About

Centre of Excellence in Research on Ageing and Care (CoE AgeCare) is one of the 12 Centres of Excellence that the Academy of Finland has chosen for the period 2018-2025

Among other three research groups of CoE AgeCare, the group Migration, Care and Ageing (MICA) aims at developing extensive research on the situation of ageing migrants and of that of migrant care workers from the perspectives of social ties, health and wellbeing, citizenship and migration trajectories in transnational and local contexts.

RG3 is based at the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Helsinki. RG3 integrates, builds on and expands the work carried out within various completed and ongoing research projects that focus on elderly care occupations and the incorporation of migrant-background care workers, the mental health of migrants and migrant womens’ citizenship trajectories as well as on intergenerational relationships, belonging, self and identity. The projects include “The Shaping of Occupational Subjectivities of Migrant Care Workers”, “Using Data Linkage to obtain accurate population estimates of migrants in Northern Ireland and their needs for and use of mental health and social care”, and “Ordering the “Migrant Family””. The aim of RG3 is to develop extensive research on the situation of ageing migrants and of that of migrant care workers from the perspectives of social ties, health and wellbeing, citizenship and migration trajectories in transnational and local contexts.

Subproject 1: CHARM

Background and Rationale

Ageing and migration are important socio-demographic phenomena in Europe. In 2017, 19% of the EU citizens were aged 65 or more and the proportion of older people will increase significantly in the coming decades while the working age population is shrinking (Eurostat 2018). At the same time, the number of older migrants is growing. In 2010-2015, there was significant growth in the number of older foreign-born residents as well as the ‘future older migrants’ (age group 45-54) throughout Europe. For example, in Finland the increase was over 50% (Ciobanu, Fokkema, and Nedelcu 2017). In the context of global population ageing and growing international migration, the issues of health, pension and care organization for older migrants, will become pressing social questions (Bolzman and Vagni 2017).

Immigration to Finland has grown rapidly since the 1990s. In 2016 there were around 373,500 people who did not have Finnish or Swedish as their first language , which is about 6.8% of the population. The largest of these groups is the Russian speakers, who comprise almost 21% (around 77,000 persons) of all migrants (Statistics Finland 2018).

Subproject 2: Ageing immigrancy as a category of recognition and transition

The subproject Ageing immigrancy as a category of recognition and transition studies construction of immigrancy, multiculturalism and equality in the activities and services implemented by the third sector organizations. The subproject focuses on challenges and reformation needs faced by the health and social services due to increasing diversity of the older people regarding Finnish and Swedish language skills, cultural, religious and educational backgrounds, family models, working life histories etc.