Professor at the Institute of Psychology of the Polish Academy of Sciences and Principal Investigator of the project Families of Choice in Poland (2013-2016),which is the first multi-method project on non-heterosexual families in Poland. Her work moves in a large area of intimate relations, gender and sexual politics, and she has published widely on queer families, empirical studies on relatedness, post-social sexualities and translations of queer theory. Specialist on the CEE sexualities, she works currently on the politics of family in Anglo-Saxon queer theory. She is an expert in LGBTIQ issues, conducting qualitative and quantitative research which demanded close co-operation with various LGBTIQ groups and organisations. Previously she worked for the University of Social Sciences and Humanities from 2006-2013 as an Associate Professor at the Institute of Sociology (2009-2013) and as a Director of that Institute (2012). She was a Fullbright scholar at Princeton University, where she worked under the supervision of Professor Judith Butler. Joanna has also been a visiting researcher in the Helsinki University as well as in Sweden. She has published the book Families of choice in Poland. Family life of nonheterosexual persons (with Marta Abramowicz and Agata Stasińska, 2015), co-edited De-Centring Western Sexualities: Central and Eastern European Perspective (with Robert Kulpa, 2011) and edited a special issue of lambda nordica "in transition?: central/eastern European sexualities" (2012).

Antu Sorainen is an Academy Fellow at the Academy of Finland and Docent in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. She has conducted empirical studies in the area of queer domesticities and intimate economies, and published work on law and sexualities, politics of sexualized concepts, as well as on queer history and genealogy. She is the co-author of Siveellisyydestä Seksuaalisuuteen (From Decency to Sexuality) with Tuija Pulkkinen and has published recently on queer inheritance practices. She currently holds a five-year Academy of Finland Fellowship for a project entitled "Wills and Inheritance Practices in Sexually Marginalised Groups" (2014-2019), and a major research team grant for a four-year Academy of Finland project "CoreKin – Contrasting and Re-Imagining Margins of Kinship" (2016-2020).

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DEMOCRATIC THEORY AND GENDERED PRACTICES  30-31st May, 2016 including lecture by Professor Yvonne Galligan (Queen’s University, Belfast): Interrogating the quality of democracy: Feminist insights
Professor Birte Siim (University of Aalborg): Reframing democracy ‒ intersectional and transnational challenges

Teachers
Academy Researcher Johanna Kantola (University of Helsinki): Party politics - a challenge or a possibility to gender equality?

Professor Anne Maria Holli (University of Helsinki): Who represents women? Theoretical and empirical insights from a study on the corporatist structures in Finnish public policy-making

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What Does Literature Do for Feminist Politics? 18-20 April, 2016 includin public talk by Suzanne Bost (Professor, Loyola University, Chicago. Department of English)  "Memoir Beyond the Self: Animal, Vegetable, and Digital Ecologies in the Work of Aurora Levins Morales"

Feminist researchers have unmasked the mechanisms of authority that have constituted what we think of as truth.  For centuries, ostensibly empirical or neutral methods have overlooked the realities of women and other marginalized groups.  In place of such false objectivity, feminists often privilege subjective accounts (which emphasize the horizons of their particular standpoints), and in place of empirical assertions, feminists have turned to more dialogic, provisional, and open-ended approaches to knowledge production.  Literature would seem, then, to be an ideal feminist method: it makes no claims on reality, it invites readers to participate in a collaborative process, and it often points out the contingency of its own creation.  Creative forms of thinking and creative forms of writing might better help us to unsettle the status quo and to imagine more inclusive worlds.  How might scholars from across the disciplines learn from literature as they conduct their research? Exploring these questions together will help to clarify for each participant how they can enhance their own research and writing in the context of feminist research and gender studies.

In this workshop we focus on exploring and clarifying what doing feminist research means to each of us in practice:

How can we use language and writing in our own research project so that we do not fall into oversimplification and misrepresentation of gendered subjectivities familiar from dominant academic rhetoric?

How do we incorporate in our own research and writing the feminist alternative, which involves precise attention to the language of a text or a research subject, receptivity to discovering unfamiliar ideas, and awareness of the ways in which our own scholarly language molds ideas into scripted forms.

Teachers
Suzanne Bost is Professor of English, and Graduate Program Director in Women’s and Gender Studies, at Loyola University Chicago.  She is the author of two books, Mulattas and Mestizas: Representing Mixed Identities in the Americas, 1850-2000 (which examines the role of racial mixture in the development of American identity politics) and Encarnación: Illness and Body Politics in Chicana Feminist Literature (which analyzes the premodern Mesoamerican sources that enable Mexican American writers to celebrate permeable embodiment as a feminist ideal).  She has also co-edited, with Frances Aparicio, The Routledge Companion to Latino/a Literature, and has published more than a dozen articles on Latina/o literature, feminist theory, illness and disability, archival research, transnational comparison, food, music, and yoga.  Her current book project focuses on posthumanism and Latina/o memoir.

Elina Penttinen is a university lecturer in Gender Studies, University of Helsinki. Currently she is the project leader of multidisciplinary feminist research project on experience of violence and healing. Her expertise is in feminist methodologies and creative analytics writing. She has published extensively in feminist International relations, experience of war and violence, gender and international crisis management and global political economy. She is the author two books, Joy as a new methodology for International Relations (which develops new methodology for feminist International relations based on posthumanism, positive psychology and scientific study of mindfulness) and Globalization, prostitution and sex-trafficking: a corporeal politics (which explores how globalization produces gendered and ethnicized subjectivities). She is also a pioneer in integrating contemplative practices in university pedagogy. Her current research interests are Intimate Partner Violence, emotional abuse, posthumanism, mindfulness and mindful self-compassion.

 

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Sexuality in the Context of Feminist Understandings of Gender December 10th and 11th 2015 including Professor Sue Scott’s (Centre for Women’s Studies, University of York (UK) and Visiting Professor, University of Helsinki) public talk: ‘Problematizing the Specialness of Sex’

This ‘Masterclass’ will focus aspects of sexuality through feminist understandings of gender. Sexuality is commonly understood as a special, exotic or problematic area of social life. Here two ‘case study’ examples will be used to develop theoretical and conceptual understanding of gendered sexuality as part of everyday life. First it will be argued that Feminism has rightly problematized many aspects of heterosexual male behavior, as violent and abusive, but that this has in turn meant a lack of focus on the more everyday aspects of gendered sexual interactions thus limiting our understanding and critique of everyday heterosex. How then should we understand and theorize mundane embodied sexual practice? The second ‘case study’ relates to the relationship between childhood and sexuality  - sexuality seen as a special area of life and childhood as a special time of life and the two are seen as inimical to each other. Children are increasingly seen as in need of protection, not only from those who might abuse them, but also from ‘knowing too much too soon’.  It will be argued that this is a significant feminist issue which is complex, contradictory and gendered and in need of further analysis and theorization. How should we think about children/ childhood and sexuality?

