Research interests

  • Philosophical psychology
  • Emotions
  • Medieval and renaissance studies
  • Systematic theology
  • Philosophy of religion

Current research

The Salutary Power of Negative Emotions in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Dr. Palmén’s research project explores the accounts of the so called negative emotions in medieval and renaissance sources. The goal of the study is to move beyond the simple positive-negative polarity and explore the complexity of pleasant and painful emotions in the history of philosophical psychology. She will argue that medieval and renaissance theories of emotions recognize also positive dimensions of certain negative emotions and indicate their possible beneficial effects on person’s behavior and cognition.  The study will focus to three different “negative” emotions, namely, fear, shame, and sorrow.

The research aims will be achieved by systematically investigating primary sources of medieval and renaissance writings (e.g., Thomas Aquinas, Dante Alighieri, Coluccio Salutati) and by exploring specific philosophical concepts and the implications of these from those texts. Although emotions have their undeniable biological and physiological bases, the research builds on the assumption that emotions are essentially connected to various historically and culturally grounded systems of shared meanings which may change according to different contexts. The resulting understanding of the cultural modelling of emotions and their changes will facilitate modern discussions of emotions by offering a more nuanced and historically informed view of the affective dimension of human reality.

Research Interests

  • International/diplomatic history of the Baltic states in the 20th century
  • Propaganda and military history

Current Research

The New European Order and the Baltic Litmus Test:  Existential fears, ideas on security and Estonian-Russian relations in the 1990s

At the turn of the 1990s, when a new European order was being re-negotiated at the end of the Cold War, the Baltic republics and Russia were partners seeking international recognition and engaged in a power struggle in the Soviet endgame. The BalticRussian alliance was cemented by Yeltsins intervention to stall Soviet aggression in January 1991 and crowned by Russias recognition of the Baltic independence immediately after the failed coup détat in August 1991. However, soon after the dissolution of the USSR relations between the newly independent Baltic states and Russia began to deteriorate. Tallinn, Riga and Vilnius abandoned their previously declared policy of neutrality and announced their intention to integrate into Western security organizations as soon as possible, whereas Moscows earlier quest to join a Common European Home looked increasingly in doubt, as domestic support for liberal foreign policy vanished and Russia began to assert its interests in the "near abroad". This research focuses on the failure, despite the initial promising start, to establish a constructive EstonianRussian dialogue, placing it in the context of the construction of the New European Order in the Baltic region.

Short Bio

Kaarel Piirimäe is associate professor in contemporary history at the University of Tartu and senior research fellow at the Estonian War Museum. In 2005 he graduated from the University of Tartu (MA in history) and holds a PhD in history from the University of Cambridge (2009). He is the author of "Roosevelt, Churchill and the Baltic Question: Allied Relations during the Second World War" (Palgrave, 2014), and editor of "Baltic Independence in the twentieth century" (2017, with Louis Clerc and Pertti Grönholm), "The Second World War and the Baltic States" (Peter Lang, 2014, with James S. Corum and Olaf Mertelsmann), "The Baltic Sea Region and the Cold War" (Peter Lang, 2012, with Olaf Mertelsmann) and "The Baltic States and the End of The Cold War (Peter Lang, 2018, with Olaf Mertelsmann)

Research interests

  • Urban cultural history Latin America
  • Violence and Insecurity Central America
  • Sustainable Tourism Central America
  • Contemporary Urban Latin America

Current research

Minervas, modernization, and the transformation of Guatemala City (1870-1930)

The objective of this research is to analyze the first period of modern urban growth in the biggest Central American capital: Guatemala City. The process of modernization will be studied through the new urbanism, changes in the public space, hygienic policies, the construction of modern services and technology and the new social segregation. As part of the urban and cultural change, the work will examine the representations built around the "modern" city, especially through photography and travelogues by European and North American travelers. In theoretical terms, the research analyses space as the main subject. The production and social construction of space are the theoretical starting points of this research. By choosing micro history, as methodological approach, the research aims to show how individual cases can serve to reveal more general phenomena (modernization-modernity) and how the peculiarities reveal codes, forces and processes that shape cultural forms. The relationship between the city, space, and their representation constitute a rich analytical theoretical framework for understanding urban-architectural and socio-political processes – how cities are conceptualized in the ethos of modernity and modernization.

Short bio

Florencia Quesada Avendaño has been trained as a historian in Costa Rica, the United States, France and Finland. Her interests are related to urban issues in Latin America from a historical and more contemporary perspectives and they include the study of urban cultural history, sustainable tourism, urban segregation, inequalities, urban violence and environmental risks. Currently, her research focuses on Guatemala City, first on a historical analysis of the urban and cultural transformation of the capital between 1880 and 1930. Guatemala City is also the subject of another project that she is involved in that looks at fragile cities of the global South, specifically the impact of violence and environmental risks on precarious settlements.

