Helsinki appeals to researchers

The New Scientist has suggested that researchers looking for a change should go to Scandinavia. This is based on the Scandinavians doing better than other Europeans.

Sarah Butcher

In an article titled “The Happiest Place in the World”, the British magazine introduces its readers to a researcher’s life in Scandinavia. Sarah ButcherΕΎ who has enjoyed her eleven years in Finland, first and foremost appreciates the high-quality public services, such as inexpensive daycare.

“For a female researcher and a mother, this is one of the biggest benefits,” says Butcher.

Butchers works as a team leader at the Institute of Biotechnology at the University of Helsinki. Foreign researchers are appreciated at the institute, which always makes team leader positions available to international applicants.

“I am very pleased with the support I have received here. I get funding for my research, the teamwork is very fluent and the great atmosphere at the institute is motivating,” explains Butcher.

Scandinavia is at the top of the well-being list when measuring satisfaction with life, human relationships and work. The UK-based New Economics Foundation has studied the well-being of citizens in 22 European countries.

Of the Scandinavian countries, Denmark and Norway performed the best in the survey. Sweden, on the other hand, got lower points than Finland. Central and East European countries performed the most poorly.

The New Scientist supposes that the satisfaction of Scandinavians is caused by the support they get from the society. For a researcher, Scandinavia is also a good choice because there are more investments in research and development operations than in the rest of Europe.

“In the last few years, the support the university has provided for new researchers has clearly improved. Finnish language studies have helped me adjust to the University,” says Butcher.

>> Institute of Biotechnology

>> New Scientist article

>> European Social Survey

Text: Kati Puhakka
Photo: Veikko Somerpuro
Translation: AAC Noodi
11.5.2009
www.helsinki.fi/verkkotoimitus


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