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SKY workshop in Budapest 5.-6. November, 2015. “How to arrive at a successful end a dissertation project/ How to manage to end a dissertation project”. 

Joint Doctoral Workshop: SKY - Central European University Gender Studies - GSDP
This is a joint two-day workshop with University of Helsinki PhD-students and PhD Students of the Gender Studies doctoral programme in Central European University Budapest, and it will be organized in co-operation with the Finnish national Gender Studies Doctoral Programme (GSDP).  
Responsible organizers: Professor Elissa Helms (Head of Gender Studies, CEU), and prof. Tuija Pulkkinen UH/SKY/GSDP).

The working language of the event is English. The primary aim of the event is to add to the quality for SKY doctoral work through international exposure and exchange. The additional aim is to share knowledge on good practices in between the doctoral programmes for supervising the finishing stages of doctoral work.
 The Central European University has a widely recognized Gender Studies department, which is one of the largest ones in Europe. Doctoral work at CEU is done in a wide area of intersections; politics, history, anthropology; sexuality, violence, postcommunism, posthumanism, postcolonialism, queer, etc.,. Explore the extensive profile of the unit at:http://gender.ceu.edu/node/27602

The Finnish Gender Studies Doctoral Programme (GSDP) is the national doctoral program of gender studies, which ends it work this year. The Budapest event will be joined by most of the supervising professors and the PhD students of GSDP. See more at http://blogs.helsinki.fi/sukupuolentutkimuksentohtoriohjelma/en/

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How to study categorizations, classifications and gendered governance 12-13 October 2015
Organized by doctoral programmes SKY (Gender, Culture and Society) and PSRC (Political, Societal and Regional Changes) and the research project NaDeWe (Nationalism and Democracy in the Welfare State).  

Knowledge and power associated with categorizations and classifications is an important aspect in many studies in different disciplines and with cross-disciplinary ambitions.  In research on public policies, education, health, care, working life, consumption, social movements and ethnic relations, for example, questions emerge concerning the ways individuals, populations and societies are defined and structured as targets of knowledge, policies, control, or empowerment. Gendered governance is a crucial perspective to the practices of categorization and classification, and it appears important to examine national developments in transnational and historical contexts.

The course consists of two public key notes and workshops in which the teachers and fellow students comment the papers by participating doctoral candidates. Keynote speakers:

Professor Hanne Marlene Dahl (political science, gender studies), Roskilde University, http://rucforsk.ruc.dk/site/person/hmdahl
“Power, care and gendered governance”

Professor Theresa Wobbe, University of Potsdam (history, sociology of gender), https://www.uni-potsdam.de/geschlechtersoziologie/team/prof-dr-theresa-w...
“Work and non-work – the ILO’s labour force concept as a case”

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Feminism and Capitalism, 22–24 September 2015 including Professor Cinzia Arruzza’s public talk: “The Gender of Capital: Women's Oppression and Capital's Reproduction”, 

Feminist theorists today are increasingly returning to the insight that ‘capitalist society’ must constitute the critical frame for understanding contemporary forms of women’s subordination and feminist struggles to overcome it. This renewed interest in the connections between feminism and capitalism raises a host of difficult questions concerning capitalism, socialism as an alternative to it, the challenges feminism presents to both of them, and the challenges they present to it. What is capitalism? Can it be adequately conceived in gender-blind fashion or is capitalism’s social organization inherently androcentric, incapable in principle of instantiating egalitarian forms of gender relation? How do capitalism’s gender asymmetries relate to its other characteristic forms of domination, including class exploitation, imperialist predation, racial/ethnic subjugation, and ecological devastation? What sorts of challenges do such ‘intersections’ pose for feminist struggles in capitalist contexts? Are feminism and socialism natural ‘bedfellows’? Can ‘socialist-feminist’ theories centered on the organization of social labor do justice to gendered asymmetries of sexuality, status, and psyche? Finally, how do these problems appear today? What specific forms do gender asymmetry and feminist struggle assume in societies where capitalism is financialized, globalizing and neoliberal? How might the current conditions require revising classical theories that have sought to clarify the relations between feminism, capitalism, socialism and social transformation?

We invite applications from students whose work is linked to the above topics and themes. In this course the main emphasis is on the individual PhD projects of the participating PhD students. Students will prepare papers for the course, which will be commented on and discussed by the teachers and the other participants. The aim is to help PhD students working on related topics to develop their individual dissertation projects.  

Teachers:
Cinzia Arruzza (Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, The New School for Social Research, USA). Professor Arruzza’s areas of expertise include: Gender and social reproduction, Ancient Metaphysics and political thought, Neoplatonism. Her research projects and publications can be found at http://www.newschool.edu/nssr/faculty.aspx?id=52618
https://nssr.academia.edu/CinziaArruzza/Papers

Johanna Oksala (Academy of Finland Research Fellow, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture and Art Studies, University of Helsinki). Dr. Oksala’s areas of expertise include: Political Philosophy, Contemporary and 20th C European Philosophy, Feminist Philosophy, Foucault, Phenomenology. Her publications can be found at https://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/johanna-oksala(40398368-50d7-440f-9f25-f0706ee01259).html

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ETHNOGRAPHY AND CULTURAL ANALYSIS WITH THE SPECIAL EMPHASIZE ON THE ARTS   September 8 -10, 2015 including Public lecture by Prof. Ellen Koskoff: "What is a Feminist Ethnomusicology? Sharing the Common Theoretical Bedrock”

Target Group: Ph.D. students of ethnomusicology, musicology, art studies, anthropology, cultural studies, folkloristics and music education. SKY PhD students privileged, but the course is also open for other PhD Students from HU and other Finnish universities and international universities.