Research interests

  • Philosophy of science

Current research

Virtual Ecology, Artificial Data

Virtual ecology is emerging as a new computer-assisted method for producing easily reproducible and high-quality data. The aim of virtual ecology is to have data sets at disposal which are accurately and comprehensively known by ecologists. Virtual ecology not only provides us with data sets, but also and importantly generates new, albeit artificial, virtual data sets (by computer simulations models) to be utilized by ecologists in various research contexts. Virtual data is systematically and accurately reproducible and controllable for confounding factors and errors, in contrast to natural data. Virtual data can potentially be used as an evidential substitute data for the unreliable, insufficient, and inaccurate natural data. The data produced by virtual ecological simulations is used in evaluating and testing models, methods, and instruments.  The project has four objectives. 1) To analyze philosophical topics related virtual ecology. Virtual ecology involves methodological, epistemological, and evidential issues, which are analyzable through the resources of philosophy of science. 2) To produce virtual data, partly in collaboration with scientists. 3) To analyze methodological and epistemic strength and weaknesses of individual-based models (IBMs). Many virtual ecological simulations are based on IBMs. 4) To have an impact on how virtual ecology is practiced and how its methods develop.

Short bio

A regular philosopher of science who is trying to understand the ways science works.

Research interests

  • Medical anthropology
  • Biomedicine & biotechnologies
  • Rare diseases
  • (bio)ethics & anthropology of morality

Current research

Food, Biomedical Technologies, and Care. The Case of Rare Metabolic Disorders

The proposed project is situated at the intersection of social and medical anthropology, food studies, and bioethics. Drawing from ongoing ethnographic research in Poland and Finland, it aims at (1) analyzing issues that encompass the consumption of food, new biomedical technologies, and practices of care in the lived experience of patients with rare metabolic disorders, specifically LCHAD deficiency, their families, patient advocacy organizations, and doctors, and (2) writing up the results of this study in a book monograph tentatively titled Food, Biomedical Technologies, and Care. The Case of Rare Metabolic Disorders. In particular, it examines how the necessity to frequently eat (a limited range of) foodstuffs while simultaneously people with metabolic disorders, such as LCHAD deficiency cannot or would not eat and thus rely on feeding tubes illuminates not only the ways in which food and biomedical technologies are intertwined, but also alters our understanding of eating as a natural process. In doing so, this project goes beyond commonly examined associations such as care and the elderly, food and obesity, and finally biomedical technologies and life/death. Moreover, by focusing on the Baltic region, it will contribute to a slowly growing literature on rare diseases by providing the first anthropological insight into rare metabolic disorders in this region.

Short bio

Małgorzata Rajtar, PhD, is currently an Associate Professor in the Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences. She carries out medical anthropology research with a special focus on biomedicine; medicine and religion; rare diseases; bioidentity, and ethics. She is the PI of two research grants on rare disorders in the Baltic Sea region funded by the National Science Center in Poland. She is one of the main researchers in a grant on Turner Syndrome (PI: dr hab. Magdalena Radkowska-Walkowicz, University of Warsaw). Her articles were published in "Social Science & Medicine", "Anthropology & Medicine", and "Bioethics" among others.

Research interests

  • Soviet and Communist history 
  • International Relations
  • Philosophy of History

Current research

Stalin's Peacemakers: a Transnational History of the World Peace Council, 1948-1968

My project explores the history of the postwar communist peace movement.  From its inception at the 1948 Wroclaw Congress of Intellectuals for Peace, the movement grew into a global network of national and local peace activists. WPC congresses attracted thousands of delegates and were supported by a dazzling array of scientists, artists and intellectuals. Its anti-nuclear petitions were signed by hundreds of millions of people and by the mid-1950s WPC policies on peace, disarmament and security had widespread support across Europe and the globe.  As a transnational movement with branches in different countries the WPC sought to influence national debates and policies but also to create and shape an international public opinion. Its national committees shared a common identity and waged joint campaigns across the world. The WPC facilitated horizontal as well as vertical networking of peace activists and prided itself on its internationalism and transnationalism. It held its multilingual meetings in different countries, not just in Europe but in Africa, Asia and Latin America, and aspired to create organic networks of peace activists as part of an embryonic global civil society.

Short bio

A recognised world authority on Stalin, the Second World War, and the history of Soviet military and foreign policy, Professor Geoffrey Roberts has published 30 books and some 70 journal articles and book chapters. His work has been translated into 16 languages: Chinese, Czech, Dutch, Estonian, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Persian, Portuguese, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Swedish, and Turkish.  A  Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and a member of the Royal Irish Academy, Professor Roberts has been awarded fellowships by Harvard, Princeton, the Nobel Peace Institute, the Kennan Institute for Advanced Studies University and Institute for Advanced Studies at the Central European University in Budapest.  His biography Stalins General: The Life of Georgy Zhukov (Random House 2012) is a winner of the Society for Military History's Distinguished Book Award.

