Conference e-mail
fcree-aleksconf@helsinki.fi


The Aleksanteri Institute

Unioninkatu 33 (P.O. Box 42)
00014 University of Helsinki

aleksanteri [at] helsinki.fi

Past Aleksanteri Conferences

Keynote speakers (in alphabetical order)

 

 

Linda J. Cook


Linda J. Cook
received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1985. She is currently a professor in the political science and Slavic studies departments at Brown University, and an associate of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University. Linda Cook is a prominent expert on the politics and structure of welfare in Russia and post-communist Europe. Her earlier work was dedicated to Soviet-era welfare policies.  Her subsequent research has traced how welfare state change was initiated and negotiated politically, and how it has been influenced by both domestic politics and international institutions and policy constructs. Professor Cook has also worked on issues of political representation, labor, and non-governmental organizations. Her key publications are The Soviet Social Contract and Why it Failed (Harvard, 1993) and the highly acclaimed Post-communist Welfare States: Reform Politics in Russia and Eastern Europe (Cornell, 2007).  Her research has been supported by the Davis Center, the National Council on East European and Eurasian Studies, the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development, and the Fulbright Foundation. She is currently researching the effects of recession on Russia’s welfare state, with a focus on health care.


Her Aleksanteri Conference key-note address is titled:

Labour Migrants’ Access to Social Services in Russia

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Judith Pallot

 

Professor Judith Pallot has been engaged in research and teaching in Russian Area Studies for four decades. She was appointed to a lecturing post on the geography of the USSR in the University of Oxford and Christ Church college in 1979 where she has been ever since, becoming Professor of the Human Geography of Russia in 2008. She is presently President of BASEES (the British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies). In the 1970s and 80 she took part in debates about the social history of the Russian peasantry and after 1991 she worked in collaboration with Tatyana Nefedova on the transformation of the agrarian sector in Russia focusing on household sector. More recently she has become interested in the historical-geography or the Russian Prison System and its impact on different social groups, with the emphasis on women prisoners, in particular.  She has published widely, including books and articles, on her research. Her most recent book (with Elenea Katz) is Waiting at the Gate:  Women, Identity and the Russian Penal System, I.B. Tauris, November, 2016.

Her Aleksanteri Conference key-note address is titled: The Role of the Russian Penal System in Reproducing Social and Geographical Marginalisation

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Thomas Remington


Thomas Remington
holds a Ph.D., in Political Science, from the Yale University. Currently he is Goodrich C. White Professor of Political Science at Emory University.  He also holds associate posts at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University, USA, and at the International Center for the Study of Institutions and Development at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow, Russia. He is one of the leading scholars on Russian politics, policy-making and social policy. Among his recent publications are Presidential Decrees in Russia: A Comparative Perspective (Cambridge University Press, 2014); The Politics of Inequality in Russia (Cambridge University Press, 2011) and The Russian Parliament: Institutional Evolution in a Transitional Regime, 1989-1999 (Yale University Press, 2001).   

His research focuses on the development of social welfare institutions in Russia, and in comparative perspective. Specifically his work has examined the questions of regional inequality, the formation of the middle class and Russian labour market. He has also written on the development of political institutions in post-communist states, including parliamentary politics, legislative-executive relations.


His Aleksanteri Conference key-note address is titled:

Russian Economic Inequality in Comparative Perspective

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Svetlana Stephenson


Svetlana Stephenson
is a reader in Sociology at the London Metropolitan University. She gained her PhD from the Institute of Sociology of the Russian Academy of Science. Dr Stephenson published widely on the issues of social structure in Russia, informality and criminal networks, youth, and inequality. Specifically her research has involved studying urban social organisation, violent street groups, disadvantaged social categories, particularly among the young people (homeless, street children and sex workers), which she has research in the context of contemporary Russia and comparatively. Among Dr Stephenson’s recent works are Gangs of Russia: from the Streets to the Corridors of Power (Cornell, 2015), Crossing the Line: Vagrancy, Homelessness and Social Displacement in Russia (Ashgate, 2006) and Youth and Social Change in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (Routledge, 2012) co-authored with Charles Walker.


