In order to complete the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the student must write and publish a doctoral dissertation which is approved by the Faculty after a public examination.

A doctoral dissertation shall consist of peer-reviewed scholarly publications or manuscripts accepted for publication, as well as a summarising report on the said documents (an article-based dissertation); or, a doctoral dissertation shall be a scholarly work in the name of the doctoral candidate alone and based on previously unpublished research results (a monograph). The summarising report of an article-based dissertation shall be a balanced work based on both the publications included in the dissertation and research literature.

The article-based dissertation can also include manuscripts that have been accepted for publication. Manuscripts submitted for publication may be included as long as they do not constitute a significant portion of the dissertation contents. The preliminary examiner must evaluate the significance of such manuscripts to the dissertation contents, and indicate any shortcomings in his or her report.

Co-authored publications may be included if the author’s independent contribution to them can be demonstrated. The doctoral candidate must include in the dissertation a report on his or her contribution to the publications included in the dissertation as well as whether the publications have been used in previous dissertations. The Faculty recommends that this information be provided in the list of publications included in the dissertation.

The University Rector has issued instructions on the scope and structure of dissertations on 20 June 2017. According to these instructions, the maximum recommended length for a monograph shall be 250 pages. At the Faculty of Science, the summarising report of an article-based dissertation is typically no more than 50 pages in scope.

Instructions for licentiate thesis can be found here.