Keynote Speaker

Richard Henderson is a structural biologist, with a background in physics.  His research trajectory began with protein crystallography using X-ray diffraction, then electron crystallography especially on bacteriorhodopsin, and most recently single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM).  CryoEM has now reached the stage where it is possible to obtain atomic structures of a wide variety of macromolecular complexes routinely without crystals.  He is now focused on understanding the remaining problems in cryoEM that need to be solved to make the method reach its theoretical potential.

Richard Henderson was awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. Richard shared the honour jointly with Jacques Dubochet and Joachim Frank “for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution”.

Richard's lab website

Keynote Speaker

Z. Hong Zhou is a Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics and the Director of the Electron Imaging Center for Nanomachines at University of California, Los Angeles. He received his early education in physics at the University of Science and Technology of China and earned his PhD in biochemistry at the Baylor College of Medicine in 1995. Zhou has published over 200 research articles and chapters. His research addresses both practical and fundamental biological questions, such as how viruses assemble and spread and how proteins and nucleic acids interact to store and release energy, to transduce signals, and to perform tasks of chemistry or functions of life.

Zhou was a Pew Scholar in Biological Sciences and a Basil O’Connor Scholar of the March of Dimes Foundation. He is a recipient of a Burton Award and K. H. Kuo Distinguished Scientist Award. 

Hong's lab website

Invited Speaker

Radu Aricescu is an MRC Senior Research Fellow and Programme Leader at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge and a visiting professor at the University of Oxford, WCHG, Division of Structural Biology. He leads a research group employing structural, biochemical and electrophysiology methods to study the mechanisms of neuronal synapse formation, function and remodelling. Radu completed undergraduate and MSc training in biology and molecular biology at the University of Bucharest, Romania, and received a PhD in neurobiology from the University College London. This was followed by postdoctoral training in structural biology at the University of Oxford.

Radu's lab website

Invited Speaker

Ariane Briegel is a professor at the Leiden University (The Netherlands). She has over 15 years of experience using cryo-electron microscopy to study bacterial and archaeal ultrastructure. The Briegel laboratory focuses on investigating how microbes sense and respond to their environment. In order to gain insight into the structure and function of the molecular complexes involved in these behaviors, the lab uses electron cryotomography and correlative microscopy methods. 

Ariane's lab website

Invited Speaker

Prof. Liz Carpenter is a structural biologist with a fascination for understanding how structures of proteins influence their function, how this contributes to disease and ultimately how this information can be used to cure disease. She has extensive experience in crystallography, having established a career in structural biology of soluble proteins, working with Prof. Sir Tom Blundell at Birkbeck College, London, with Prof. Dodson in NIMR, Dr. Brown and Prof. Freemont at Imperial College, London. At Imperial College, while working with Prof. So Iwata, she developed an interest in membrane protein structural biology, one of the most challenging areas in the field. Prof. Carpenter subsequently moved to the Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire, the British Synchrotron, where she established and ran the Membrane Protein Laboratory, an international research and training facility in membrane protein structure and function. In October 2009, she took up the post of Principal Investigator for the Integral Membrane Proteins group at the SGC, in the Nuffield Department of Medicine in Oxford. At the SGC the Carpenter group has now solved the structures of nine human membrane protein structures involved in disease.

Liz's lab website

 

Invited Speaker

Rubén Fernández-Busnadiego is a project group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany. His group investigates the structural basis of toxic protein aggregation in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s using the latest advances in cryo-electron tomography. This work is illuminating the pathogenic interactions of aggregates with their cellular environment at unprecedented resolution.

Ruben's lab website 

Invited Speaker

Kay Grünewald is a structural cell biologist with an interest in structure–function relationships particularly understanding mechanisms of membrane modulation. Working as postdoctoral fellow with Alasdair C. Steven at NIH, Bethesda, he pioneered electron cryo tomography of pleomorphic viruses. Starting his lab at the Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried associated with the department of Wolfgang Baumeister he focussed on analyses of virus-host cell interactions taking an integrative structural biology approach. In 2009, he moved to the Division of Structural Biology at the University of Oxford, UK, heading the Oxford Particle Imaging Centre until 2017 and became full professor in 2013. He co-founded (with Helen Saibil, Dave Stuart and Gerd Materlik) the UK National CryoEM Facility eBIC at Diamond Light Source. In 2017 Kay moved to the Centre for Structural Systems Biology (CSSB) in Hamburg jointly appointed by Universität Hamburg and Heinrich Pette Institute, Leibniz Institute of Experimental Virology. Driven by biological questions his group develops new approaches, e.g. correlative microscopies including super-resolution fluorescence cryo microscopies.

Kay’s lab website

Invited Speaker

Wanda Kukulski did her PhD in Andreas Engel’s lab at the Biozentrum in Basel, where she learned electron microscopy and applied it to study the structure of water channels. As a postdoc in the groups of Marko Kaksonen and John Briggs at the EMBL in Heidelberg, she developed a correlative microscopy workflow and applied it to study endocytosis. Currently Wanda is a group leader in the Cell Biology Division of the LMB, studying how membrane architectures are linked to cellular function. 

Wanda's lab website

Invited Speaker

Tzviya Zeev-Ben-Mordehai is a Principal Investigator at the Cryo Electron Microscopy section of the Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research at Utrecht University. Tzviya received her PhD in Structural Biology from the Weizmann institute of Science in Israel. She then moved to the University of Oxford for a postdoc to study the herpes virus fusion machinery. In 2015 she established her own research group in the University of Oxford studying the mechanism of fusion proteins by applying multimodality structural biology approach. In 2017 she relocated her group to the Utrecht University in the Netherlands. 

Tzviya's lab website

Invited Speaker

Peijun Zhang obtained her Ph.D. in Biophysics and Physiology from University Virginia, M.S. in Physics and B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Nanjing University, China. She was a postdoc and later a staff scientist at the National Cancer Institute, NIH. In 2006, she joined the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh, and was promoted to associate professor with tenure in 2012. She recently joined the University of Oxford as a full professor, and jointly as the founding director of eBIC (the UK National Electron Bio-imaging Centre) at the Diamond Light Source. Her research focuses on the molecular mechanisms of large protein complexes and assemblies, in particular those involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis and bacterial chemotaxis signaling, by developing and combining novel technologies for high-resolution cryoEM and cryoET. 

Peijun's lab website