Contact

The Research Project Europe 1815-1914

P.O. Box 24
Unioninkatu 40
FI-00014 University of Helsinki
Finland

erere-info[at]helsinki.fi

Partneri

Calendar

The programme is continuously updated. New events might be advertised with short notice. External participants are welcome but preferably on a regular basis. Since the number of seats is limited pre-registration with project coordinator Minna Vainio (erere-info[at]helsinki.fi) is requested.

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15 -16 Dec 2012
First meeting of theWorking Group Property and Poverty: Perspectives on the Nineteenth-Century Social Question

A two-day closed workshop with seven presentations intended to establish the groundwork for a second meeting to be held in April, this meeting sought to problematize one of the central themes of the EReRe project as a whole, the nineteenth-century fissure between the economic and the social.  Focusing on nineteenth- and early twentieth-century responses to the Social Question, participants discussed a range of attempts to articulate the problem of inequality in an industrial age as both a political and intellectual challenge.

Subjects discussed included Elizabeth Gaskell’s appropriation and critique of Thomas Carlyle’s views on business organization and industrial leadership; the development of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon’s theory of property after his famous declaration in 1840 that ‘property is theft’; Lorenz von Stein’s conception of social science; the idea of a social economics and its relationship to the political economy of J.-C.-L. Simonde de Sismondi; German debates on Caesarism in the light of the Social Question; Dutch reform politics in the middle part of the century and the bearing of economic and social debate on constitutional change; and the emergence of the national socialist alternative to class-based  socialism in late nineteenth-century Sweden.

These papers will form the basis for further discussion in April.