Full section schedules & abstracts
(updated 1.6.13)

Monday, June 10

Block A (14.00-15.30)

Section 1: Varieties of Asia & Africa

Section 2: English in language policies

Section 3: Phraseology & formulaic language

Section 4: Teaching & learning English

Block B (16.00-17.00)

Section 1: English & identity in higher education

Section 2: Social impacts of English in Europe

Section 3: Variation & global implications

Tuesday, June 11

Block A (10.30-11.30)

Section 1: Explorations in ICE

Section 2: Corpora in the Expanding Circle

Section 3: Perceptions of English in Asia

Section 4: Internationalization of higher education

Block B (14.00-15.00)

Section 1: Creoles & contact linguistics

  • Simanique Moody, Leiden University
    Contact Varieties in Contact: A Closer Look at African American English and Gullah/Geechee
  • Angela Bartens, University of Turku
    Me, Mary, and I

    • Abstract:

      During our fieldwork on San Andrés Island (Colombia), we have come across the following structure which also exists in Nicaraguan Creole English: when pronouns are conjoined with full NPs, both San Andrés and Nicaraguan Creole English prefer the order pronoun-NP whereas the reverse order has to be considered an English-derived construction:

      (1)

      Mi an Mary gaan huom. (Nicaraguan CE)

      1SG.SBJ and Mary GO.PST home

      'I and Mary went home.'

      (2)

      Mary an Ai gaan huom. (Nicaraguan CE)

      Mary and 1SG.SBJ GO.PST home

      'Mary and I went home.'

      The very same order can be found in Twi, Fanti, and Evegbe:

      (3)

      Me ne Mary kᴐ-ᴐ dwa-mu. (Twi)

      1SG and Mary go-PAST market-inside

      'I and Mary went to the market.'

      (4)

      Me nyε Mary kᴐ-ᴐ gua-mu. (Fanti)

      ISG and Mary go-PAST market-inside

      'I and Mary went to the market.'

      (5)

      Nye kple Mary mi-yi asime. (Ewe)

      1SG with Mary 1PL-go market

      'I and Mary went to the market.'

      Even though this does not appear to be a marked construction on cross-linguistic terms, its occurrence may be due to universals operating in first/second language acquisition. - While considering the aforementioned parallels, we are committed to unearthing more and more similarities between English-derived varieties.

Section 2: Investigating universals

Section 3: Perceptions of English in Asia (cont.)

Block C (15.30-17.00)

Section 1: English in professional settings

Section 2: Theoretical challenges & openings

Section 3: Emerging norms in global English

Section 4: Internationalization of higher education (cont.)

Wednesday, June 12

Block A (10.30-11.30)

Section 1: Studies in UK varieties

Section 2: Loanwords & borrowings

Section 3: Computer Mediated Communication

Section 4: Lexicon & lexicography

Block B (13.00-14.00)

Section 1: Studies in ELF corpora

Section 2: Bilingualism & multilingualism

Section 3: Computer Mediated Communication (cont.)