Learning outcomes 

Students familiarize with topical scientific literature and theories on CSR from multiple viewpoints. Aim is to be able to assess sustainability strategies and practices and the underlying drivers and performance applied in the context of bioeconomy. Case studies are also used in group works.

Contents 

Familiarization with basic theories and models for corporate responsibility (CR/CSR) and their applications in emerging bioeconomy. Special emphasis is put on forest industry ijn global context. Course includes 10 h lectures and 4 h guest speakers, mid-term literature exam and group work or individual assigments. Fullfillment requires independent teaching and ability to participate at least 50 % of contact teaching and group work sessions.

 

Learning outcomes 

The student learns managerial approaches to economic problems in the forest industry, the student:

  • Is able to analyze the profitability and risks of investment projects
  • Can describe the production function of an industry
  • Knows how firms compute the cost of capital
  • Is able to assess financial statements
  • Is able to perform simple firm valuation
  • Can assess the value of industrial forests

Contents 

Finance and investments in the forest industry.

Learning outcomes 

Students will gain an overview of key concepts and current trends in international forest policy, and the main theories applied (critical policy analysis, network policy analysis, institutional policy analysis, rational policy analysis, and the advocacy coalition framework). They will be able to apply a political economy lens and methods such as institutional, discourse and network analysis to dissect an international forest policy arena (tropical deforestation). Students will be enabled to apply these basic concepts as well as methods and approaches to understanding politics and power in REDD+ (reducing emissions through avoided deforestation and forest degradation).

Contents 

The course will start with an introduction into the field of international forest policy, and theories in forest policy analysis. An introduction to the policy arena of tropical deforestation in the context of climate change is followed by an overview of a theoretical framework to understand the political economy of deforestation, and related methods. REDD+ (reducing emissions through avoided deforestation and forest degradation) is used an example to showcase findings of such an analysis in a comparative design, and how institutional, discourse and network analysis can be applied. This knowledge will then be built upon by the students in group work to analyse REDD+ politics and power in selected countries. The key findings of each group and country case will be presented (as powerpoint and essay) and discussed.

Topics covered:

  • Introduction to International Forest Policy and underlying theories
  • Introduction to the policy arena of tropical deforestation in context of climate change
  • A political economy framework (the 4Is: institutions, interests, ideas and information)
  • Methods and approaches to analyse the 4Is: institutional, discourse and network analysis
  • The case of REDD+

Presentation of students’ group work results (country case study) and submission of essay.

Learning outcomes 

Gaining a comprehensive understanding of the current ecosystem services research.

Contents 

The aim of this course is to provide a systematic overview of the ecosystem service approach, in regard to both theory and applications. Examples and case studies will focus on forest ecosystems and the forest sector.

Learning outcomes

The course is done using problem-based learning. The student will learn to:

  • Understand the basic tree ecophysiological processes and their spatial and temporal dynamics
  • Understand the effects of environment on tree structure and functioning
  • Evaluate quantitatively the effects of environment on tree ecophysiology at leaf, tree and stand scale.
  • Formulate research questions, search literature and analyze data to address the questions.
  • Design and use metadata and data archiving

Contents

The main topics in the course are:

  1. Photosynthesis: light energy capture
  2. Photosynthesis: carbon reactions
  3. Canopy structure and light environment
  4. Tree water relations and transport processes
  5. Links between nutrient uptake and carbon dynamics
  6. Primary and secondary metabolites
  7. Stand scale gas exchange processes
  8. Annual cycle of plant functions, phenological models
  9. Patterns of carbon allocation between canopy, stem and roots

Learning outcomes 

To understand the interactions of forestry and carbon balances of forest ecosystems, other effects of forest management on climate.

Contents 

Carbon balances of the world and of the role of forests, the role of forestry for forest ecosystem carbon balances. Measurement and certification of forest carbon balances.

Learning outcomes 

Student knows and can explain the main concepts, theories and practical approaches of forest ecosystem management. The student is able to analyze the relationships and tradeoffs between different dimensions of sustainability in forest management contexts.

Contents 

History and definitions of sustainability concepts, sustainability and forest policy, ecosystem approach, resilience thinking, managing forests as complex adaptive systems, ecosystem services, cultural sustainability, tactical models of implementation of sustainable forest ecosystem management.

Learning outcomes

After completing the course the students will know how to apply the basic principles, concepts, methodologies and related socio-economic aspects to the rehabilitation and restoration of degraded ecosystems, soil, and surface and ground water.

Contents

The course has a multidisciplinary approach. Concepts and theory of restoration and rehabilitation; mechanisms of ecosystem degradation through inappropriate land-use practices, invasive exotics species, mismanagement, pollution or exploitation for timber and natural resources; species composition, structure, dynamics of degraded forests and land; practical methods of restoration and rehabilitation of degraded tropical, sub-tropical and boreal forest ecosystems and landscapes, including wetlands, agro-forest ecosystems and soils; evaluation of various case studies. There is a compulsory 1-2 day field trip.

Learning outcomes

After completing the course the student will be able to understand and interpret the hydrology and water balance of forest ecosystems. The student will be able to model and construct a water balance for a forest stand and have the tools (models) for doing so. The student will be able to appraise the central role water plays in many processes affecting the functioning of forest ecosystems.

Contents

The course deals with how precipitation interacts with forests and soils. The components of the water balance (rainfall, snowfall, canopy interception, evapotranspiration, snowmelt, soil water storage, soil water movement, drainage/percolation and runoff) are systematically covered from the theoretical, measurement and modelling points of view.