Research interests

  • Transmediality
  • Narratology
  • Digital media
  • Networked culture
  • Speculative fiction

Current research

Convergent Worlds in the Digital Age. New Forms of Participation and Sharing in Transmedial Environments

The rapid growth of digital media has transformed the ways we approach art and entertainment. Both forms of media and audiences are converging. As a result, not only is content transferred across media platforms, but the new, transmedial environments focus on the sharing of information and affective experiences between users. We urgently need multidisciplinary methodology to explore the effect of a more participatory, networked culture on the ways art and entertainment are authored and used today. This project, which combines narratology with research on games, digital media, and fan cultures, provides an innovative way to analyse both the poetics and the collaborative aspects of new creative practices. This project asks: What exactly is being communicated or shared across multiple forms or media? How does the sharing of information and experiences between users affect the work of designers? What is the role of narrative in art after the digital turn?

Short Bio

I am a researcher interested in all things speculative in art and entertainment. My expertise lies in the thorough understanding of contemporary narrative theory, game and digital media studies, and research on modern fan cultures. So far, my work has engaged with the role of narrative in complex environments that integrate more than one medium, narrative’s relationship to other forms of meaning-making, and the ways in which users engage with art and entertainment. From the autumn 2018 onwards, I also participate in the “Instrumental Narratives: The Limits of Storytelling and New Story-Critical Narrative Theory” consortium funded by Academy of Finland.

Reaserch interests

  • Research Ethics 
  • Philosophy of Science and Social Science
  • Social Epistemology

Current research

The Epistemic Power of Diversity

My research project contributes to the multidisciplinary study of diversity by examining the role of diversity in the production of knowledge. My goal is to understand the potential epistemic benefits and costs stemming from greater diversity. I approach diversity from the perspective of philosophy of science, and especially social epistemology understood as a normative study of the social dimensions of scientific knowledge and practice. An epistemic assessment of diversity is needed to understand the roles that diversity can play in the social practices whereby knowledge is justified and evaluated epistemically, the nature of the epistemic advantages that can accrue to diverse scientific communities, and the background conditions under which diversity can be expected to have epistemically valuable consequences. The project is interdisciplinary in terms of its methods. A philosophical analysis of concepts (e.g., social and cognitive diversity, epistemic benefits and costs) is combined with a case study approach drawn from the social sciences.

Short bio

Kristina Rolin is University Lecturer in Research Ethics at the University of Tampere and a member of the TINT Centre in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences at the University of Helsinki. Her main research area is philosophy of science with an emphasis on research ethics, social epistemology and feminist epistemology. She has published 20 articles in international peer-reviewed scientific journals, 7 book chapters in international peer-reviewed scientific edited volumes, and many other scientific papers.

Research Interests

  • body theory
  • visceral prostheses
  • posthumanism

Current Research

The meaning and significance of prostheses: microchimerism and the posthuman future of embodiment

My project is rooted in the wider meaning and significance of prostheses read through the diverse phenomena of disability, organ transplantation, and microchimerism. (In biomedicine microchimerism refers to a small but significant presence of non-self-cells coexisting within a dominant population of self-cells in the same body.) I will examine the complex interfaces between these 3 areas asking how our understanding of embodiment is being transformed in the age of advanced biotechnologies. Where conventional conceptions of prostheses refer to devices that replace impaired parts of the body for rehabilitation purposes, I seek to broaden the scope to include both mechanical and organic prostheses, including any non-self cellular material within the body. Although some initial work is underway that makes links between these fields, the conjunctions are generally unexplored, and the incidence and prevalence of microchimerism has been slow to gain recognition (Martin 2010). Above all, the project rejects the notion of the singular embodied self. The wider aim is to propose new understandings of the limits and possible extensions of human embodiment that encompass cutting edge interdisciplinary research in critical disability studies, transplantation studies, and in biomedicine.

Short Bio

Margrit Shildrick is Guest Professor of Gender and Knowledge Production at Stockholm University, Adjunct Professor of Critical Disability Studies at York University, Toronto, and Visiting Professor of Law at University of Technology Sydney. Her research covers postmodern feminist and cultural theory, bioethics, critical disability studies and body theory. Books include Leaky Bodies and Boundaries: Feminism, (Bio)ethics and Postmodernism (1997), Embodying the Monster: Encounters with the Vulnerable Self (2002) and Dangerous Discourses of Disability, Sexuality and Subjectivity (2009), as well as edited collections and many journal articles. Most recently, she has been addressing the socio-political and embodied conjunction of microchimerism, immunology and corporeal anomaly.