Her Aleksanteri Conference key-note address is titled:

Joining the Old Guard: Young People and Patrimonial Networks in Russia

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Göran Therborn

Göran Therborn is Professor emeritus of Sociology at the University of Cambridge. He is a global  scholar working on  issues of  social inequality, class relations, power structures and social protest, gender and family relations, cities and well as on Europe, globalization, modernity and social theory. He received his PhD from Lund University, Sweden, in 1974. Over his academic career, he has taught widely in Europe, Asia and the Americas and has authored or edited about 35 books and published in 24 languages. He is doctor honoris causa at Helsinki University (and four other universities). His recent works include The Killing Fields of Inequality (Cambridge, Polity Press 2013), The World: A Beginner's Guide (Cambridge, Polity, 2011, From Marxism to Post-Marxism? (London, Verso, 2008), Between Sex and Power (London, Routledge, 2004. His next, Cities of Power. The Urban, the National, the Popular, and the Global is in press (London, Verso, March 2017).

His Aleksanteri Conference key-note address is titled:
Life, Death and Welfare. Russia in Context.

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Nataliya Zubarevich


Nataliya Zubarevich
received her doctorate from the Moscow State University. She is a professor at the Department of Geography at Moscow State University and the Director of the regional program at the Independent Institute for Social Policy (Moscow). The area of her expertise is socio-economic development of regions, regional economy and budget regulation, human geography and urban development in Russia. Her current research is devoted to crisis trends in Russian regions and budget destabilization analysis, as well as trends of Russian cities and towns social-ecomomic development including one company towns. Professor Zubarevich’s recent publications include: Regionny Rossii: Neravenstvo, Krizis, Modernizatsiya (Regions of Russia: Inequality, Crisis, Modernization) (Moskva: NISP); Indikatory Ustoychivogo Razvitiya: Ekonomika, Obshchestvo, Priroda (Indexes of Sustainable Development: Economy, Society, Environment) (Moskva: Maks Press, 2008) with Bobyliev, S.N. and Solov’eva S.V.; Krupniy Biznes v Regionakh Rossii (Big Business in Russian Regions) (Moskva: Pomatur, 2005); Rossiya Regionov (Russia of the Regions) (Moskva: Pomatur, 2005); Sotsial’noe Razvitie Regionov Rossii (Social Development of Russian Regions) (Moskva: URSS, 2003).

Professor Zubarevich has taken part in a large variety of research projects and consultative bodies to governmental and international organizations, including the UN, UNICEF and the World Bank.


Her Aleksanteri Conference key-note address is titled:

Regional and Social Aspects of the Russia's Crisis

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Pre-conference roundtable speakers (in alphabetical order)

 

Rolle Alho


Rolle Alho is a postdoctoral researcher at the Swedish School of Social Science at the University of Helsinki. Alho holds a PhD in Social Policy from University of Turku and a MSc in Sociology from London School of Economics and Political Science. Alho has also worked as a researcher for example at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center and the Family Federation, Finland. Alho’s research interests include employment relations, social security, migration, and ethnic relations -and above all, how these question are intersected. His Phd thesis (2015) focused on labour market organisations’ immigration strategies. Currently Alho is conducting research on highly educated migrants’ job search strategies and teaching migration studies at the University of Helsinki.


Rolle Alho is the moderator of the roundtable.

 

 

Elli Heikkilä


Adjunct Professor, Ph.D. Elli Heikkilä is the Research Director of the Migration Institute of Finland. Her licentiate thesis (1986) and dissertation (1989) have dealt with migration and regional development. Population ageing was the topic of the postdoctoral research (1993). She has taken part to many international projects including migration and labour markets. Heikkilä is the co-editor of the international journal of Migration Letters. She is Adjunct Professor, specialized in population geography, to the University of Oulu, and University of Turku in Finland.

