People

Mikko Tolonen is an assistant professor (tenure track) in digital humanities. His background is in intellectual history and he is the PI of Helsinki Computational History Group. Since 2015 he has been organising the Helsinki Digital Humanities Seminar (#helsinkiDH, link to seminar). He is the subject head of digital humanities and he has designed the DH teaching module at the Faculty of Arts (link: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/helsinki-centre-for-digital-humanities/teaching). His current main research focus is on an integrated study of public discourse and knowledge production that combines metadata from library catalogues as well as full-text libraries of books, newspapers and periodicals in early modern Europe. Tolonen works also in other areas of Enlightenment studies.

Website: https://researchportal.helsinki.fi/en/persons/1f6c4343-d64e-48d5-b6af-39d5f3442502
Twitter: https://twitter.com/mikko_tolonen
email: mikko.tolonen@helsinki.fi

Leo Lahti is a PI/adjunct professor in applied mathematics in University of Turku with background in statistical machine learning and data science. He is one of the founding members of Helsinki Computational History Group and has also several years of international research experience in high-throughput biomedical research. His current focus is on the theory and applications of modern statistical data analysis.

Website: http://www.iki.fi/Leo.Lahti | twitter: https://twitter.com/antagomir | email: leo.lahti@iki.fi

Eetu Mäkelä is a tenure track assistant professor of Human Sciences – Computing Interaction at the University of Helsinki. His interests lie in exploring the challenges complex human data and questions pose for computational algorithms, workflows and tools. These are also the questions he engages with in his work with the computational history group.

Website: http://iki.fi/eetu.makela
twitter: https://twitter.com/jiemakel
Email: eetu.makela@helsinki.fi

Jani Marjanen is a historian and postdoctoral researcher at the University of Helsinki. He specializes in eighteenth and nineteenth-century patriotism, the theory and method of conceptual history, and the development of public discourse. In the Helsinki Computational History Group he works on the analysis of public discourse through quantitative and qualitative analysis of metadata and historical language. He is one of the editors of Contributions to the History of Concepts.

Website: https://researchportal.helsinki.fi/en/persons/bc7769e1-9429-4da6-8ab0-956d655256f5 | twitter: https://twitter.com/janimarjanen | email: jani.marjanen@helsinki.fi

Mark is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Helsinki interested in topics both historical (the emergence of the public sphere in 18th century Europe; Jean-Jacques Rousseau's political thought) and methodological (the intersection between intellectual history and digital humanities). Although a traditional historian by training, Mark is also trained in quantitative approaches to historical research - in particular, statistical approaches to historical records, quantitative text analysis, and social network analysis. Before Helsinki Mark was a Fellow in the Government Department at the London School of Economics and completed his DPhil at the University of Oxford.

Website: https://researchportal.helsinki.fi/en/persons/210b9f46-e9b2-416e-b9a1-95ed19aed4c1 | github: https://github.com/markjhill | email: mark.hill@helsinki.fi

Postdoctoral researcher at the University of Helsinki, member of VARIENG (link) and COMHIS. Research interests: corpus linguistics, digital humanities, historical sociolinguistics, English lexis and morphology. Particularly interested in multidisciplinary collaboration on developing tools and methods for the study of language variation and change in its sociocultural contexts.

Website: http://www.helsinki.fi/varieng/people/varieng_saily.html | twitter: https://twitter.com/TanjaSaily | email: tanja.saily@helsinki.fi

Hi! I am a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Helsinki, where I have joined the COMHIS group. I research semantic change in multilingual, unstructured, OCRed, historical textual data and specialise in topic modelling (LDA) with a special interest on the relation between words and ideas, and how they evolve through time. I'm really interested in meaningful applications of NLP within the digital humanities.

I was a visiting researcher at the Long Room Hub (link) of Trinity College Dublin for three months In 2015, and for two weeks at the Alan Turing Institute (link) in 2017. In 2018 I have returned twice to the Turing, both times for a bit more than a week.

Latest publications on Tuhat, UH's repository: tuhat | Other news, complete list of publications: hengchen.net | twitter: https://twitter.com/_shengche

Antti is doctoral student in Digital Humanities and Finnish Language in University of Helsinki. While a linguist who ventures into computation, he is mostly interested in implications the computational methodologies have on theories of semantics and pragmatics. His dissertation deals with vector space models and distributional semantics.

Ville is a doctoral student in History and Digital Humanities at the University of Helsinki. He is a historian by training but has picked up coding skills on the way and now applies them to both metadata and large text corpora. His dissertation deals with 18th century history of publishing, networks in booktrade and text reuse.

Website: https://researchportal.helsinki.fi/en/persons/c1d72193-e2a1-47bc-a61e-2ec7fedb4156 | email: ville.vaara@helsinki.fi | github: https://github.com/villevaara

Hege Roivainen is a graduate student of language technology and Latin at the University of Helsinki and a research assistant in the Helsinki Computational History Group. His main interests include, but are not limited to, library metadata catalogues and everything touching upon poetry, Latin, OCR or book history.

Iiro Tiihonen is a graduate student of both general history and mathematics at the University of Helsinki and a research assistant at Comhis. His studies have focused on intellectual history, historical sociology, mathematical analysis and laters applications. He’s especially interested about historical research that builds on well articulated theories and about theories that can be evaluated with historical research.

Viivi Lähteenoja is a PhD candidate in philosophy at the University of Helsinki and Aalto University. Her research focuses on the ethics of the digital world and in particular the use and applications of personal data. Combining traditional theories of ethics with the most pressing social issues in the data economy, her work is relevant for philosophers, data scientists, digital humanities, and society at large.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/viivilahteenoja
Email: viivi.lahteenoja@helsinki.fi
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/viivilahteenoja/
Research portal: https://researchportal.helsinki.fi/fi/persons/viivi-l%C3%A4hteenoja/

Harri Lindroos is a doctoral student in history and digital humanities at the University of Helsinki. He is in many ways a very traditional historian working on a thesis concerning the Scottish Enlightenment, but also eager to explore digital methods to support his research. His other scholarly interests include topics such as history of science (natural, moral and social) and history of conservatism.

Email: harri.lindroos@helsinki.fi