Research interests

  • Sociology of science and technology
  • Utilisation of genomic knowledge and health data
  • Healthy citizenship
  • Policy analysis

Current research

Moral (de)contextualisation of health data use

The research stems from the government plans to create a Finnish health data economy that is the most competitive in the world. Great emphasis is put on large data collections to generate economic growth, to enhance medical research, and to boost peoples health in new ways. New data driven practices create vast amount of data about individuals and enable data use across organisational and geographic boundaries. Problems related to uses of health data  have often been analysed as questions of privacy. This research alters the focus from the individualistic notion of protection of privacy to acceptance, benefits and moral justifications of health data use. Elaborating on literature in sociology, science and technology studies, philosophy, law and communication studies, I develop theory on moral contextualisation of health data use. It refers to the moral judgements, values and norms that are specific to each context doctors appointment, medical research, welfare benefit decisions, personalised drug marketing. The contexts are not stable, but ambiguous and challenged, and different actors can have varying understandings of the moral contexts. I compare citizen and policy perspectives to health data use.

Short bio

My research areas is sociology of science and technology. During the last decade I have done research on social aspects on biobanks, genomic knowledge and health data use. I have analysed public opinion, health and innovation policies, utilisation of genome data in health care, and governance and establishment of biobanks and health data infrastructures in Finland. I am interested in how new technologies and data analysis transform health care and the relationship between the state and its citizens.

Research interests

  • Folklore Studies
  • Linguistic Anthropology
  • Ethnology

Current research

The Creation of Continuing Bonds by Karelian Immigrants and Their Descendants in Finland

This project investigates the practices, behaviours and beliefs of Karelian immigrants and their descendants in Finland that create bonds with their lost homeland, culture and kin. It sets out to develop an understanding of immigrants losses and their responses to them. Karelians present an exceptionally rich case because it is possible to examine three major waves of immigration to Finland under different historical circumstances across the past century. The arriving population of each wave or their descendants also appear to employ different major strategies for creating and maintaining continuing bonds with their heritage and families. This project will make a vital contribution to the increasingly volatile discussion about immigration that is ongoing in Finland and in the Western world more generally. The central aim of this study is to provide knowledge about the tensions and identities of immigrants and the social strategies that they use to establish and maintain connections to the past, to places, and to their ancestors. 

Research interests

  • Old Norse Language & Literature
  • Old English Language & Literature
  • Comparative & Historical Linguistics
  • Germanic Philology

Current research

The Birth of Poetic Language. Syntax & Meter through the Ages and between Cultures in Medieval Scandinavia and England: a New Digital Humanities Research Tool

Dr Sverdlov studies the survival of a key corpus of Old Norse texts, skaldic poetry, flourishing in Medieval North ca.900-1400, from linguistic, social, and poetic points of view. Skaldic poetry is a unique oral tradition that revels in linguistic acrobatics; more surprisingly, it survives as quotes in prose texts: family and kings' sagas. Dr Sverdlov's research is in the contrast of speech registers and syntaxes between skaldic poetry and saga prose. The former is seen as so complex, only professional poets, skalds, had the skills to compose and understand it. If so, it should have become garbled after centuries of transmission by untrained native speakers inside simple saga prose; yet skaldic texts remain uncorrupted.

This means that Old Norse speech registers were transparent and that non-skalds could parse skaldic syntax. Dr Sverdlov aims to uncover the nature of these parsing skills, and then to apply the Old Norse results to Old & Middle English alliterative poetries, skaldic poetry's contemporaries that feature lines that uncannily resemble those of skaldic metre dróttkvætt in order to determine the comparative history of these literary traditions and further contribute to typological & historical syntax of languages of Baltic/North Sea region.

Research interests

  • Rhetoric
  • Political theology
  • Pastoral power
  • Lutheranism
  • History politics
  • Kenneth Burke, Michel Foucault, Giorgio Agamben

Current research

The Rhetorical Politics of Lutheran Pastoral Power, the case of Finland 1945–2014

The purpose of Jouni Tilli's research project is to analyze the politicality of the Lutheran church and its pastors by taking the three following paths. First, he examines Lutheran priesthood as rhetorical guidance that differs from the Catholic one, based on confession. Second, analyzes how Lutheran theology was related to the three spheres of politia, oeconomia and ecclesia in Finland within a period of 70 years. Third, supplementing the existing Foucauldian and Agambenian research on power according to which Christian pastoral power is the precursor to contemporary forms of power, Tilli will use his interpretation of Lutheranism to shed new light on understanding of power as conduct of self-conduct.

Accordingly, while agreeing that Christian pastoral power is the precursor to modern forms of power and that a fusion of economy and theology underlies contemporary politics, the hypothesis is that rhetorical understanding of pastoral power is vital to understanding how power relations and subjectivities are being forged today, namely through omnipresence of economy-dominated, symbolically-articulated truths beckoning us to conduct ourselves towards "salvation". Thus present forms and practices of power can be understood better in terms of Lutheran pastoral power than the Catholic one.