THE WORKSHOP EXAMINES VARIOUS APPROACHES TO THE CULTURAL STUDY OF THE ARTS (ESPECIALLY MUSIC) IN THEIR HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL CONTEXTS. THE AIM OF THE WORKSHOP IS TO HELP INDIVIDUAL STUDENTS FRAME THEIR RESEARCH QUESTIONS AND ARGUMENTS, USING CURRENT METHODS AND THEORETICAL MODELS DRAWN - IN ADDITION TO GENDER STUDIES - PRIMARILY FROM HISTORICAL MUSICOLOGY, ETHNOMUSICOLOGY, AND ANTHROPOLOGY. SPECIAL EMPHASIS WILL BE ON METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES OF ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELDWORK, ANALYSIS, REPRESENTATION, AND PERFORMATIVITY. (Course schedule below.)

Teachers:
Ellen Koskoff is a professor of ethnomusicology at the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music and director of the ethnomusicology programs there. Her writings about Jewish music, gender and music, and music cognition are widely published. Her work includes Women and Music in Cross-Cultural Perspective (1987), and Music in Lubavitcher Life (2000), winner of the 2002 ASCAP Deems-Taylor award. Her most recent book, A Feminist Ethnomusicology, (University of Illinois Press, 2014) examines a life of research on music and gender. She is a contributor to the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, is the general editor of the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, vol. 3, “The United States and Canada,” and the series editor of the University of Rochester Press’s Eastman/Rochester Studies in Ethnomusicology. She is a former President of the Society for Ethnomusicology and is currently serving as the editor of the Society’s journal, Ethnomusicology.

Pirkko Moisala works as the professor of musicology and ethnomusicology at Helsinki University. Her current project “Deleuzian Music Research” (funded by the Academy of Finland) aims at renewing methods and approaches of music research with the help of the radical process philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and her collaborator Felix Guattari (see http://www.helsinki.fi/deleuzian/). Moisala’s special areas are music anthropology (ethnomusicology) as well as gender and cultural studies of music. Methodologically, her expertise lies in the ethnographic study of musical practices, performance studies, as well as the study of life stories.  Moisala has published widely in gender studies of music, for instance, “Gender and Music” (edited together with B. Diamond), “Gender and Qualitative Methods” (written together with H. Järviluoma and A. Vilkko), as well as “Musiikin toinen sukupuoli” (The Other Sex of Music; biographies of women composers through the ages, written together with R. Valkeila). She has also authored a book on composer Kaija Saariaho.

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Interpreting Feminist Thinkers, 12–13 May 2015 including lecture by Professor Moya Lloyd   "Vulnerability, Grievability, and the Body” 

This PhD course concentrates on the ongoing work of participating PhD students, which will be commented on by the experienced teachers and by the co-students of the course with the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high quality. The expertise of the two teachers is in a wide area of feminist thought and feminist thinkers, both have published on Judith Butler’s work and interpreted several other contemporary feminist thinkers. They are prepared to comment on work which builds on interpreting the texts and thought of various thinkers in intersections within the interdisciplinary area of gender studies and feminist thought and politics. The literature on the course comprises scholarship ranging from history of thought, intellectual history, history of concepts, feminist philosophy, genealogy and deconstruction, and the course focuses on the methodological challenges encountered by those who study feminist thinkers and texts in their doctoral projects.

The Teachers:
Moya Lloyd is Professor of Political Theory at Loughborough University, UK. She has written widely in the area of feminist political theory, particularly on the work of Judith Butler, as well as on questions of identity politics, sexuality, radical democracy, and the body. She is the author of Beyond Identity Politics: feminism, power, and politics (2005) and Judith Butler: from norms to politics (2007), and the editor of the forthcoming volume Butler and Ethics (2015). She is a former Deputy Director of the Centre for the Advancement of Women in Politics at Queen’s University, Belfast. She currently holds a three-year Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship for a project entitled: ‘Who counts? The political problem of the “human”’.

Tuija Pulkkinen is academy professor and professor of Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her work moves in a large area of philosophy, history and politics, and she has published on political thought, democratic theory, conceptual change, genealogy and performativity of gender. Specialist on Judith Butler, Elizabeth Grozs, and Hannah Arendt, she works currently on the politics of philosophy in feminist theory. Her publications include The Postmodern and Political Agency (2000), and the edited volumes The Ashgate Research Companion to The Politics of Democratization in Europe. Concepts and Histories (2008); Hegel’s Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone? and Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen – poliittisen käsitteen historia [From Sittlichkeit to Sexuality – the History of a Political Concept] (2011).

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Re-thinking Public and Private: Gender, Justice, Violence and Violations 28.-29.4.2015 

This SKY course for doctoral students aims to:
Introduce students to the central issues in designing and carrying out gender research at postgraduate level and beyond.
Consider recent debates on gender and feminist research on the concepts of public, private and violence.
Examine what difference it makes to take gender as the subject or object of research.
Of particular concern are the ethical and political issues arising from doing gender research with respect to representing others and seeking to influence and engage with broader social contexts. The course is interdisciplinary, and you will be introduced to a range of perspectives on knowledge production and research practice.

As a result of participating in this course you should be equipped to:
Critically assess existing knowledge practices.
Identify challenges to 'mainstream knowledge' that come from gendered and feminist perspectives.
Explores how knowledge is produced and offers critical assessments of the dominant debates in gendered research practice, asking how we ensure that we conduct research ethically.

Through a discussion on methodological questions, the course provides an opportunity to reflect on and synthesize a range of research design issues. These are addressed on the course through producing and collectively evaluating student designed research proposals and papers.

 Teachers:
Linda McKie is Professor of Sociology at the School of Applied Social Sciences, Durham University, UK. She is also an Associate Director of the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, University of Edinburgh. Linda has published over 120 peer reviewed articles, books and chapters and been a member of the editorial boards for a range of journals including Sociology, Sociology of Health and Illness, and Work, Employment and Society. Linda is passionate in her support for early career colleagues and runs regular writing courses and retreats on planning and writing publications and research proposals. In 2004
she was elected to the UK Academy of Social sciences and was a member of the Sociology Unit of Assessment Panel for the UK Research Assessment Framework in 2014.

Marjut Jyrkinen is Professor in Gender Studies 2012-15 at University of Helsinki (UH). She has her PhD in Management and Organisation studies, Hanken School of Economics, and Docentship in Faculty of Social Sciences, UH. Her current research interests are in the areas of globalisation, violations and violence, intersectionalities and worklife, and research on gender, management and organisations. Marjut is Co-director of the SKY Doctoral Programme.

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How to Study History of Sexuality and Gender, 3-5 November 2014 

This course seeks to explore the current theoretical and methodological challenges when studying the histories of sexuality and gender. How are these histories shaped by different understandings of identity, community and identification? What happens when we approach the past through particular spaces, groups or individuals; through nation states or transnational flows; through literature and the arts; through oral history; through newspapers or court cases; or through material culture? How can queer theory help or hinder our endeavours? 