The main emphasis will be at the forest stand scale, but that of the small catchment (watershed) will also be covered. Solar radiation as the driver for evapotranspiration, the effects of tree species and stand structure, soil physical and hydraulic properties, and the hydrology of peatlands are also covered. The last part of the course deals with applied aspects of forest hydrology: the impacts of forest management, land-use change, and climate change on the water balance.

The weekly individual home assignments deal with the calculation and modelling of the water balance components for boreal coniferous forest ecosystems. For the final assignment, students in small groups (2-3) will apply a simple water balance model (WATBAL) and a climate generator model (LocClim) to world locations (chosen by each group) and the results presented in a seminar.

Learning outcomes

  • Appreciation of diverse  areas of  biotechnology process that are relevant in Forestry
  • Understand the historical background on applied and modern biotechnology
  • Develop awareness on how biotechnology can impact on forestry practices in the coming decades
  • Identify key topic areas that might require immediate or long term intervention with biotechnology tools

Contents

  • Biotechnology: history, processes and potentials in Forestry: An overview           
  • Forest trees and their microbial partners: The potentials (Phytoremediation, biopulping etc)
  • Tree Health problems-an overview 
  • Application of DNA/molecular techniques in fungal biodiversity analyses
  • Endophytes in biotechnology
  • Biological control: Principles and applications in tree health protection               
  • Forest tree breeding
  • Fungal Biotechnology: secondary metabolites, lignocellulose bioconversion, first and second generation biofuel
  • Biodegradation and biodeterioration technology
  • Tree biotechnology-GM trees (concept, principles and applications)                                
  • Ethical and environmental implications of GM-trees: Impact of GM trees on Biodiversity, insect resistance, disease resistance, tolerance to environmental stress, sterility of GM trees, environmental release, regulatory framework, environmental and human health benefit of GM trees, Risk aspects of GM trees to human  health and biodiversity
  • Excursions: to Biotechnology company, forest tree breeding station forest tree nursery etc

Learning outcomes

Student will understand the connections among abiotic and biotic disturbance agents and health status of boreal forest ecosystem. He/she can predict the effects of climatic drivers, pests (insects, mammals, pathogens) and other disturbing factors on health, stability, diversity and socioeconomic values of forests. The student knows the modern methodology for disturbance monitoring and the basic principles of mitigation and adaptation of forest ecosystem to different kind of disturbance factors.

Contents

A topic of the course will evolve each year, according to topical questions related to forest health. The main focus of the course covers e.g. storm damages and their wide impact on both ecosystem stability and the whole human society. The course will deal with the issues of primary and secondary insect outbreaks, forest management, survey methodology, yield value and trade, meteorology, legislation, administration by state organizations and authorities, terms of forest insurance etc. The course consists of lectures given by specialists of different disciplines, projects by students, study diary, field excursion, essay, seminar and literature.

Learning outcomes

After attending the course students will understand basic concepts and methods of field research of tropical forests and natural resources and of livelihoods of forest-dependent rural people. The course is aimed primarily at participants of the FOR 249 field course.

Contents

Theoretical background and field methods for:

  • Forest inventory, including biomass and carbon analysis
  • Biodiversity analysis in forested landscapes
  • Livelihoods analysis of farmers and villages
  • Value-chain analysis of timber and non-timber forest products
  • Vulnerability analysis of poor farmers and communities.

Learning outcomes

After completing the course students will learn to identify and explain the major agroforestry systems of the tropics and developing countries. They will also be able to describe the mechanisms of biophysical and socio-economic interactions in agroforestry systems.

Contents

Ecological, technical, economic and social aspects of agroforestry systems and practices in the tropics and developing countries. Overview of participatory approaches in agroforestry, ecophysiological aspects of agroforestry, soil management in agroforestry, agricultural crop production and management in agroforestry, agroforestry and biodiversity, Agroforestry systems and carbon sequestration, modelling of agroforestry systems, policy for the development and promotion of Agroforestry, and linkages to major global environmental conventions (UNFCCC, UNCCD, UNCBD).

FOR-259 GIS and RS in environmental and land use applications, 5 cr 

Learning outcomes

The course concentrates on GIS and Remote Sensing applications of the environmental and land-use sciences. It introduces the students to Environmental and land-use GIS -systems and their applications through research study cases.

Contents

Course consists of 3 Modules (Lectures & Exercises)

1)      GIS and RS in large scale mapping & monitoring applications

2)      GIS based ecological, environmental and land-use analyses

3)      Environmental GIS products & databases

Programs: QGIS and R.

Learning outcomes 

The aim of the course is that the students should be able to model and solve complicated (e.g. multi-objective and/or spatial, discrete/continuous) forest resources management problems using operations research tools.

Contents 

Multi-objective and/or spatial, discrete/continuous problems. Simulation, Markov Chains, linear programming and its extensions (MIP, GP, CP), and heuristic optimization. Decision making under uncertainty using stochastic optimization and the concepts of value of stochastic solution and value of information.

Learning outcomes 

To give an understanding of wood procurement operations. Ability to make analyses of supply chains and to handle different type of tools for planning and decision-making.

Contents 

Wood supply strategy, stocks, harvesting operations - production and planning, transport operation - capacity and costing, transport management, information management. Assignments and project work (case study). Excursion.

Learning outcomes 

After taking the course, students are able to describe how the properties of wood fibres vary, how they can be classified and modified, and how they affect the properties of fibre based products. Furthermore, students have the knowledge how to analyze the suitability of fibre raw material to different products.

Contents 

Variation and measurement of wood fibres, fibre modification and its effect on product properties, manufacturing and use of nanocellusose, wood fibres as raw material for composites, textiles and biorefineries.