Short bio

As a political scientist, I have three areas of focus. First, my ambition is to explore the rhetorical aspects of fields and phenomena often deemed somehow unrhetorical. Recently I have focused on theology, economy and immigration. My second interest pertains to the relationship between religion and nationalism in Protestant contexts. Thirdly, I am interested in the political use(s) of the past. My dissertation (2012) received the Best Dissertation Award (Uni. of Jyväskylä) and my monograph “Suomen pyhä sota” won the Finnish Christian Book of the Year Award (2014). In 2017, I was given the Emerging Scholar Award by the Kenneth Burke Society (US).

Research interests 

  • Teaching and learning
  • School pedagogy
  • Intelligence
  • Moral education

Current research

Changing Mindsets about Learning: Connecting Psychological, Educational and Neuroscientific Evidence (CoPErNicus)

In this research project we examine students', teachers' and parents' mindsets about learning. Our research project is motivated by the impact mindsets have been shown to have on students' school achievement. According to Carol Dweck, mindsets are individuals' beliefs about their most basic qualities, such as intelligence and abilities. People with a growth mindset believe that basic qualities are malleable. By contrast, people with a fixed mindset believe that basic qualities are static and unalterable. A fixed mindset inhibits individuals fIrom reaching their fullest potential by creating a fear of failure, and avoidance of challenges. Instead, growth mindset enhances students' academic resilience and achievements. In this project our aim is to collect psychological, educational, and neuro-scientific evidences on influences of mindset on learning. The ultimate goal is to synthesize and construct a research based pedagogical mindset program that could be used to create growth-oriented learning environments in schools.The empirical part of the research is a mixed method longitudinal study in three schools in Helsinki. At the beginning of the study, the participants will be 1st to 3rd-grade students (N=500), their teachers (N=27) and parents (N=750). Our project has national relevance to Finnish society as well as global value to other educational systems by demonstrating with a long-term research design how to increase understanding of the role of mindsets in learning.

Short Bio

Dr. Kirsi Tirri is a Full Professor of Education and a Research Director at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies and the Department of Education at the University of Helsinki. She is also a Visiting Professor at St. John’s University, New York, USA. Tirri has been the President of ECHA (European Council for High Ability) for the years 2008-2012, the President of the SIG International Studies at AERA (American Educational Research Association) for the years 2010-2013 and the President of the Finnish Academy of Science and Letters for the years 2016-2017. Her research interests include school pedagogy, moral and religious education, talent development and gifted education, teacher education and cross-cultural studies. She has published 12 monographs and numerous journal articles related to these fields. She serves in 13 Editorial Boards of educational journals. She leads the school pedagogy research group at the Faculty of Educational Sciences. She has led the Finnish team in many national and international research projects.

Research interests

  • History of humanitarianism
  • History and theory of the humanities
  • Intellectual and cultural history

Current research

Saving Lives from Shipwreck on the Shores of Modern Europe

Henning Trüper's project investigates the history of the organized saving of lives from coastal shipwreck in modern Europe. Since the 1820s, a set of interconnected social movements emerged, in particular in western and northern Europe, which installed nationwide, and in some cases also colonial, systems of lifeboat stations. Within a few decades urban-bourgeois donor and activist milieus persuaded coastal populations to embrace an unconditional imperative to attempt the rescue of the shipwrecked almost regardless of risk. An early case of "humanitarianism," pioneering in its secularity, its focus on the rescue of bare lives, its unparalleled readiness to risk rescuers' lives, and its reliance on lower class volunteers, the lifeboat movement provides privileged access to the historicity of moral norms and humanist universalism in the 19th century. Tied to an older symbolism of the appreciation of impassive spectatorship, a theatrical framing of the "scene" of shipwreck, and a moral economy of exploiting wreckage, the movement radically asserted its modernity while relying on, and only partially negating, a complex set of premodern meanings. The historical semantics of "rescue" were adrift as the modern and the premodern remained entangled. This raises the question of whether the (frequently assumed) unity of "humanitarian sentiment" as an epoch-making constituent of European modernity is problematic, even illusory.

Short bio

PhD in History and Civilization at European University Institute (Florence), 2008. Post-doc University of Zurich Research Priority Program Asia and Europe 2009-11; M4Human Marie Curie Fellow at Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, 2012-5; Member, School of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study Princeton, 2013-4; Lecturer and adjunct lecture, Technische Universität Berlin, History of Science, 2014-6. University Researcher, Core Fellow HCAS since 2016. Habilitation in Modern History, University of Zurich, 2018. I work mostly on 19th and 20th-century European cultural and intellectual history, history of the humanities (historical writing, philology, orientalism), historical theory, and the history of lifesaving and humanitarianism.