Some of the key issues and challenges include combining sexuality and intersectional analysis; understanding the shifting nature of sexuality, gender and historical processes; and analyzing the impact of neoliberal governance and changing legislations on sexualities. A special stress will be on combining empirical interview techniques in the historical study on non-conventional sexualities, in queer histories, and in contemporary epistemologies of past intimacies. The course engages with a number of key analytic concepts of sexuality and gender analysis, such as power, institutions, law, policy-making, and explores them through history lenses.

We seek discussions on issues such as:
- What does it mean to take a historical approach to gender and sexuality?
- How can we gain purchase on understandings and cultures of gender and sexuality in the past? Or, for that matter, desires, emotions and subjectivities long gone?
- What sources are available and what are the problems and possibilities associated with them?
- How can we study present configurations through a historical lens?

The aim of the workshop is to advance the high quality of each individual PhD project and the feasibility of the planned timetable for submitting the dissertation. The course offers a deep insight into the theoretical and methodological issues at stake in the study of histories of sexuality and gender.

Teachers:
Dr Matt Cook is Senior Lecturer in History and Gender Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, a Co-director of the Raphael Samuel History Centre, and an editor of History Workshop Journal. He is the author of London and the Culture of Homosexuality, 1885 – 1914 (2003), lead author and editor of A Gay History of Britain (2007), Queer Domesticities (2014), and co-editor of Queer 1950s (2012; with Heike Bauer) and Queer Cities, Queer Cultures (2014; with Jennifer Evans).

Dr Antu Sorainen is Docent in Gender Studies and Academy Research Fellow at the University of Helsinki. Her research project Wills and Inheritance in Sexually Marginalized Groups 2014-2019 looks at how queer people organize their care and support relations, and whether they write wills on the benefit of their “chosen” kin, lovers and friends. Sorainen has published on the history of sexual criminal law and non-heterosexual urban history. She co-authored a book on the conceptual history of Sittlichkeit with Tuija Pulkkinen (Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen, Finnish Literature Society 2011). Her chapter Two cities of Helsinki? One liberally gay and one practically queer? was published in Queer Cities, Queer Cultures, edited by Jennifer Evans and Matt Cook (2014).

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SKY:n kirjoitusseminaari 17.10.–12.12.2014 8 E, sh 223
Eva Korsisaari

Tuntuuko väitöskirjan kirjoittaminen työläältä ja yksinäiseltä puuhalta? Kaipaatko kirjoittamista koskevia avuja ja neuvoja? Tahdotko kirjoittaa rakentavan kritiikin ja rohkaisevan kannustuksen vauhdittamana yhden väitöskirjasi luvun valmiiksi?  SKY:n kirjoitusseminaarin tavoitteena on siivittää osanottajat kirjoittamaan seminaarin aikana yksi tutkimuksensa luku tai alaluku eli noin 35 liuskaa väitöskirjaansa. Tekstit syntyvät vähä vähältä seminaarin aikana – osanottajat kirjoittavat noin 5 liuskaa tekstiä viikossa ja palauttavat katkelmat määräpäivinä verkkoympäristö Moodleen.

Oman kirjoitustehtävän ohella SKY:n kirjoitusseminaarissa on tarkoitus oppia kirjoittamisesta lukemalla ja kommentoimalla muiden seminaariin osallistuvien väitöskirjakatkelmia sekä keskustelemalla yhdessä kirjoittamiseen ja kirjoitukseen liittyvistä kysymyksistä. Seminaarilaisilla on pääsy toistensa teksteihin Moodlessa, ja jokainen sitoutuu lukemaan muiden katkelmat sekä ideoimaan niistä vähintäänkin yhden kriittisen ja yhden kannustavan kommentin. Kommentteja ei kuitenkaan anneta verkossa vaan kasvokkaisissa kohtaamisissa, joiden on tarkoitus tarjota vaihtelua kirjoitustyön yksinäisyyteen. Tapaamisia on viikon välein ja kukin niistä kestää 3 tuntia. Virvokkeet ja eväät ovat sallittuja!

SKY:n kirjoitusseminaari on siis nimenomaan kirjoittamiseen ja kirjoitukseen keskittyvä kurssi, jonka aikana lähestymme aihepiiriä kahdesta eri näkökulmasta. Yhtäältä syvennymme tapaamisissamme kirjoittamisen käytäntöihin kuten itsensä motivoimiseen, kirjoitustyötä mahdollisesti häiritseviin seikkoihin sekä mahdollisimman tehokkaisiin ja antoisiin työskentelytapoihin. Seminaarin vetäjä pitää alustuksen ja tarjoaa mahdollisuuden keskustelutuokioon näistä teemoista jokaisen tapaamiskerran alussa. Ennen kaikkea kurssilla syvennytään kuitenkin kirjoituksen laatuun kuten tutkimustekstin jäsennykseen, ajatuksenjuoksun sujuvuuteen, argumentaation ymmärrettävyyteen, teoriaosuuksien ja analyysiosuuksien toisiinsa suhteuttamiseen sekä tyylin kysymyksiin. Näitä teemoja pohditaan tapaamisissa kommentoitaessa muiden tekstikatkelmia.

Seminaariin mahtuu mukaan 8 väitöskirjaansa kirjoittavaa tohtorikoulutettavaa. Seminaari vie aikaa – joka viikko on tarkoitus kirjoittaa 5 liuskaa tekstiä, perehtyä 7 muun seminaarilaisen samanmittaisiin väitöskirjakatkelmiin sekä olla läsnä kolmen tunnin mittaisissa kasvokkaisissa kohtaamisissa. Kahden kuukauden jälkeen osanottajilla on kuitenkin yksi kokonainen väitöskirjansa luku valmiina, ja toivottavasti niin valmiuksia, inspiraatiota kuin tukijoukkojakin jatkaa väitöskirjansa kirjoittamista valmiiksi saakka.

Seminaarin vetäjänä toimii FT Eva Maria Korsisaari, joka on väitellyt feministisen filosofian ja feministisen kirjallisuudentutkimuksen alalta sekä toiminut aiemmin tutkijatohtorina ja yliopistonlehtorina (ma.) sukupuolentutkimuksen oppiaineen piirissä. 

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Insights and reflections on empirical field work in studying young people, 28th October – 29th includin talk by Prof. Shane Blackman "Doing Ethnography with Young People: from description to theory". 

