Full section schedules & abstracts
(updated 1.6.13)

Monday, June 10

Block A (14.00-15.30)

Section 1: Varieties of Asia & Africa

Section 2: English in language policies

Section 3: Phraseology & formulaic language

Section 4: Teaching & learning English

Block B (16.00-17.00)

Section 1: English & identity in higher education

Section 2: Social impacts of English in Europe

Section 3: Variation & global implications

Tuesday, June 11

Block A (10.30-11.30)

Section 1: Explorations in ICE

Section 2: Corpora in the Expanding Circle

Section 3: Perceptions of English in Asia

Section 4: Internationalization of higher education

Block B (14.00-15.00)

Section 1: Creoles & contact linguistics

  • Simanique Moody, Leiden University
    Contact Varieties in Contact: A Closer Look at African American English and Gullah/Geechee

    • Abstract:

      The language and culture of speakers of the English-lexifier creole Gullah/Geechee have traditionally been examined in isolation from African American English speakers. Particular attention has been given to Gullah/Geechee communities from the South Carolina Sea Islands and, to a lesser extent, the Georgia Sea Islands rather than those from the coastal mainland areas where much of the contact with African American English speakers was historically likely to occur (Turner, 1945, 1949; Herskovits, 1958; Jones-Jackson 1987; Twining and Baird, 1991; Weldon 1998; Holloway, 2005). This dichotomous view is over-simplified, however, given that sustained contact with African American English in the coastal mainland areas has also influenced Gullah/Geechee and vice versa. Moreover, communities that in the past had limited contact with one another are coming into greater and greater contact owing both to technological innovations and shared social, political, and economic realities. These realities must also be reflected in research on African American language and culture. In this paper, I argue that what is missing in studies of both African American English and Gullah/Geechee is a broader perspective that considers the past and present-day contact between them. Furthermore, I show that examining this contact will better explain the linguistic variation found among African Americans in Southeast Georgia in particular.

  • Angela Bartens, University of Turku
    Me, Mary, and I

Section 2: Investigating universals

Section 3: Perceptions of English in Asia (cont.)

Block C (15.30-17.00)

Section 1: English in professional settings

Section 2: Theoretical challenges & openings

Section 3: Emerging norms in global English

Section 4: Internationalization of higher education (cont.)

Wednesday, June 12

Block A (10.30-11.30)

Section 1: Studies in UK varieties

Section 2: Loanwords & borrowings

Section 3: Computer Mediated Communication

Section 4: Lexicon & lexicography

Block B (13.00-14.00)

Section 1: Studies in ELF corpora

Section 2: Bilingualism & multilingualism

Section 3: Computer Mediated Communication (cont.)