Research interests

  • American literature
  • Anthropology
  • Gift theory
  • Economic criticism
  • Nineteenth-century literature and culture

Current research

Gifts, Gift Economies, and Nineteenth-Century American Literature in Anthropological Perspective

The project aims at exploring the function and the role of gift-giving in modern societies, using nineteenth-century American literature and culture as a case study. It intends to refine, question, and deepen our understanding of the interface between market and non-market economies in modern history. Does personal gift exchange challenge or complement more impersonal, market-driven relations? How do notions of pure, perfect, and gratuitous gift determine/shape contemporary gift-giving practices and rituals? If gifts are believed to be/promoted as ideal alternatives to commodities, why is there so much anxiety and controversy concerning gift-giving as revealed in the images of toxic, poisonous, onerous, and violent gifts in contemporary intellectual debates, literature, and art? Covering a wide range of literary works and incorporating varied cultural material such as journals, gift books, correspondence, the study seeks to elicit dynamic interconnection among aesthetic, social, and anthropological aspects of the nineteenth-century American literary culture as well as to examine the points of convergence between literary studies and anthropology. Methodologically, the project relies on gift theory, especially on the works that study gift economy under the conditions of capitalism; it also draws on economic criticism and widely borrows from material culture history, gender studies, Afro-American studies, and book history.

Short bio

Alexandra Urakova holds a PhD in American literature (Moscow State University). She is a Senior Researcher at the A.M. Gorky Institute of World Literature of the Russian Academy of Sciences. She taught at the Russian State University for the Humanities and at the National Research University Higher School of Economics. She held a number of international research positions including Fulbright scholar (University of Virginia), Eccles Fellow in North American Studies (British Library) and Senior Research Fellow at IAS CEU in Budapest. She is the author of a monograph, editor/co-editor of four collections, and the author of numerous essays in American literature.

Research interests

  • Classical and Hellenic logic
  • Grammar
  • Linguistics and science (esp. Medicine)
  • Pauline pneumatology and biblical mss
  • Patristic Philosophy of the 3rd - 5th cent. 

Current research

Physiology of the Human Cognition in the Scientific, Theological and Monastic Contexts of Late Antiquity

The general aim of my project is to investigate the development of Christian cognition-related conceptions in Late Antiquity. Thus, I will focus on such notions as the body-soul relationship, sense-perception and imagination, the faculties of sight, feeling, taste, hearing, smell, memory and intellect, thought and expression, the rational and irrational parts of soul, the nutritive faculty, the pulses and respiration, the free will and destiny. I will use the treatise On the Nature of Man (De Natura Hominis, DNH), written by Nemesius of Emesa between 5th and 6th centuries, as a case study for my project. The treatise exemplifies a complex Christian-scientific anthropology and coins the earliest evidence for a full-fledged physiological approach to human mind, morality, consciousness, and free will. Nemesius' both scientific and theological anthropology influenced the development of Christian monastic practices and played a significant role in the theological and philosophical discussions of its time.

Short bio

Hey, I'm Anna Usacheva, PhD in classical philology (2011, Moscow State University). From the time of my doctoral studies and onwards I've been working on the issues concerning classical and Hellenic philosophy (Plato, Isocrates) and Christian literature of the third and fourth centuries AD. Three years after the defence I spent teaching courses in Patristics and ancient languages at Moscow Universities. In 2015 as a Marie-Curie fellow I moved to Denmark and joined an excellent team of scholars at Aarhus University. My research project resulted in a monograph "Knowledge, Language and Intellection from Origen to Gregory Nazianzen. A Selective Survey", published by Peter Lang in 2017. Then due to a scholarship of Queen Ingrid of Denmark, I had an amazing opportunity to work on the manuscripts of the commentators of Gregory Nazianzen in the Vatican Library.

Research interests

  • Ancient Judaism
  • Early biblical interpretation
  • Wisdom, virtue and character formation
  • Cultural interaction in Mediterranean antiquity

Current research

Ancestral Virtue in Early Jewish Literature

This project analyses conceptions of virtue i.e. human activity regarded as morally valuable and thus desirable in early Jewish literature from the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (ca. 300 BCE - 100 CE). It specifically examines how Jewish authors constructed moral models in their contemporary settings through attributing virtues and vices retrospectively to (anti-)exemplary biblical figures. The variety of early Jewish thought is analysed beyond later canonical boundaries, and the selected sources deconstruct boundaries between sub-areas of research as they include both Judaean and diaspora texts written in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek. More broadly, this project shakes the stereotypical scholarly view that the world from which virtue originates is non-Jewish. Scholars working on virtue ethics in the context of Mediterranean antiquity have typically focused on Greek philosophical sources before moving on to the Christian thinkers of late antiquity and beyond. Ancient Jewish writings must be included in the analysis, however, if the cultural and intellectual pluriformity of Mediterranean virtue discourses is taken seriously. Due to its cross-disciplinary nature, the project has connections to religious studies concerned with human morality, Graeco-Roman studies, and early Christian studies.