Organisers: SKY -doctoral programme, YUNET- youth research network, AGORA for the study of Social Justice & Equality in education -research centre

Aim: To offer deep insights into empirical fieldwork experience in studying young people.

To whom: SKY PhD students, other PhD students from the University of Helsinki and other universities who are planning, doing or have done empirical field work as part of their research. The course is thoroughly multidisciplinary and diverse aspects and approaches related to studying young people are welcomed (e.g. youth transitions, youth cultures, gendered approaches, multiculturalism, educational, social scientific, socio-legal or criminological frameworks). Students from varied scientific backgrounds and interests are invited to participate.

Teachers: Professor Shane Blackman, Professor of Cultural Studies Department of Media, Art and Design at Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent, Professor Päivi Honkatukia, University of Tampere (Youth Studies), Professor Kristiina Brunila (Social Justice and Equality in Education, University of Helsinki).

Substance: The course will be organized as a workshop investigating diverse aspects and meanings of the empirical fieldwork in the research process when studying young people. The focus will be in qualitative approaches, and issues such as access to the field, interaction and types of relationships in the field will be discussed, particularly in terms of their effects on the knowledge gained in research. Also questions as to how to move beyond and analytically connect the fieldwork experience to the theoretical frameworks of the study will be discussed.

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Representation 30th September - 1st October 2014 including Beverley Skegg’s public talk “Reacting to Representation” 

Representation is a fundamental concept in contemporary debates in feminist theory and cultural and social theory. It is widely used as an analytical tool in explaining how gendered, sexualised, classed and ethnic identities are constructed. Much of the feminist theorisation
on representation investigates how social groups such as women, ethnic or sexual minorities are (under)represented in different cultural domains (art, media, popular culture, popular rhetoric, economic theory, academic theory etc.), what kind of impact representations
have on these groups, and how dominant representations can be challenged to open up space for recognising the underrepresented groups and to produce a more accurate representation of power relations in contemporary society.

The SKY doctoral course "Representation" is a critical examination of this widely used and contested concept, and how it can be used and challenged in the individual PhD projects. The course focuses on the on-going work of the students and their papers will be commented on by the experienced teachers and by the co-students of the course. The aim of the course is to help the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high quality and within the time-frame they have set to themselves.

The course draws specifically from the ground-breaking work on representation by Beverley Skeggs. Her main theoretical interest is in class: how class features in representations, and how it is discussed in a variety of ways through other concepts such as nation, race,
gender and sexuality.

Teachers:
Beverley Skeggs (Professor in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London, UK). Professor Skeggs is sociologist, whose work includes influential studies on class and value. Her groundbreaking book Formations of Class and Gender: Becoming Respectable (1997) is a longitudinal ethnography of subjectivity which calls for the need to include class in theorisations of gender, identity and power. A continuation of this investigation is Class, Self, Culture (2004), which is a critique of the idea of self and an exploration of the different ways class still circulates as a form of value that is attaches to different bodies. Her more recent research includes a monograph Reacting to Reality TV: Audience, Performance, Value (2012) which investigates how different groups of women respond to television and challenges the conventional notion of reading representations and emphasizes affective reaction. Professor Skeggs is also the joint managing editor of the journal The Sociological Review.  http://www.gold.ac.uk/sociology/staff/skeggs/.

Annamari Vänskä (Collegium Researcher and Adjunct Professor, TIAS - The Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Turku). Vänskä is expert in fashion studies, visual culture, visualised consumer culture, contemporary art, critical gender theory and childhood studies. She is interested in exploring how commercial visual culture, especially advertising, is used in shaping and challenging identities, how clothes and their representations are read, and how images are used in identity construction. Vänskäs latest book Muodikas lapsuus.  Lapset muotikuvissa (Fashionable Childhood. Children in fashion advertising, Gaudeamus 2012; forthcoming as English translation in 2015 via Bloomsbury Publishing) is an investigation of the multitude of ways in which advertising representing children are used for
affecting the consumer-viewers. http://www.annamarivanska.com.

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SKY doctoral course: Gender and Political Analysis (5 ECTS)

University of Helsinki, 16-17 September 2014

Teachers: Johanna Kantola (University of Helsinki) and Emanuela Lombardo (Complutense University, Madrid)

Course description:

How to do gender and political analysis today? This course seeks to unpack the current theoretical and methodological challenges when studying gender and politics. Gender and political analysis has shifted from studying women to gender analyses and, more recently, to analyzing the discursive and material reproduction of gender. Some of the key issues and challenges include combining gender and intersectional analysis; understanding the shifting nature of politics, polity and political processes; and analyzing the impact of neoliberal governance on feminisms. This course engages with a number of key analytic concepts of politics and political analysis, such as power, institutions, polity, policy-making, and explores them through gender+ lenses. We seek discussions on issues such as:

- What does it mean to take a gender+ approach to political analysis?
- How to apply a gender+ approach to analysis of power?
- How to apply a gender+ approach to institutionalism?
- How to study agency?

The course format combines a lecture and PhD student presentations (workshop).

Emanuela Lombardo will give a talk titled 'The symbolic representation of gender' on 16 September 2014 at 14-16. In the workshop, on the 17 September 2014, we concentrate on the ongoing work of participating PhD students. The teachers Emanuela Lombardo and Johanna Kantola comment on student papers and encourage general discussion and debate on the key themes of the course in relation to them. The key aim is to help the PhD students to make high quality progress with their research.

The course is arranged by University of Helsinki Doctoral Programme Gender Culture and Society (SKY). It is open for applications from PhD students of all universities.

Please send applications with a max 150-word abstract of the paper by 29 August 2014 by email to Johanna Kantola (johanna.kantola@helsinki.fi). Deadline for papers (10-12 pages) is 8 September 2014.

The course consists of:

1. Before the course: Delivering a 2-page description (table of contents) of the dissertation project, and paper of 10--12 pages (preferably a part of the dissertation project). Reading of the other PhD students' pre-delivered materials. Deadline for papers: 8 September 2014.

2. Attending Emanuela Lombardo's public talk on Tuesday 16 September 2014, at 14-16.

3. Attending the 1-day workshop on 17 September 2014. Commenting on the projects and papers of other students, and discussing one's own project with the teachers and the co-students.