Title of the presentation: Integration of Immigrants in the Finnish Labour Market - Still Efforts to be Done

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Anna-Liisa Heusala


Anna-Liisa Heusala received her doctoral degree in political science in the University of Helsinki in 2005. She is a senior researcher in the Aleksanteri Institute and a fellow in the Academy of Finland Centre of Excellence in Russia Studies (2012-2017). Her research interests include Russian comprehensive security, public administration and security policy. She has published in the International Review of Administrative Sciences and Review of Central and East European Law. Her most recent work is Heusala A-L & Aitamurto, K (eds.) (2016), Migrant Workers in Russia – Global Challenges of the Shadow Economy in Societal Transformation. Routledge: Routledge Contemporary Russia and Eastern Europe Series.

Title of the presentation: Migrant Workers in the Shadow Economy – the Russian Experience

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Eve Kyntäjä


Eve Kyntäjä holds a Master’s degree in psychology, and she has worked at the Central Organisation of Finnish Trade Unions (SAK) since 2000. As of 2009, she has acted as SAK’s expert on immigration issues. Her responsibilities include labour force mobility, immigration policy, integration policy and multiculturalism. She represents wage earner organisations in various Finnish and EU organs, such as the Advisory Committee on Free Movement of Workers of the European Commission and the European Territorial Cooperation working group on migration. Kyntäjä is responsible for the immigration policy expert group of SAK and its member labour unions.
Previously, Kyntäjä worked as a researcher at the Institute of Migration (1992–1997), at the Aleksanteri Institute (1997–2000) and in the Department of Social Psychology at the University of Helsinki (2000–2002). Her research topics include immigration policy in various European countries and the integration, identity and social exclusion experiences of immigrants (Estonians, Russians and Ingrian Finns).

Title of the presentation: Labour Migration in the European Union - Challenges and Opportunities
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Kari Tapiola


Born in Helsinki in 1946, Kari Tapiola started his professional life in 1966 as a journalist, first in the daily Helsingin Sanomat and then in the Finnish Broadcasting Corporation. In 1972 he became International Secretary of the Central Organization of Finnish Trade Unions SAK. Later he worked at the United Nations in New York and the OECD in Paris, returning to SAK in 1985. He was involved in advising and assisting Soviet and Central European trade unions on transition to a market economy. In 1991 he became a Worker Member of the ILO's Governing Body, and in 1996 he was appointed Deputy Director-General of the ILO, notably in charge of international labour standards and fundamental rights at work. In this capacity he was deeply involved in developing the ILO's approach of dealing with serious labour standards problems through advice and technical assistance. During this time particular attention was devoted to Myanmar, Zimbabwe, Colombia, China, Iran, the Gulf States, Georgia and Belarus. After retiring in 2014 he has continued to work with the ILO on labour rights in a number of countries, such as the elimination of child and forced labour in cotton picking in Uzbekistan.
In 2011, he conducted a mission to assist the Government and the trade unions and employers of the Russian federation to deal with complaints on the violation of freedom of association rights.

Title of the presentation: No Labour Market without Migration
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Charlie Walker

 

Charlie Walker is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Southampton, and Honorary Member of the Centre for Russian, European and Eurasian Studies at the University of Birmingham. He was previously Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Russian and Eurasian Studies Centre, St Antony’s College, University of Oxford. His research has explored the production of class, gender and spatial inequalities in Russia and the former Soviet Union, particularly through young people's transitions to adulthood. His most recent work addresses sources of and barriers to wellbeing amongst Russian men employed in blue-collar professions. He is author of Learning to Labour in post-Soviet Russia: Vocational Youth in Transition (Routledge, 2011) and co-edited Innovations in Youth Research (Palgrave, 2012) and Youth and Social Change in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (Routledge, 2012). He is co-editor-in-chief of the BSA journal Sociological Research Online and is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Youth Studies. He has published articles in a range of peer-reviewed journals, including Sociology, Europe-Asia Studies, Journal of Youth Studies, International Journal of Human Resource Management, International Journal of Lifelong Education, Journal of Social Policy Studies, Social Alternatives and Idantutkimus.

Title of the presentation: Paying for Putinism: Workers’ Precarity in the Current Crisis
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