Short bio

Dr. Elisa Uusimäki is a scholar of ancient Jewish literature and holds the title of docent at the University of Helsinki, currently serving as the PI of the research project "Conceptions of Virtue in Early Judaism" (2018-2020). Uusimäki has published on wisdom and torah, ancient scriptural interpretation, the figure of the sage, and exemplarity. Apart from Helsinki, she has worked at the University of Manchester, Yale University, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and Rijksuniversiteit Groningen.

Research interests

  • Perception
  • Motor processes
  • Speech

Current research

Grounding of prosody on motor processes

The theories of embodied cognition assume that decoding phonetic and prosodic features of speech should be engaged to motor processes. Indeed, it has been shown that motor processes contribute to decoding phonetic features of speech. Although, it has been shown that, for example, the intonation peak co-occurs in synchrony with gestural hand, head and eyebrow movements, the role of motor processes in decoding prosodic features of speech is a topic that is mostly unexplored. Moreover, it is known that linguistic prosody consists of structures that include melodic variations in pitch, loudness and timing leading to, for example, specific intonation emphasizing whether someone is asking a question (rising pitch). In contrast, emotional prosody is used to communicate the emotional state of the speaker (e.g., anger). The present project explores whether motor processes related to, for example, head, eyebrow and hand movements are involved in processing emotional and/or linguistic prosodic features of heard speech. The studies use, for example, electromyography and different behavioral techniques (e.g., grip force) in order to investigate whether heard prosodic cues systematically modulate motor activation related to specific face, neck and hand muscles.

Short bio

Lari Vainio has worked as a lecturer of cognitive psychology in University of Helsinki since 2010. In addition, he has investigated perceptual, motor and cognitive processes in domestic and international research environments for many years.

Research interests

  • Maritime archaeology
  • Nautical technology
  • Nautical ethnography
  • Behavioral ecology
  • Evolutionary biology
  • Fishing communities
  • Fluvial communities
  • Human-environment interactions

Current research 

Human-environment interactions: nomadic fishing communities and state development in the Lower Mekong Basin

Since the discovery of the Angkor civilization on the shorelines of the Tonle Sap Lake, it has been assumed that rivers played an important role in the establishment of this polity. However, rivers have largely been ignored in previous academic research, which has seen stronger focus on land remains. This has resulted in a biased interpretation of the data, favouring approaches that recognise Angkor as an agrarian state. While the role of agriculture is certainly of great importance, novel research conducted during my doctoral studies suggests that the presence of nomadic fishing communities played a key role in the establishment of Angkor. These communities provided the necessary man-power to capture fish during the short fishing season, which coincided with the rice harvest. These fishing communities had to travel hundreds of kilometres annually to the Tonle Sap Lake following fish migration patterns, while at the same time land-based communities travelled to the lake to obtain the fish needed to produce prahok, a fermented fish paste that is at the heart of Khmer cuisine. This gathering provided opportunities for human interaction and likely acted as a conduit for culture dispersal and knowledge transfer. In this context of cooperation determined by ecological pressure, the only way to understand the complex relationship that emerged from it is by studying how the functional aspects of the environment influenced the cosmological, economic, and political world of Angkor.

Short bio

I am a maritime archaeologist interested in the development of maritime cultures in inland waters. I studied History at the University of Alcala before pursuing a master's degree in maritime archaeology at UCL and a DPhil at the Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology. My current research is focused on human-environment interactions in fluvial settings. I am also interested in engaging with popular audiences and have written articles and books for National Geographic.

Research interests

  • Autism
  • Prosody (French and Finnish)
  • Gaze behavior
  • Misunderstanding situations
  • Speech disfluencies

Current research

Interaction of Preadolescents with Autism - Focus on Speech Prosody, Gaze Behavior and Misunderstanding Situations

Persons afflicted with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often have prominent prosodic features in their speech. By creating an impression of oddness, these features can constitute a significant obstacle to the social acceptance of the individual. They also affect ASD speakers ratings of social and communicative competence. The crucial role of eye contact in fluent interaction has long been acknowledged.

One of the key features of normal gaze behavior is that listeners look at speakers. ASD subjects are deficient in this gaze response. Gaze constituting such an important interactional resource, ASD persons tendency to avoid eye contact may affect the fluidity of conversations and cause misunderstandings. For this reason, it is important to know the precise ways in which the gaze avoidance is done, and the ways in which it affects the interaction.

This project aims at discovering prosodic features and gaze behavior that characterize people afflicted with ASD independently of the mother tongue and the cultural environment of the person. In addition, the project aims at discovering the role of the prosodic features and the direction of gaze in misunderstanding situations occurring in ASD peoples interaction. Methodologically, two different viewpoints will be adopted. One of these is qualitative (conversation analysis) and the other one is quantitative (experimental and instrumental phonetics).