Teachers:

Emanuela Lombardo is Associate Professor at the Department of Political Science and Administration II of Madrid Complutense University (Spain). Her research concerns gender equality policies, especially in the European Union and Spain, Europeanization, and gender and political representation. On these issues she has published articles in peer reviewed journals as well as chapters in edited volumes. Her last edited book, with Maxime Forest, is The Europeanization of Gender Equality Policies (Palgrave 2012) and her last monograph, authored with Petra Meier, is The Symbolic Representation of Gender (Ashgate 2014). For further information see http://www.ucm.es/info/target/

Johanna Kantola is Academy Research Fellow in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her research focuses on feminist theories of the state, gender and the European Union, representation, gender equality policies, state feminism, and intersectionality. Her books include Gender and the European Union (Palgrave, 2010) and Feminists Theorize the State (Palgrave, 2006). As an editor she has published Changing State Feminism (Palgrave, 2007, with Joyce Outshoorn), The Oxford Handbook on Gender and Politics (Oxford University Press, 2013, with Georgina Waylen, Karen Celis and Laurel Weldon), two edited volumes in Finnish, and a special issue of International Feminist Journal of Politics. She is the Editor of Palgrave Macmillan's Gender and Politics Book Series with Judith Squires. For further information see http://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/fi/person/jekantol

SKY doctoral course: Feminist Thought and Biopolitics (7,5 ECTS)

University of Helsinki, 16--18 June 2014

This PhD course concentrates on the ongoing work of participating PhD students, which will be commented on by the experienced teachers and by the co-students of the course with the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high quality. The expertise of the two teachers is in a large area of feminist thought and politics and they are prepared to comment work on various intersections within the interdisciplinary area of gender studies, and feminist thought and politics. The literature on the course comprises scholarship ranging from feminist philosophy, genealogy, and deconstruction to biopolitics, reproductive biopolitics, necropolitics and thanatopolitics.

The course includes the lecture of Professor *Penelope Deutscher:"That Death Which is Not One: Woman as Exception in Derrida's /The Death Penalty/" *

The course is arranged by University of Helsinki Doctoral Programme Gender Culture and Society (SKY) together with Academy of Finland project Philosophy and Politics in Feminist Theory. It is open for applications from PhD students of all universities. For students abroad, a stipend to cover the accommodation in Helsinki during the course is available.

The Teachers:

Penelope Deutscher is Professor in the Department of Philosophy and an affiliate of the Comparative Literary Studies and Gender and Sexualities programs at Northwestern University. She is the author of /The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Ambiguity, Conversion, Resistance/ (Cambridge U.P, 2008), /How to Read Derrida/ (Granta/Norton 2005), /A Politics of Impossible Difference: The Later Work of Luce Irigaray/ (Cornell U.P., 2002) and /Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy /(Routledge 1997). She co-edited /Repenser le politique: l'apport du féminisme. /(co-edited, with**Françoise Collin, Campagne première/Les Cahiers du Grif, 2004) and /Enigmas: Essays on Sarah Kofman/, co-edited, with Kelly Oliver (Cornell U.P. 1999). In 2000 she was guest editor of a special issue of Hypatia, Contemporary French Women Philosophers. She is the coeditor of a forthcoming volume of essays on Foucault and Derrida with Columbia University Press, and completing work on /Foucault's Children: Biopolitics, Thanatopolitics, and Reproductive Futurism/.

Tuija Pulkkinen is academy professor and professor of Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her work moves in a large area of philosophy, history and politics, and she has published on political thought, democratic theory, conceptual change, genealogy and performativity of gender. Specialist on Derrida and Foucault, on Judith Butler, Elizabeth Grozs, and Hannah Arendt, she works currently on the politics of philosophy in feminist theory. Her publications include /The Postmodern and Political Agency/ (2000), and the edited volumes /The Ashgate Research Companion to The Politics of Democratization in Europe. Concepts and Histories/ (2008); /Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone?/ and /Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen -- poliittisen käsitteen historia [From Sittlichkeit to Sexuality -- the History of a Political Concept] /(2011).

The course consists of:

1. Before the course: Delivering a 2-page description (table of contents) of the dissertation project, and paper of 10--12 pages (preferably a part of the dissertation project). Reading of pre-assigned literature and the other PhD students' pre-delivered materials.

2. Attending Penelope *Deutscher's public talk*: "That Death Which is Not One: Woman as Exception in Derrida's /The Death Penalty/" *16 June 2014, 14--16.* Students of the course are expected to take actively part in the discussion after the lecture.

3. Attending the *2-day workshop on 17--18 June 2014*. Commenting on the projects and papers of other students, and discussing one's own project with the teachers and the co-students.

Applications with a max 150-word abstract of the paper *by 1 June 2014*. Deadline for papers: *9 June 2014*.

Fill in the application and submit your abstract at - [application time has ended]

Feel free to distribute the call. The SKY students will have privileged access to the course but the course is open also for other Helsinki University PhD students and for students of other Finnish universities and universities abroad. Maximum number of students 12.

Third World Feminism and Post-Colonial Theory and Agency (7,5 ECTS)

26-28.5. 2014 University of Helsinki.

Third world feminisms have emerged from many routes to challenge prevailing ethnocentrism in contemporary feminism (Trinh T. Minh-Ha, Chandra Mohanty, Gayatri Spivak). Post-colonial theorists have pointed out the heavy baggage of colonialism that continues in the hierarchical relationship between the West and the Rest in the form of scholarly and other neo-colonialism, neoliberal globalisation and deepening gap between the globally well-off and the poor.

Islamic feminism has emerged to criticize the double victimisation of Muslim women, and to draw out a new platform to interpret the holy texts (Amina Wadud, Kecia Ali, Ziba Mir-Hosseini ). Similar approaches in studies of other religions pave the way to some of the most exciting new scholarship in the entire field. Feminist engagements in law point out the complexity in looking at law as domination and law as social control (Sally Falk Moore 2001).

Conventional dualisms that have patterned earlier feminist scholarship are challenged in post-colonial feminism and replaced by intersectionally informed approaches that open up marginalised, hidden and different agency. Some of the key notions of feminist scholarship such as patriarchy, private vs. public, body and subjectivity are enriched in studies that take fresh looks at fixed dualisms and taken for granted hierarchical relationships.

Significant contribution comes from practical research carried out among men and women in non-Western, transnational and multicultural environments using such methods as ethnographic observation, life course studies and critical discourse analysis. We invite applications from students whose work link to the above topics and themes.

