The Master's Degree Programme in

Environment and Natural Resources MENVI

Structure

Photo by: Linda TammistoThe Master´s Degree Programme in Environment and Natural Resources (MENVI, 120 ECTS) consists of general studies, major subject studies, and multidiciplinary environmental studies.

The major subject studies include core studies in the study line selected by the student. The students choose the study line when they apply to the MENVI.

Read more about the degree requirements in the Content page and about the study lines in their own pages: Agroecology, Environmental Engineering in Agriculture, Environmental Soil Science or Microbiology.

See the following table for the preliminary structural breakdown of the programme:

 

Master's Degree 120 ECTS
General Studies Personal Study Plan, Academic Writing, Statistics, Bioethics, Work Life Orientation etc. 16 ECTS
Major Subject Studies

Study line options:

Agroecology
Environmental Engineering in Agriculture
Environmental Soil Science
Microbiology

70 - 76 ECTS
Multidisciplinary Environmental Studies Courses in other majors or study lines related to environmental issues. 28 - 34 ECTS

 

Specialist options

Agroecology

Agroecology advances sustainable development in agriculture and food systems, with focus on ecological sustainability. The courses focus on agroecosystems, agrobiodiversity, and production systems. Read more...

Environmental Engineering in Agriculture

Environmental engineering studies interactions between agricultural production and the environment and the methods for measuring and modelling them. Environmental engineering develops production methods and production systems which are both ecological and economical. Read more...

Environmental Soil Science

Environmental soil science focuses on processes and phenomena occurring in soil. The interactions of soil with plants, watercourses and air are studied using chemistry, physics and biology. Read more...

Microbiology

Microbiology is a multidisciplinary science on the biology of microbial organisms, which are too small in size to be seen at cellular level without magnification by a microscope. Bacteria, archaea, yeasts and other fungi, and microscopic unicellular animals (protists) and plants (algae) are traditionally studied by microbiologists. Read more...