Full section schedules & abstracts
(updated 1.6.13)

Monday, June 10

Block A (14.00-15.30)

Section 1: Varieties of Asia & Africa

Section 2: English in language policies

Section 3: Phraseology & formulaic language

Section 4: Teaching & learning English

Block B (16.00-17.00)

Section 1: English & identity in higher education

Section 2: Social impacts of English in Europe

Section 3: Variation & global implications

Tuesday, June 11

Block A (10.30-11.30)

Section 1: Explorations in ICE

  • Terttu Nevalainen, University of Helsinki; and Tanja Säily, University of Helsinki
    Comparing like with like? Tools for exploring families of corpora
  • Hanna Parviainen, University of Tampere
    The omission of overt direct objects of transitive verbs in Asian Englishes

    • Abstract:

      The paper examines the omission of overt direct objects of transitive verbs such as "A: Do you know Malyalam? B: Oh yes I speak." (ICE-IND) in contexts where the verb cannot function as an intransitive verb. The English varieties examined for this study come from India, Singapore, Philippine and Hong Kong while the British and American varieties were added for point of reference. The study analyses the frequency of the phenomenon in sentences where verbs such as give, make, get and buy are used transitively. The focus of this quantitative study is on spoken language while possible substrate influences on the varieties are also discussed. The data for Singapore, Philippine, Hong Kong, Indian and British English were obtained from the spoken sections of the International Corpus of English (ICE), whereas the American variety was studied by using The Santa Barbara Corpus of Spoken American English. The results of the study indicate that the strongest tendency of omitting overt direct objects of transitive verbs can be found in SinE and IndE while the feature is rare in the British and American varieties of English.

    • References:

      Bhatt, Rakesh M. 2000. "Optimal expressions in Indian English." English Language and Linguistics. 4.1: 69-95. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

      Subbārāo, Kārumūri V. 2012. South Asian Languages: A Syntactic Typology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

      Wee, Lionel. 2004. Singapore English: morphology and syntax. In Bernd Kortmann, Kate Burridge, Rajend Mesthrie, Edgar W. Schneider and Clive Upton (eds.), A Handbook of Varieties of English, Vol 2: Morphology and Syntax (pp. 1058-1072). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Section 2: Corpora in the Expanding Circle

Section 3: Perceptions of English in Asia

Section 4: Internationalization of higher education

Block B (14.00-15.00)

Section 1: Creoles & contact linguistics

Section 2: Investigating universals

Section 3: Perceptions of English in Asia (cont.)

Block C (15.30-17.00)

Section 1: English in professional settings

Section 2: Theoretical challenges & openings

Section 3: Emerging norms in global English

Section 4: Internationalization of higher education (cont.)

Wednesday, June 12

Block A (10.30-11.30)

Section 1: Studies in UK varieties

Section 2: Loanwords & borrowings

Section 3: Computer Mediated Communication

Section 4: Lexicon & lexicography

Block B (13.00-14.00)

Section 1: Studies in ELF corpora

Section 2: Bilingualism & multilingualism

Section 3: Computer Mediated Communication (cont.)