The Teachers:

Nefissa Naguib (Senior Researcher, Chr. Michelsen Institute, Norway; Professor II at the Institute for Social Anthropology at the University of Bergen). Anthropologist whose work links culture and history with politics. Her studies include themes such as culture and the moral economy of food and water; gender and religious minorities; faith-based activism; humanitarianism and military efforts. Her research projects and publications can be accessed http://www.cmi.no/staff/?nefissa-naguib

Susanne Dahlgren (Senior Lecturer, Development Studies, University of Helsinki). Anthropologist interested in legal anthropology, Islamic law, contemporary social movements, politics and revolution, and moralities of faith and religious practice. Her publications can be accessed https://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/susanne-dahlgren%284c6...

Mulki Al-Sharmani (Academy Research Fellow, Comparative Religion, University of Helsinki). With PhD from Johns Hopkins University, her research focuses on Islamic feminism, Muslim family laws and legal activism, and refugees and diasporic communities. Her publications can be accessed https://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/mulki-alsharmani%28751...

In this course the main emphasis in on the individual PhD projects of the participating PhD students. The ongoing work of students will be commented on by the experienced teachers and by the co-students of the course with the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high quality and within the time-frame they have set to themselves.

The course consists of:

1.Before the course: Delivering a 2-page description (table of contents) of the dissertation project, and paper of 10-12 pages (preferably a part of the dissertation project). Reading of pre-assigned literature and the other PhD students' pre-delivered materials.
2.Attending Nefissa Naguib's public talk: "Rule of Numbers: Women and the constitution in Contemporary Egypt", held on 26.5.2014, 14-16. Students of the course are expected to take actively part in the discussion after the lecture.
3. Attending the 2-day workshop on the 27.-28.5. Commenting on the projects and papers of other students, and discussing one's own project with the teachers and the co-students.

Applications with a max. 150 word abstract on the paper by the 14th of May. Deadline for papers: 20th May 2014.

Applications should be sent to: kaisa.pekkala@helsinki.fi

Feel free to distribute the call. The SKY students will have privileged access to the course, though places will be reserved for other Helsinki University PhD students and for students of other Finnish universities and universities abroad, subject to the quality of application.

Maximum number of students is 12.

Feminist Theory and Feminist Politics, 
6-8.5. 2014  SKY doctoral course (7,5 ECTS)

In this course the main emphasis is on the individual PhD projects of the participating PhD students. The ongoing work of students will be commented on by the experienced teachers and by the co-students of the course with the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high quality and within the time-frame they have set to themselves.

The expertise of the teachers is in a large area of feminist scholarship ranging from ethnography, performative political protests, and biopolitics to feminist philosophy, Luce Irigaray’s thought, and Hegel; from regional studies in the the Balkans, and current crisis in Greece to the notions of subjectivity, responsiveness and responsibility.

The course is open to all SKY PhD students. 

The course consists of:

Before the course: Delivering a 2-page description (table of contents) of the dissertation project, and paper of 10-12 pages (preferably a part of the dissertation project). Reading of pre-assigned literature  and other PhD students’ pre-delivered materials.

Attending Athena Athanasiou’s public talk: "Unthinkable Mourning: Counter-Memory and Feminist Political Subjectivity in Post-Yugoslavia." 6.5.2014, 14-16. Students of the course are expected to take actively part in the discussion after the lecture. Abstract of the speach on Gender Studies' homepage >>

Attending the 2-day workshop on the 7-8.5. Commenting on the projects and papers of other students, and discussing one’s own project with the teachers and the co-students. 

The Teachers:

Athena Athanasiou (Ass. Prof. of Anthropology Panteion University, Greece).  Anthropologist, who has published on feminist theory,  technologies of the  body, biopolitics, psychoanalysis, nationalism, postcoloniality, affect, feminist movements, 'Women in Black',  the Balkans, and Greece in crisis.   

Elena Tzelepis (Dr, Centre of Advance Study, Sofia), Specialist on continental philosophy, who has written on contemporary reading s of ancient philosophy, Irigaray and Antigone, the intersections of the political and the psychic, and the workings of critique. 

Tuija Pulkkinen (Academy professor, University of Helsinki, Gender Studies). Has published on political thought, nationalism, democratic theory and conceptual change;  and on genealogy and performativity of gender. Works currently on politics of philosophy within contemporary feminist theory.

Some literature for the background reading:

Butler, Judith, and Athena Athanasiou. Dispossession: The Performative in the Political. Polity, 2013.

Tzelepis, Elena, and Athena Athanasiou, eds. Foreword by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak. Rewriting the Difference. Luce Irigaray and "the Greeks". Albany: State University of New York Press, 2010.

Athanasiou, Athena, and Elena Tzelepis. "Mourning (as) Woman. Event, Catachresis, and "That Other Face of Discourse"." In Rewriting the Difference. Luce Irigaray and "the Greeks", edited by Athena Athanasiou and Elena Tzelepis, 105-34. Albany: SUNY Press, 2010.

Athanasiou, Athena. "Technologies of Humanness, Aporias of Biopolitics, and the Cut Body of Humanity." Differences 14, no. 1 (2003): 125-62.

Athena Athanasiou: “Becoming precarious through regimes of gender, capital, and nation”. Cultural Anthropology. (http://www.culanth.org/fieldsights/250-becoming-precarious-through-regim...)

Application:

Applications  with a max. 150 word abstract on the paper by the 17th of April..  Deadline for papers:  28.April 2014. Applications should be sent to: kaisa.pekkala@helsinki.fi

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SKY START: 1/14 Workshop Meeting (5.-6. June 2014) More information >>

Professor PENELOPE DEUTSCHER (Nortwestern University):
‘That Death Which is Not One: Woman as Exception in Derrida’s The Death Penalty’

Time: Monday 16.6.2014 at 14-16
Venue: Main building, auditorium IX (Unioninkatu 34, University of Helsinki)

In his recently published Death Penalty seminar, Derrida describes death as distributed between the threshold states of termination of heart, brain and breath. He  considers the death penalty in terms of a phantasmatic sovereign decision : the determination of the moment of another's death. But he also revisits a longstanding dialogue with Foucault. As Derrida returns to Discipline and Punish,  as he too considers the perversions of philanthropic, humanist cruelty, as both look back at the same passages  from Beccaria, an encounter takes  shape between Foucault and Derrida's treatments of sovereign power, disciplinary power, souls, cases, sovereign decisions, and biopolitical concerns. So too does an encounter take place between the  images of  nation and progress  given (as Derrida observes) sexualized connotations, and images of the woman (sometimes reproductive)  before the sometimes deadly law of the nation (again, sometimes sexualized).  What kind of provocation to Foucault can we find in Derrida’s renewed interest in Death Penalty in sexual difference, and in the “sex which is not one”  of the "death which is not one."