Short Bio

Mari Wiklund (née Lehtinen) works as a university researcher at the HCAS since 2015. She received her PhD in French Philology from the University of Helsinki in 2009, and the title of docent in 2015. She holds the position of a university lecturer of French Philology in the University of Helsinki since 2018. Her current research interests include for example: 1) interaction of autistic preadolescents (prosody of speech, gaze behavior and understanding problems); 2) disfluencies (autistic vs. neurotypical preadolescents); 3) audio description (prosodic features); 4) asylum seekers’ speech (understanding problems, repairs); and 5) expatriate Finns’ speech (prosody of code-switchings).

Research Interests

  • African Christianity
  • Intercultural encounters
  • Religion and politics

Current Research

Theology between Text and Orality: The Kimbanguist Doctrine of Incarnation

The Kimbanguist Church of Congolese background is probably the largest African Instituted Church, with its about 30 million members.  During the colonial era, under persecution by Belgians, the Kimbanguist movement had only oral popular theology. When the church could organize itself at Congolese independence, it adopted an official rather mainline Protestant written doctrine. There was a tension between the oral Kikongo and Lingala popular theology and the theology written in French. The popular belief perceived the founding figure Simon Kimbangu (ca. 1889-1951) as an incarnation of the Holy Spirit and his three sons as incarnations of the persons of the Trinity. Today, this popular faith is expressed also in French and in writing as has become de facto doctrine defining Kimbanguist orthodoxy. This, in turn, has led to tensions between the Kimbanguists and other Christians. This study analyses the processes of formation of doctrine, its theological content and the roles of orality and writ in theological imagination. The project combines ethnographical methods with theological textual analysis.

Short Bio

Mika Vähäkangas is professor in mission studies and ecumenics at Lund University, Sweden since 2009. He holds ThD, MTh, MA (African Studies), all from University of Helsinki. He has served as the president of the International Association for Mission Studies 2012-2016. He has also worked as lecturer at Makumira University College of Tumaini University. He has led several Africa-related projects in research and tertiary education. He consults the World Council of Churches and the Lutheran World Federation.

Research interests

  • Gender equality policy
  • Feminist economics
  • Political economy

Current research

Missing "Plan F" - A Battle between Knowledge, Economy and Equality in the Changing Welfare State

Why did gender equality vanish from the policy agenda in the moment when the austerity policy is about to cause a backlash in gender equality in Finland, one of the most gender-equal countries in the world? The research begins with a hypothesis: in Finland, at present, there is an intensification of changes taking place that the welfare state has been going through since the 1980s. The current reform of the state is taking place along the lines of strategic governance. The latter is a form of managerial practice in which economic imperatives and evidence seemingly replace ideological concerns in policymaking. This research aims to find out what the terms and conditions for gender equality and equality policy in the “strategic state” are. In addition to facilitating the adoption of austerity measures the strategic governance reform has de-democratized policy making and helped to push gender equality off the political agenda. The key processes that are analyzed are economization, marketization and de-democratization.

Short Bio

Hanna Ylöstalo obtained her PhD (Gender Studies) at the University of Tampere. She is also a Docent in Gender Studies at the University of Tampere. Ylöstalo's research is concerned with gender equality policy, gender equality and diversity in work organizations, gender and economy, and post-Fordist labour. Her ongoing project, titled Missing “Plan F” – A battle between knowledge, economy and equality in the changing welfare state (2017-2020) is concerned with the changing conditions of gender equality policy in Finland. Ylöstalo’s research interests include neoliberalization of the Nordic welfare state and changing economy-society relations.

Research interests

  • Greco-Roman biography (Plutarch) 
  • Ancient intellectuals under the Roman empire 
  • Classical reception in nineteenth century Russia

Current research

The Uses of Antiquity in Imperial Russia, 1801-1837

The project investigates the role of Greco-Roman antiquity within the discursive repertoire of the educated Russian elite in the first third of the nineteenth century. Intertextual dialogue with classical Greece and Rome was important to the cultural and political stakeholders of imperial Russia, who during this period witnessed and commented on the military confrontation with Napoleon and were involved in the debates on Russias national identity, literary language and sociopolitical trajectories. The project is primarily text-centred and aims to produce a detailed and dynamic thick description of the writerly and readerly uses of antiquity in Russia from the ascension of Alexander I in 1801 to 1837, when commemorative coverage of the struggle against Napoleon escalated for the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Patriotic War of 1812.

Short bio

Alexei Zadorojnyi studied Classics at Moscow Lomonosov University. Having graduated in 1996, he proceeded to doctoral research at the University of Exeter, United Kingdom. His PhD (1999) was about Plutarch's use of poetic material. Since 1999 Alexei has been teaching Classics at the University of Liverpool. He was fellow of Centre for Hellenic Studies, Washington DC in 2007/2008.