Penelope Deutscher is Professor in the Department of Philosophy and an affiliate of  the  Comparative Literary Studies and Gender and Sexualities programs at Northwestern University. She is the author of The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Ambiguity, Conversion, Resistance (Cambridge U.P, 2008),  How to Read Derrida (Granta/Norton 2005), A Politics of Impossible Difference: The Later Work of Luce Irigaray (Cornell U.P., 2002) and Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy (Routledge 1997). She co-edited Repenser le  politique: l’apport du féminisme. (co-edited, with Françoise Collin, Campagne première/Les Cahiers du Grif, 2004) and  Enigmas: Essays on Sarah Kofman.,co-edited, with Kelly Oliver ( Cornell U.P. 1999). In 2000 she was guest editor of a special issue of Hypatia, Contemporary French Women Philosophers. She is the coeditor of a forthcoming volume of essays on Foucault and Derrida with Columbia University Press, and completing work on Foucault's Children: Biopolitics, Thanatopolitics, and Reproductive Futurism.

SKY START: 1/14 Workshop Meeting (5.-6. June)

SKY’s first big event, a cluster of workshops on the PhD projects, will be held on the 5.-6. June 2014. The event is organized at the University of Helsinki Main building.

Ideally, all our 50 doctoral students and at least one of each student’s supervisors will be present at the SKY START.

SKY START will begin with a large room discussion, and will go on as small scale workshops where the PhD students’ papers and projects are discussed in detail.

SKY 1/14 will start an annual round of three Workshop Meetings each year, two of which we would like each PhD student to take part.

In the SKY START there will also be an opportunity for a further discussion on the aims of, and wishes for the SKY program.

Please fill in the simple e-form asap, that will help us to organize and plan further the program. https://elomake.helsinki.fi/lomakkeet/50541/lomake.html

For PhD students: For the SKY START you need to send a 1-2 page table of contents paper of your overall project, and a 10-12 pages paper which contributes to your dissertation project. In the workshop you will get in-depth comments on your project and the paper from the members of you workshop team, which includes supervisors and PhD students. Note that you can also bring a paper that you have already presented in another seminar, if you cannot produce a new paper now. This will be a new group to comment on your work, and the same people will go on following your project later. You are also expected to read the papers of the other PhD students of your workshop group, and to give comments on them with a positive attitude of advice as how to advance their completion as high quality dissertations in their own time frame.

For the supervisors: You will be sent the table of contents (1-2 pages) and papers (10-12 pages) of a group of PhD-students before the meeting (the number will not be more than 10 in any case, most likely it will be 4-5). We hope that you have a look at them with your expertise as a supervisor of a PhD projects, and give comments on them in the workshop with the other SKY supervisors and a group of PhD students. This will provide you an opportunity to get to know your Gender Studies research community colleagues work better, and to familiarize yourself with a number of interesting PhD projects, which you will be able to follow in the long run.

Open lunch time seminar

Thursday 6 February 2014 at 12.00-13.00 in Gender Studies seminar room, Topelia, Unioninkatu 38E

Emanuela Lombardo (Madrid, Complutense University, Spain)
 
"Gender mainstreaming and policy responses to the economic crisis: The ‘unintended consequences’ of EU and national policymaking on Spanish gender equality policies"

The economic crisis in Europe represents a challenge for gender equality policies, especially in Southern member states, such as Spain, that experience great economic difficulties and high levels of public debt. This paper argues that European Union (EU) and national policymaking in times of economic crisis, by not mainstreaming gender in their policymaking, have had ‘unintended consequences’ on Spanish gender equality policies. The paper explores the policy reforms that the Spanish government enacted from 2010 onwards, in response to the EU anti-crisis guidelines, and their consequences on gender equality policies. It analyses changes in the Spanish equality machinery, employment and care, and gender violence policies, taking into account the national political context, welfare and gender regimes, and institutionalization of gender equality prior to the crisis.

Emanuela Lombardo,PhD in Politics at the University of Reading (UK), is Lecturer at the Department of Political Science and Administration II of Madrid Complutense University (Spain). She has worked as researcher in different European projects (European Commission FP4, FP5, and FP6, and POM Programs). Her research concerns gender equality policies, particularly in the European Union and Spain, gender mainstreaming, and gender and political representation. On these issues she has published articles in refereed journals and chapters in edited books. Her last book, edited with Maxime Forest, is The Europeanization of Gender Equality Policies (Palgrave 2012). Her forthcoming monograph, authored with Petra Meier, is The Symbolic Representation of Gender (Ashgate). For further information see http://www.ucm.es/info/target/

 

Gender, Culture and Society Doctoral Programme
SKY – Sukupuoli, kulttuuri ja yhteiskunta
Open Seminar

Time: Thursday 9.1.2014 at 13–16
Place: D112 Topelia, Unionikatu 38

Are you working on a PhD thesis from a gender perspective?

If you are, we warmly invite you to join the Gender, Culture and Society (Sukupuoli, kulttuuri ja yhteiskunta - SKY) doctoral program in the new year in order to benefit from its excellent and inspiring multidisciplinary teaching and supervision (for more information see below).

The doctoral program is  hosting an open seminar:
Time: Thursday, 9 January 2014 at 13-16
Place: Topelia (Unioninkatu 38 D, D112, 1st/ground floor).

This seminar is intended to the program's supervisors and to its potential PhD students who want to hear more about it and participate in planning it. You are warmly welcome to join us.

Please let us know by via email whether you are interested in participating in the seminar (johanna.kantola@helsinki.fi).

Programme

13.15-14.15 Introduction to Gender, Culture and Society (SKY) Doctoral Programme
Welcome and introductions – Johanna Kantola, Gender Studies
Introduction to University of Helsinki Doctoral Programmes – Maija Urponen, Faculty of Arts
Introduction to SKY – Tuija Pulkkinen, Gender Studies
Discussion and Questions

14.15 -14.45 Coffee break

14.45-16 Teaching and supervision in SKY
Introduction to the session – Johanna Kantola, Gender Studies
Introduction to teaching, courses and supervision in SKY – Tuija Pulkkinen, Gender Studies
Discussion and feedback

SKY Writing Group is a weekly gathering dedicated to improve and reflect on the writing process of a PhD dissertation as well as to facilitate the participants to write one chapter of their thesis during the period. The writing seminar is currently taught in Finnish.